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The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Lithuania finalised its NECP in December 2019. Lithuania generates 0.55 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. Most economic sectors showed emissions reductions in the 2005-2019 ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Croatia's final NECP is from December 2019. Croatia generates 0.7 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The country's emissions intensity is significantly higher than the EU ...

How technology has shaped society and how future technologies might affect it in the years to come are subjects for frequent debate. It can be tempting in this context to think of technologies as neutral 'things' that can be used for good or bad depending on the user's intentions and skills. But what if technologies were social objects that reflected and reinforced human activities or even political values? In fact, while mechanisms, effects and implications remain open to debate, experts on the ...

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports ...

Bioenergy, which is generally produced from plants such as agricultural crops or trees, comes in various forms. Wood and other solid biomass are commonly used for heating and electricity generation. Liquid biofuels for transport and other purposes are mainly made from food and feed crops, but can also be produced from waste and residues. Bioenergy can also be delivered in the form of gas. Bioenergy is a renewable but finite energy source, and considered as climate-friendly because the carbon which ...

The EU has set a target to replace 10% of transport fuel of every EU country by fuels from renewable sources by 2020. In 2015, 6.7% of final energy used in the EU-28 came from renewable sources. However, efforts will have to increase in order to meet the 10% renewable energy target in 2020. delegation to the Porto Marghera refinery in Venice on 17-19 July 2017. An ENVI delegation is to visit the world’s first example of the conversion of a conventional refinery into a bio-refinery able to transform ...

Despite its considerable length and a rather large number of options (over 30), the IA report could have delivered a more coherent, comprehensive, and persuasive analysis. The internal logic of the report and the arrangement of options is at times hard to understand because the options are linked to challenges rather than to clearly defined problems and objectives. Furthermore, the absence of preferred options makes it difficult to assess the usefulness of the impact assessment in informing the political ...

Road transport remains significantly more dependent on fossil fuels than other sectors. In the early 2000s, biofuels appeared as a way to reduce this dependency and to cut greenhouse gas emissions. However, when greenhouse gas emission reductions through using conventional biofuels were called into question because of the indirect effects involved, advanced biofuels emerged as an alternative. Although the advanced biofuels sector has been facing technological challenges and economic difficulties, ...

Renewable energy

Bileoga Eolais AE 01-06-2017

Renewable sources of energy (wind power, solar power, hydroelectric power, ocean energy, geothermal energy, biomass and biofuels) are alternatives to fossil fuels that contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, diversifying energy supply and reducing dependence on unreliable and volatile fossil fuel markets, in particular oil and gas. EU legislation on the promotion of renewables has evolved significantly in recent years. The future policy framework for the post-2020 period is under discussion ...

This paper analyses the development of renewable energy sources (RES) in the EU, with a focus on support mechanisms at the EU and Member State level, including current and upcoming reforms. It presents the principal support mechanisms for RES, as well as developments in selected Member States, outlines the main technical and regulatory challenges associated with an increasing share of renewable energy and highlights the involvement and positions of the European Parliament. The development of renewable ...