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Date

Digital sovereignty for Europe

02-07-2020

There is growing concern that the citizens, businesses and Member States of the European Union (EU) are gradually losing control over their data, over their capacity for innovation, and over their ability to shape and enforce legislation in the digital environment. Against this background, support has been growing for a new policy approach designed to enhance Europe's strategic autonomy in the digital field. This would require the Union to update and adapt a number of its current legal, regulatory ...

There is growing concern that the citizens, businesses and Member States of the European Union (EU) are gradually losing control over their data, over their capacity for innovation, and over their ability to shape and enforce legislation in the digital environment. Against this background, support has been growing for a new policy approach designed to enhance Europe's strategic autonomy in the digital field. This would require the Union to update and adapt a number of its current legal, regulatory and financial instruments, and to promote more actively European values and principles in areas such as data protection, cybersecurity and ethically designed artificial intelligence (AI). This paper explains the context of the emerging quest for 'digital sovereignty', which the coronavirus pandemic now seems to have accelerated, and provides an overview of the measures currently being discussed and/or proposed to enhance European autonomy in the digital field.

The Unified Patent Court after Brexit

11-03-2020

Great Britain has recently made known that it does not intend to apply the International Agreement on a Unified Patent Court (UPCA).

Great Britain has recently made known that it does not intend to apply the International Agreement on a Unified Patent Court (UPCA).

What if we could fight coronavirus with artificial intelligence?

10-03-2020

Αs coronavirus spreads, raising fears of a worldwide pandemic, international organisations and scientists are using artificial intelligence to track the epidemic in real-time, effectively predict where the virus might appear next and develop effective responses. Its multifaceted applications in the frame of this public health emergency raise questions about the legal and ethical soundness of its implementation.

Αs coronavirus spreads, raising fears of a worldwide pandemic, international organisations and scientists are using artificial intelligence to track the epidemic in real-time, effectively predict where the virus might appear next and develop effective responses. Its multifaceted applications in the frame of this public health emergency raise questions about the legal and ethical soundness of its implementation.

What if internet by satellite were to lead to congestion in orbit?

05-02-2020

American Starlink project aims to bring high speed internet access across the globe by 2021. It’s certainly a mission in the sky! But how will Elon Musk’s plans to deploy this mega constellation of satellites impact on European citizens?

American Starlink project aims to bring high speed internet access across the globe by 2021. It’s certainly a mission in the sky! But how will Elon Musk’s plans to deploy this mega constellation of satellites impact on European citizens?

Policy Departments' Monthly Highlights - November 2019

26-11-2019

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

Geographical indications for non-agricultural products

07-11-2019

This Cost of Non-Europe report seeks to quantify the costs arising from the lack of European Union (EU) legislation protecting Geographical Indications (GIs) for non-agricultural products and to analyse the benefits foregone for citizens, businesses and Member States. The report estimates that introducing EU-wide GI protection for non-agricultural products would have an overall positive effect on trade, employment and rural development. More precisely, after approximately 20 years of implementation ...

This Cost of Non-Europe report seeks to quantify the costs arising from the lack of European Union (EU) legislation protecting Geographical Indications (GIs) for non-agricultural products and to analyse the benefits foregone for citizens, businesses and Member States. The report estimates that introducing EU-wide GI protection for non-agricultural products would have an overall positive effect on trade, employment and rural development. More precisely, after approximately 20 years of implementation, such a protection scheme would yield an overall expected increase in intra-EU trade of about 4.9-6.6 % of current exports (€37.6-50 billion) in the more relevant sectors. Expectations are that regional-level employment would rise by 0.12-0.14 % and that 284 000-338 000 new jobs would be created in the EU as a whole. The expected positive impact on rural development would materialise, among other things, through direct support for locally based high-quality producers, rural economic diversification and local producers' capacity to organise collectively.

How the General Data Protection Regulation changes the rules for scientific research

24-07-2019

The implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) raises a series of challenges for scientific research, especially regarding research that is dependent on data. This study investigates the promises and challenges associated with the implementation of the GDPR in the scientific domain and examines the adequacy of the GDPR exceptions for scientific research in terms of safeguarding scientific freedom and technological progress.

The implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) raises a series of challenges for scientific research, especially regarding research that is dependent on data. This study investigates the promises and challenges associated with the implementation of the GDPR in the scientific domain and examines the adequacy of the GDPR exceptions for scientific research in terms of safeguarding scientific freedom and technological progress.

Auteur externe

DG, EPRS; This study has been conducted by the Health Ethics and Policy Lab, ETH Zurich

Contracts for the supply of digital content and digital services

15-07-2019

The directive on contracts for the supply of digital content and digital services, proposed by the European Commission in 2015, harmonises some private-law aspects of such contracts at EU level for the first time. The directive will not fully harmonise the duration of legal guarantees for digital content and services, but national laws will not be allowed limit it to less than two years. For the first year from delivery, the burden of proof will be on the supplier. Traders will be required to provide ...

The directive on contracts for the supply of digital content and digital services, proposed by the European Commission in 2015, harmonises some private-law aspects of such contracts at EU level for the first time. The directive will not fully harmonise the duration of legal guarantees for digital content and services, but national laws will not be allowed limit it to less than two years. For the first year from delivery, the burden of proof will be on the supplier. Traders will be required to provide necessary updates. The directive will also establish what remedies consumers are entitled to and the order in which they can be used. Although the European Parliament proposed that the directive should cover embedded digital content as well, following negotiations with the Council, the co-legislators agreed that such content will be regulated by the new directive on sale of goods. The directive on contracts for the supply of digital content and digital services was formally signed into law in May 2019 and Member States have to apply its measures from 1 January 2022. Sixth edition of a briefing originally drafted by Rafał Mańko. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view previous editions of this briefing, please see: PE 635.601 (March 2019).

Les politiques de l’Union – Au service des citoyens: La transformation numérique

28-06-2019

Une révolution numérique est en cours, qui transforme le monde tel que nous le connaissons à une vitesse inouïe. Les technologies numériques ont changé non seulement la façon dont évoluent les entreprises, mais aussi celle dont les gens se connectent, échangent des informations et interagissent avec les secteurs public et privé. Les entreprises et citoyens européens ont besoin d’un cadre politique adéquat ainsi que de compétences et d’infrastructures appropriées pour tirer parti de l’énorme valeur ...

Une révolution numérique est en cours, qui transforme le monde tel que nous le connaissons à une vitesse inouïe. Les technologies numériques ont changé non seulement la façon dont évoluent les entreprises, mais aussi celle dont les gens se connectent, échangent des informations et interagissent avec les secteurs public et privé. Les entreprises et citoyens européens ont besoin d’un cadre politique adéquat ainsi que de compétences et d’infrastructures appropriées pour tirer parti de l’énorme valeur générée par l’économie numérique et assurer le succès de la transformation numérique. L’Union européenne joue un rôle prépondérant dans la définition de l’économie numérique, grâce à différentes initiatives politiques, qui vont de la promotion de l’investissement dans la réforme du droit de l’Union à des actions non législatives visant à améliorer la coordination et l’échange de bonnes pratiques des États membres. La législature 2014-2019 a vu se concrétiser un certain nombre d’initiatives dans les domaines de la numérisation de l’industrie et des services publics, des investissements dans les infrastructures et services numériques, dans les programmes de recherche, dans la cybersécurité, dans le commerce électronique, dans le droit d’auteur et dans la législation sur la protection des données. Les citoyens de l’Union sont de plus en plus conscients du rôle important que les technologies numériques jouent dans leur vie quotidienne. Selon un rapport de 2017, deux tiers des Européens affirment que ces technologies ont des conséquences positives sur la société, sur l’économie et sur leurs propres vies, mais qu’elles s’accompagnent néanmoins de nouveaux défis. La majorité des répondants estiment en effet que l’Union européenne, les autorités des États membres et les entreprises doivent prendre des mesures pour remédier aux conséquences de ces technologies. La récente proposition du programme «Europe numérique» (pour la période 2021-2027), premier programme de financement exclusivement consacré au soutien de la transformation numérique dans l’Union, montre que cette dernière entend renforcer son soutien à la transformation numérique dans les années à venir. De nouvelles mesures seront sans doute nécessaires, notamment en vue d’accroître les investissements dans les infrastructures, de stimuler l’innovation, d’encourager les champions du numérique et la numérisation des entreprises, de réduire les fractures numériques, de supprimer les obstacles restants au marché unique numérique et de garantir un cadre juridique et réglementaire adapté dans les domaines de l’informatique de pointe et des données, de l’intelligence artificielle et de la cybersécurité. Le Parlement européen, en tant que colégislateur, participe très étroitement à la conception du cadre politique qui aidera les citoyens et les entreprises à exploiter pleinement le potentiel des technologies numériques. Le présent document est une mise à jour d’un briefing plus ancien, publié avant les élections européennes de 2019.

What if policy anticipated advances in science and technology?

26-06-2019

What if blockchain revolutionised voting? What if your emotions were tracked to spy on you? And what if we genetically engineered an entire species? Science and policy are intricately connected. Via monthly 'What if' publications, the Scientific Foresight Unit (STOA; part of the European Parliamentary Research Service) draws Members of the European Parliament's attention to new scientific and technological developments relevant for policy-making. The unit also provides administrative support to the ...

What if blockchain revolutionised voting? What if your emotions were tracked to spy on you? And what if we genetically engineered an entire species? Science and policy are intricately connected. Via monthly 'What if' publications, the Scientific Foresight Unit (STOA; part of the European Parliamentary Research Service) draws Members of the European Parliament's attention to new scientific and technological developments relevant for policy-making. The unit also provides administrative support to the Panel for the Future of Science and Technology (STOA), which brings together 25 Members from nine different parliamentary committees who share a strong interest in science and technology in the context of policy-making.

Evénements à venir

28-09-2020
Seventh meeting of the Joint Parliamentary Scrutiny Group (JPSG) on Europol
Autre événement -
LIBE
29-09-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | Working for Obama and Clinton on Europe [...]
Autre événement -
EPRS
30-09-2020
EPRS online policy roundtable: Plastics and the circular economy
Autre événement -
EPRS

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