7

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Date

Les régimes commerciaux applicables aux pays en développement

01-09-2017

La politique commerciale et de développement de l’Union européenne est exposée dans la communication de janvier 2012 intitulée «Commerce, croissance et développement». Elle se concentre sur les pays qui ont le plus besoin d’aide. Pour les pays les moins avancés (PMA), le système de préférences généralisées (SPG) est maintenu, de même que le régime «Tout sauf les armes», tandis que le régime préférentiel accordé à des pays d’Afrique, des Caraïbes et du Pacifique (ACP) ne faisant pas partie des PMA ...

La politique commerciale et de développement de l’Union européenne est exposée dans la communication de janvier 2012 intitulée «Commerce, croissance et développement». Elle se concentre sur les pays qui ont le plus besoin d’aide. Pour les pays les moins avancés (PMA), le système de préférences généralisées (SPG) est maintenu, de même que le régime «Tout sauf les armes», tandis que le régime préférentiel accordé à des pays d’Afrique, des Caraïbes et du Pacifique (ACP) ne faisant pas partie des PMA est remplacé par des accords de partenariat économique qui comprennent un volet de développement. Une nouvelle stratégie de l’Union pour l’aide au commerce, destinée à aider les pays en développement à renforcer leurs capacités commerciales, est en cours d’élaboration; une nouvelle communication de la Commission en posera les bases. L’Union européenne soutient le Programme pour le développement lancé par l’OMC et elle a ratifié l’accord sur la facilitation des échanges en octobre 2015.

Addressing Developing Countries’ Challenges in Free Trade Implementation

02-02-2017

The present study places the potential effects of Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) liberalisation on government revenue in signatory states within the broader context of regional integration and global liberalisation. Based on a review of the secondary literature it finds that the revenue effect may be severe in some, but by no means all, cases and that the forecasts now need to be updated by country-level studies using the details of liberalisation schedules actually agreed. The evidence also ...

The present study places the potential effects of Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) liberalisation on government revenue in signatory states within the broader context of regional integration and global liberalisation. Based on a review of the secondary literature it finds that the revenue effect may be severe in some, but by no means all, cases and that the forecasts now need to be updated by country-level studies using the details of liberalisation schedules actually agreed. The evidence also suggests that poor countries find it very hard to replace government revenue lost through liberalisation but that where there have been successes the measures taken include those needed to increase any gains from regional and global trade integration. Such reforms require sustained commitment (by donors and recipients) over many years. The stresses created by EPAs (and regional liberalisation) increase the need for such commitment; but they also offer an opportunity since they include an appropriate framework for providing appropriate assistance. Yet data on flows of aid for trade do not indicate that an adequate commitment has yet been made. Six recommendations are made on actions that the European Parliament might champion to reduce the risks of an ‘EPA revenue squeeze’ in ways that support recipients’ capacity to benefit from greater regional and global integration.

Auteur externe

Isabella MASSA and Christopher STEVENS (Overseas Development Institute)

The EU-US Trade and Investment Partnership

16-05-2013

On 13 February 2013, European Union (EU) and United States (US) leaders announced the start of procedures for the launch of negotiations on a transatlantic free trade deal. The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) would address a broad range of issues, from the elimination of tariffs to reducing regulatory barriers and developing rules for global trade.

On 13 February 2013, European Union (EU) and United States (US) leaders announced the start of procedures for the launch of negotiations on a transatlantic free trade deal. The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) would address a broad range of issues, from the elimination of tariffs to reducing regulatory barriers and developing rules for global trade.

Proceedings of the Workshop on "The EU - Republic of Korea Free Trade Agreement: One Year After Its Entry Into Force"

11-01-2013

Proceedings of the workshop on "The EU - Republic of Korea free trade agreement: One year after its entry into force", held on 16 October 2012, in Brussel.

Proceedings of the workshop on "The EU - Republic of Korea free trade agreement: One year after its entry into force", held on 16 October 2012, in Brussel.

Auteur externe

Stephen WOOLCOCK (London School of Economics, the UK) and Giulio SABATTI (European Parliament - for Part IV, Library Statistical Spotlight)

Accord de libre-échange entre l'UE et le Japon : première évaluation de l'analyse d'impact de la Commission européenne

09-11-2012

La présente note vise à fournir une première évaluation des forces et des faiblesses de l'analyse d'impact de la Commission portant sur la proposition de recommandation au Conseil d'ouvrir des négociations en vue de la conclusion d’un accord de libre-échange avec le Japon.

La présente note vise à fournir une première évaluation des forces et des faiblesses de l'analyse d'impact de la Commission portant sur la proposition de recommandation au Conseil d'ouvrir des négociations en vue de la conclusion d’un accord de libre-échange avec le Japon.

The EU Banana Regime: Evolution and Implications of its Recent Changes

14-10-2010

The study first surveys the key issues resulting from the long banana dispute at the WTO. It distinguishes 3 phases in the attempt by the EC to design an EU-wide and WTO-compatible banana import regime: the first (1993-1999) in which the first regime applicable to all EU member countries was introduced and challenged in WTO, and the first modifications made with changes to the methods for delivery of import licenses; the second phase (1999-2005) when the future regime was negotiated and the transition ...

The study first surveys the key issues resulting from the long banana dispute at the WTO. It distinguishes 3 phases in the attempt by the EC to design an EU-wide and WTO-compatible banana import regime: the first (1993-1999) in which the first regime applicable to all EU member countries was introduced and challenged in WTO, and the first modifications made with changes to the methods for delivery of import licenses; the second phase (1999-2005) when the future regime was negotiated and the transition to a ‘tariff only’ regime began; the last phase (2006-to date) with the signing of the EPAs and the ‘Geneva agreement’ of 2009. The second part of the study looks at the possible implications of these recent changes, suggesting that their net effects are expected to be positive for ACP countries, slightly negative for Latin American countries, and indifferent for EU producers, which are unaffected due to the decoupled payment system now used for most production. The recent EU bilateral agreements with some Latin American banana producers further erode the preferential access of ACP producers and of other Latin American exporters to the EU, which are all expected to experience a limited decline in their relative competitiveness in the EU market. The main adjustment costs are likely to be borne by the Caribbean exporters, which will need to receive the majority of the support envisaged by the EU through the bananas accompanying measures to help banana exporters to adapt to the changes in the EU's import regime. These resources should be allocated across countries according to the expected losses in terms of banana exports and production, taking into account the lessons from previous similar schemes, including the SFA, STABEX, the support for sugar producers and the EU Rum Programme.

Auteur externe

CALÌ Massimiliano (Overseas Development Institute, United Kingdom) ; ABBOTT Roderick (LSE/ECIPE, United Kingdom) and PAGE Sheila (Overseas Development Institute, United Kingdom)

A snapshot of the banana trade: Who gets what?

30-06-2010

With the “Agreement of Geneva” the dispute about the banana imports over 15 years seems to come to an end. The liberalisation caused by this agreement will have a substantial impact on the international banana market. In order to estimate the possible effects and measures to be implemented in the future it is necessary to know the current situation of the banana trade, the factors determining trade policies, the main stakeholders and nodes in the value chain for bananas as well as their impact on ...

With the “Agreement of Geneva” the dispute about the banana imports over 15 years seems to come to an end. The liberalisation caused by this agreement will have a substantial impact on the international banana market. In order to estimate the possible effects and measures to be implemented in the future it is necessary to know the current situation of the banana trade, the factors determining trade policies, the main stakeholders and nodes in the value chain for bananas as well as their impact on labour conditions and livelihoods in exporting countries.

Auteur externe

Dr. Pedro Morazán, Institut SÜDWIND, Germany

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