15

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Mot-clé
Date

Understanding the EU response to organised crime

31-08-2020

The EU has made substantial progress in terms of protecting its citizens since the early 1990s, often in response to dramatic incidents, such as mafia or other organised crime group murders, big money-laundering scandals, a steep increase in migrant smuggling and trafficking in human beings following the 2015 migration crisis, or – more recently – a sharp rise in cybercrime, fraud and counterfeiting during the coronavirus pandemic. Criminal organisations continue to pose big risks to the internal ...

The EU has made substantial progress in terms of protecting its citizens since the early 1990s, often in response to dramatic incidents, such as mafia or other organised crime group murders, big money-laundering scandals, a steep increase in migrant smuggling and trafficking in human beings following the 2015 migration crisis, or – more recently – a sharp rise in cybercrime, fraud and counterfeiting during the coronavirus pandemic. Criminal organisations continue to pose big risks to the internal security of the EU. A rising number of organised crime groups are active in its territory, often with cross-border reach. Organised crime is furthermore an increasingly dynamic and complex phenomenon, with new criminal markets and modi operandi emerging under the influence of globalisation and – in particular – new technologies. While the impact of serious and organised crime on the EU economy is considerable, there are also significant political and social costs, as well as negative effects on the wellbeing of EU citizens. As organised crime has become more interconnected, international and digital, Member States – which remain responsible for operational activities in the area of police and judicial cooperation – increasingly rely on cross-border and EU-level cooperation to support their law enforcement authorities on the ground. Recognising the severity of the problem and the need for coordinated action, the EU has initiated several measures to encourage closer cooperation between Member States and adopted common legal, judicial and investigative frameworks to address organised crime. Parliament has made fighting organised crime a political priority and has helped shape the relevant EU legislation. Future EU action will focus on implementing existing rules, improving operational cooperation – even beyond the EU’s boundaries – and information-sharing, as well as addressing some of the main criminal activities of organised crime groups. Furthermore, the EU aims to make sure that crime does not pay.

Fight against fraud: Pericles 2020, Hercule III and AFIS

09-04-2019

Pericles 2020 is an exchange, assistance and training programme for the protection of the euro against counterfeiting. Hercule III is a programme aimed at supporting action to combat irregularities, fraud and corruption affecting the EU budget. AFIS is a collection of applications for the exchange of anti-fraud information between OLAF and national administrations.

Pericles 2020 is an exchange, assistance and training programme for the protection of the euro against counterfeiting. Hercule III is a programme aimed at supporting action to combat irregularities, fraud and corruption affecting the EU budget. AFIS is a collection of applications for the exchange of anti-fraud information between OLAF and national administrations.

Virtual currencies in the Eurosystem: challenges ahead

16-07-2018

Speculation on Bitcoin, the evolution of money in the digital age, and the underlying blockchain technology are attracting growing interest. In the context of the Eurosystem, this briefing paper analyses the legal nature of privately issued virtual currencies (VCs), the implications of VCs for central bank’s monetary policy and monopoly of note issue, and the risks for the financial system at large. The paper also considers some of the proposals concerning central bank issued virtual currencies. ...

Speculation on Bitcoin, the evolution of money in the digital age, and the underlying blockchain technology are attracting growing interest. In the context of the Eurosystem, this briefing paper analyses the legal nature of privately issued virtual currencies (VCs), the implications of VCs for central bank’s monetary policy and monopoly of note issue, and the risks for the financial system at large. The paper also considers some of the proposals concerning central bank issued virtual currencies. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs.

Auteur externe

Rosa María LASTRA, Jason Grant ALLEN

Guarantee Fund for External Action and EIB external lending mandate

16-05-2018

In response to a sharp increase in the number of people trying to migrate to Europe illegally, and as part of the mid-term review of the European Investment Bank's external lending mandate (ELM), the Commission proposed an external investment plan to tackle the root causes of migration from countries neighbouring the European Union, consisting of a European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD) and quantitative and qualitative changes to the ELM. These changes entailed two legislative proposals ...

In response to a sharp increase in the number of people trying to migrate to Europe illegally, and as part of the mid-term review of the European Investment Bank's external lending mandate (ELM), the Commission proposed an external investment plan to tackle the root causes of migration from countries neighbouring the European Union, consisting of a European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD) and quantitative and qualitative changes to the ELM. These changes entailed two legislative proposals. A compromise package was agreed in trilogue between Council and Parliament, and adopted at first reading during the February I 2018 plenary session. Both acts entered into force on 8 April 2018. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Combating fraud and counterfeiting of non-cash means of payment

08-12-2017

The IA presents the problem of non-cash payment fraud in a coherent and clear manner. The link between the problem (sub-) drivers, specific and general objectives of the proposal is rather straightforward. The objectives could be more specific and time-bound, however, to bring them in line with the SMART criteria. The IA sets out the content of all options in a clear manner. However, the quality of data, analysis and stakeholder consultation leaves an overall poor impression, partly because the combined ...

The IA presents the problem of non-cash payment fraud in a coherent and clear manner. The link between the problem (sub-) drivers, specific and general objectives of the proposal is rather straightforward. The objectives could be more specific and time-bound, however, to bring them in line with the SMART criteria. The IA sets out the content of all options in a clear manner. However, the quality of data, analysis and stakeholder consultation leaves an overall poor impression, partly because the combined IA and evaluation study, which is the external expertise informing the assessment, is not available online and therefore impossible to verify. For instance, according to the IA, the qualitative scores were validated with the focus group participants and external reviewers; however, the results of the validations are not reported in the IA report and only seven stakeholders attended the focus group. Such low attendance is rather surprising, considering that the qualitative assessment was given particular weight when deciding on the preferred option. The IA provides a rather inconsistent synopsis of the three consultation processes and the stakeholders’ contributions are not available online. The IA does not make clear what the stakeholders’ views were on the retained or discarded measures and options. Making the study accessible online could perhaps provide the information needed to understand the logic behind the assessment, the stakeholder consultation and the choice of the preferred option.

Auteur externe

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Organised crime in the European Union

06-09-2013

It is impossible to measure accurately the socio-economic cost of crime. However, the estimates available invariably quote very high figures, which lead to reflection in times of financial crisis and austerity. Numerous organised crime groups are active in the EU, often with cross-border reach and multi-ethnic composition. Some of them, having established a strong position in their countries of origin, go on to engage in illicit markets throughout the EU.

It is impossible to measure accurately the socio-economic cost of crime. However, the estimates available invariably quote very high figures, which lead to reflection in times of financial crisis and austerity. Numerous organised crime groups are active in the EU, often with cross-border reach and multi-ethnic composition. Some of them, having established a strong position in their countries of origin, go on to engage in illicit markets throughout the EU.

Customs enforcement of intellectual property rights

06-06-2013

During the past ten years the number of shipments detained due to suspected infringement of intellectual property rights (IPR) has been rising sharply. To prevent counterfeits from entering the EU market, the European Commission (EC) has proposed to revise existing customs regulation by broadening its scope and simplifying procedures for their destruction.

During the past ten years the number of shipments detained due to suspected infringement of intellectual property rights (IPR) has been rising sharply. To prevent counterfeits from entering the EU market, the European Commission (EC) has proposed to revise existing customs regulation by broadening its scope and simplifying procedures for their destruction.

Protection pénale de l'euro et des autres monnaies contre la contrefaçon : première évaluation de l'analyse d'impact de la Commission européenne

15-05-2013

Cette note vise à effectuer une première évaluation des forces et des faiblesses de l'analyse de l'impact de la Commission accompagnant sa proposition de directive du Parlement européen et du Conseil relative à la protection pénale de l'euro et des autres monnaies contre la contrefaçon, et remplaçant la décision cadre 2000/383/JAI du Conseil (COM (2013) 42 final), présentée le 5 février 2013.

Cette note vise à effectuer une première évaluation des forces et des faiblesses de l'analyse de l'impact de la Commission accompagnant sa proposition de directive du Parlement européen et du Conseil relative à la protection pénale de l'euro et des autres monnaies contre la contrefaçon, et remplaçant la décision cadre 2000/383/JAI du Conseil (COM (2013) 42 final), présentée le 5 février 2013.

Criminal penalties for counterfeiting the euro

11-03-2013

Since 2002, when euro notes and coins were introduced, numerous investigations have revealed the existence of illegal print shops and mints producing fakes, despite EU instruments to combat this. The Lisbon Treaty created new possibilities to fight counterfeiting of the euro through EU legislation. On this basis, the Commission proposed, in February 2013, a Directive using criminal law to protect the euro and other currencies against counterfeiting.

Since 2002, when euro notes and coins were introduced, numerous investigations have revealed the existence of illegal print shops and mints producing fakes, despite EU instruments to combat this. The Lisbon Treaty created new possibilities to fight counterfeiting of the euro through EU legislation. On this basis, the Commission proposed, in February 2013, a Directive using criminal law to protect the euro and other currencies against counterfeiting.

ACTA - Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement

29-06-2012

The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) is a plurilateral agreement between the EU, its Member States (MS) and ten other countries, including the USA and Japan.

The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) is a plurilateral agreement between the EU, its Member States (MS) and ten other countries, including the USA and Japan.

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