215

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Date

Digital Europe programme: Funding digital transformation beyond 2020

26-05-2021

The Digital Europe Programme is a new financial support tool for the 2021-2027 period, aimed at bolstering the digital transformation of society, the economy and public administrations in the EU. With a financial envelope of €7.6 billion (in current prices), a figure 17.5 % lower than the initial Commission proposal, it will build up digital capacity and infrastructure and support a digital single market. The programme will operate mainly through coordinated and strategic co-investments with the ...

The Digital Europe Programme is a new financial support tool for the 2021-2027 period, aimed at bolstering the digital transformation of society, the economy and public administrations in the EU. With a financial envelope of €7.6 billion (in current prices), a figure 17.5 % lower than the initial Commission proposal, it will build up digital capacity and infrastructure and support a digital single market. The programme will operate mainly through coordinated and strategic co-investments with the Member States in the areas of high-performance computing and data processing, artificial intelligence in the public and private sectors, cybersecurity and trust, advanced digital skills and deployment, best use of digital capacities and interoperability. On 11 May 2021, the regulation establishing the programme entered into force, with retroactive application from 1 January 2021. The programme, dedicated to supporting the digitalisation of Europe and achieving digital sovereignty, is the first-ever such financial instrument at the EU level. Furthermore, in the context of recovery from the pandemic, Member States must allocate at least 20 % of the recovery funds to projects that digitalise their economies and societies. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Programme pour une Europe numérique 2021‑2027

21-04-2021

En 2018, dans le cadre du nouveau cadre financier pluriannuel (CFP) pour la période 2021-2027, la Commission a présenté une proposition de programme visant à renforcer les capacités numériques stratégiques de l’Union (calcul à haute performance, cybersécurité, intelligence artificielle et compétences numériques) et à faciliter le déploiement et l’adoption des technologies numériques dans toute l’Europe. À la suite d’un accord en deuxième lecture anticipée intervenu le 14 décembre 2020, le Parlement ...

En 2018, dans le cadre du nouveau cadre financier pluriannuel (CFP) pour la période 2021-2027, la Commission a présenté une proposition de programme visant à renforcer les capacités numériques stratégiques de l’Union (calcul à haute performance, cybersécurité, intelligence artificielle et compétences numériques) et à faciliter le déploiement et l’adoption des technologies numériques dans toute l’Europe. À la suite d’un accord en deuxième lecture anticipée intervenu le 14 décembre 2020, le Parlement devrait voter sur la proposition en deuxième lecture en avril, mettant ainsi la dernière main à la procédure législative ordinaire.

Digital Services Act

30-03-2021

The IA underpinning the proposal for a Digital services act contains a lot of valuable information and is based on solid sources and broad consultations. However, the analysis could have been more coherent in its problem definition and more specific regarding the practical implementation of the assessed three broad option packages in addition to the status quo. It could have been also more transparent, precise and complete regarding the data and methods used for the analysis, and regarding the quantitative ...

The IA underpinning the proposal for a Digital services act contains a lot of valuable information and is based on solid sources and broad consultations. However, the analysis could have been more coherent in its problem definition and more specific regarding the practical implementation of the assessed three broad option packages in addition to the status quo. It could have been also more transparent, precise and complete regarding the data and methods used for the analysis, and regarding the quantitative estimates (namely in relation to SMEs). Some important information, for instance on liability rules or other elements of digital services, would have been useful in the main text instead of the annexes.

Online platforms: Economic and societal effects

10-03-2021

Online platforms such as Google, Amazon, and Facebook play an increasingly central role in the economy and society. They operate as digital intermediaries across interconnected sectors and markets subject to network effects. These firms have grown to an unprecedented scale, propelled by data-driven business models. Online platforms have a massive impact on individual users and businesses, and are recasting the relationships between customers, advertisers, workers, and employers. This has triggered ...

Online platforms such as Google, Amazon, and Facebook play an increasingly central role in the economy and society. They operate as digital intermediaries across interconnected sectors and markets subject to network effects. These firms have grown to an unprecedented scale, propelled by data-driven business models. Online platforms have a massive impact on individual users and businesses, and are recasting the relationships between customers, advertisers, workers, and employers. This has triggered a public debate on online platforms’ economic dominance and patterns of pervasive data collection. The report provides evidence of positive impact, and documents a set of important issues not fully addressed by existing European regulation and enforcement. The consensus is that there is a need to strengthen the current law enforcement and regulation of the platform economy. This report welcomes the proposed Digital Markets and Digital Services Acts, and offers a series of policy options for competition and innovation, working conditions and labour markets, consumer and societal risks, and environmental sustainability.

Auteur externe

DG, EPRS_This study has been written by Professor Annabelle Gawer, Surrey Business School, University of Surrey (main author), Dr Nick Srnicek, King's College London, at the request of the Panel for the Future of Science and Technology (STOA) and managed by the Scientific Foresight Unit, within the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (EPRS) of the Secretariat of the European Parliament.

Digital services act

03-03-2021

The rules governing the provision of digital services in the EU have remained largely unchanged since the adoption of the e-Commerce Directive in 2000, while digital technologies and business models continue to evolve rapidly and new societal challenges are emerging, such as the spread of counterfeit goods, hate speech and disinformation online. Against this backdrop, in December 2020, the European Commission tabled a new legislative proposal on a digital services act to amend the e-Commerce Directive ...

The rules governing the provision of digital services in the EU have remained largely unchanged since the adoption of the e-Commerce Directive in 2000, while digital technologies and business models continue to evolve rapidly and new societal challenges are emerging, such as the spread of counterfeit goods, hate speech and disinformation online. Against this backdrop, in December 2020, the European Commission tabled a new legislative proposal on a digital services act to amend the e-Commerce Directive and set higher standards of transparency and accountability to govern the way platform service providers moderate content, on advertising and on algorithmic processes. Parliament has already voiced strong support for revision of the EU rules applicable to online actors. EU lawmakers will now assess whether the Commission's proposal is an appropriate response to the challenges identified and will work towards defining Parliament's own position on the proposal, which is the first step in the EU's interinstitutional legislative process.

Villages intelligents: Concept, enjeux et perspectives pour les zones rurales de l’Union européenne

01-03-2021

Bien qu'il ne soit pas juridiquement défini dans la législation de l’Union, le concept de «village intelligent» présente un certain nombre de caractéristiques, parmi lesquelles la participation de la communauté locale et l’utilisation d’outils numériques font figure d’éléments essentiels. Dans le cadre de ce concept, la population locale participe à l'action en faveur de l’amélioration de ses conditions économiques, sociales ou environnementales, de la coopération avec d’autres communautés, de l’ ...

Bien qu'il ne soit pas juridiquement défini dans la législation de l’Union, le concept de «village intelligent» présente un certain nombre de caractéristiques, parmi lesquelles la participation de la communauté locale et l’utilisation d’outils numériques font figure d’éléments essentiels. Dans le cadre de ce concept, la population locale participe à l'action en faveur de l’amélioration de ses conditions économiques, sociales ou environnementales, de la coopération avec d’autres communautés, de l’innovation sociale et de l’élaboration de stratégies de village intelligent. Les technologies numériques peuvent s’appliquer à de nombreux aspects de la vie et du travail en zone rurale. Le concept de village intelligent table également sur l'adoption de solutions intelligentes, dans le secteur public comme dans le secteur privé, dans un large éventail de champs d'action tels l’amélioration de l’accès aux services, la mise en place de chaînes d’approvisionnement alimentaire courtes ou le développement des sources d’énergie renouvelable. Le concept de village intelligent suscite de plus en plus d'intérêt dans le domaine du développement rural, une évolution qui coïncide avec la réforme en cours de la politique agricole commune (PAC). Cette réforme s’appuiera notamment sur un nouveau modèle de mise en œuvre basé sur l’élaboration, par chaque État membre, d’un plan stratégique relevant de la PAC. En décembre 2020, la Commission a publié ses recommandations à l’attention des États membres pour leur indiquer la direction que doivent prendre leurs plans en vue d’atteindre les objectifs de la PAC et du pacte vert pour l’Europe. L’analyse de la Commission met en évidence les lacunes que les États membres doivent combler pour atteindre l’objectif du pacte vert de parvenir à un taux de couverture de 100 % pour l’internet à haut débit dans les zones rurales d’ici 2025. Les résultats obtenus dépendront dans une large mesure de la manière dont les États membres tiendront compte des recommandations de la Commission dans l’élaboration de leurs plans stratégiques relevant de la PAC. Le Parlement européen a apporté une contribution importante au concept de village intelligent en participant à un projet pilote sur les écovillages intelligents et en soutenant, en 2017, le plan d’action de la Commission européenne pour des villages plus intelligents. Entre-temps, le Comité européen des régions et le Comité économique et social européen ont tous deux affiché leur soutien au concept au moyen de divers événements, avis et communications.

Research for CULT Committee - Cultural and creative sectors in post-COVID-19 Europe – crisis effects and policy recommendations

25-02-2021

Cultural and creative sectors (CCS) have been hit hard by the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study analyses the so far effects of the crisis on the CCS, as well as the policy responses that are formulated to support the sectors. Based on the analysis, policy recommendations are formulated to further improve the resilience of the CCS in Europe in the medium and longer term.

Cultural and creative sectors (CCS) have been hit hard by the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study analyses the so far effects of the crisis on the CCS, as well as the policy responses that are formulated to support the sectors. Based on the analysis, policy recommendations are formulated to further improve the resilience of the CCS in Europe in the medium and longer term.

Auteur externe

IDEA Consult: Isabelle De Voldere, Martina Fraioli, Eveline Durinck Goethe-Institut: Antonia Blau, Sina Lebert Inforelais: Sylvia Amann Values of Culture&Creativity: Joost Heinsius

Dix questions essentielles à suivre en 2021

06-01-2021

Cette cinquième édition de la publication annuelle de l’EPRS vise à proposer un éclairage sur les problématiques et domaines d’action clés susceptibles de figurer parmi les priorités politiques de l’Union européenne au cours de l’année à venir. Les sujets analysés sont la course au vaccin contre la COVID-19, le plan de relance, l’accès à la nourriture, les inégalités, les difficultés rencontrées par la culture et les arts du spectacle, un coup d’accélérateur numérique pour l’économie circulaire, ...

Cette cinquième édition de la publication annuelle de l’EPRS vise à proposer un éclairage sur les problématiques et domaines d’action clés susceptibles de figurer parmi les priorités politiques de l’Union européenne au cours de l’année à venir. Les sujets analysés sont la course au vaccin contre la COVID-19, le plan de relance, l’accès à la nourriture, les inégalités, les difficultés rencontrées par la culture et les arts du spectacle, un coup d’accélérateur numérique pour l’économie circulaire, les matières premières critiques, les contrôles aux frontières, la Turquie et la Méditerranée orientale, et la nouvelle administration américaine.

Critical raw materials for the EU: Enablers of the green and digital recovery

18-12-2020

The pandemic has highlighted the risk involved, including for the EU, in relying heavily on external suppliers. The EU's 30 critical raw materials (CRMs) combine two characteristics: they are strategically important for its industry and economy, and there are high risks associated with securing their supply. The notion of strategic autonomy, which has been gaining track recently, calls for a more autonomous and independent EU policy, also in the area of CRMs. Importantly, the core of the EU's response ...

The pandemic has highlighted the risk involved, including for the EU, in relying heavily on external suppliers. The EU's 30 critical raw materials (CRMs) combine two characteristics: they are strategically important for its industry and economy, and there are high risks associated with securing their supply. The notion of strategic autonomy, which has been gaining track recently, calls for a more autonomous and independent EU policy, also in the area of CRMs. Importantly, the core of the EU's response to the pandemic has been to use it to transform its economy and society. The twin transition to a green and digital future relies particularly on the safe and diverse supply of CRMs. In its journey to a low-carbon economy, the EU should however make sure it does not replace its reliance on fossil fuels with a reliance on CRMs. While secure access to CRMs has been on the EU agenda for many years, the European Commission has eagerly stepped up its policy in this area since the beginning of its current term, and in September 2020 delivered a new package of measures. These included a new action plan for CRMs that supports initiatives in four main areas: i) developing resilient value chains for EU industrial ecosystems; ii) supporting sustainable and environmentally friendly domestic mining and processing of raw materials in the EU extraction (with priority given to former coal-mining regions); iii) weakening dependency on primary CRMs through better circular use of resources, environmentally friendly products and innovation; and iv) diversifying supply with sustainable and responsible sourcing from third countries. The EU has also launched the European Raw Materials Alliance, joining together the industry, researchers, Member States and civil society to close the main gaps in the value chains. The European Parliament has been a long-standing supporter of boosting all the elements of CRMs value chains to ensure the security of supply and weaken unwanted dependencies.

Taxation of the digital economy: Latest developments

15-12-2020

There is an important ongoing debate on the direct and indirect taxation of the digital economy. Proposals on digital taxes, which are under negotiation in the OECD, are inter-linked with European Commission proposals on the same subject. As the Council did not reach an agreement on the Commission proposal for a digital services tax, national initiatives appeared in the interim until a global solution in the area of direct taxation could be found in the OECD. On 1 December 2020, the Council endorsed ...

There is an important ongoing debate on the direct and indirect taxation of the digital economy. Proposals on digital taxes, which are under negotiation in the OECD, are inter-linked with European Commission proposals on the same subject. As the Council did not reach an agreement on the Commission proposal for a digital services tax, national initiatives appeared in the interim until a global solution in the area of direct taxation could be found in the OECD. On 1 December 2020, the Council endorsed the text of amendments to the Directive on Administrative Cooperation between the Member States (known as DAC7), which will oblige digital platform operators to provide information on the operations they intermediate. If an agreement is not achieved at global level by July 2021, it could trigger an EU response in the form of a digital levy. There is also a debate on whether that levy should be similar to the Commission proposal that failed to get political backing or not.

Evénements à venir

21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Inside the room - Shaping Europe, 1992-2010
Autre événement -
EPRS
21-09-2021
Putting the 'e' in e-health
Atelier -
STOA
27-09-2021
Turning the tide on cancer: the national parliaments' view on Europe's Cancer Plan
Autre événement -
BECA

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