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Mechanism to resolve legal and administrative obstacles in a cross-border context

09-11-2021

Often isolated, and with generally poorer access to public services, the EU's border regions face a unique set of challenges. This has been recognised under Article 174 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, which provides that particular attention should be paid to cross-border regions when developing action to strengthen the EU's economic, social and territorial cohesion. Yet while the EU has provided significant support over the years, particularly within the framework of European ...

Often isolated, and with generally poorer access to public services, the EU's border regions face a unique set of challenges. This has been recognised under Article 174 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, which provides that particular attention should be paid to cross-border regions when developing action to strengthen the EU's economic, social and territorial cohesion. Yet while the EU has provided significant support over the years, particularly within the framework of European territorial cooperation, helping to strengthen connectivity and create new growth and jobs, numerous obstacles continue to hamper cross-border cooperation. The Commission's 2015 cross-border review revealed legal and administrative barriers to be the main obstacle to cross-border cooperation while, in parallel, the 2015 Luxembourg Presidency put forward plans for an EU cross-border mechanism, with both processes feeding into discussions on a mechanism for cross-border areas, culminating in the present proposal. The EP adopted its first-reading position on the proposal in February 2019, yet progress has been slow, with the Council's Working Party on Structural Measures deciding to cease work on the proposal in May 2021.

Building up resilience to cross-border health threats: Moving towards a European health union

01-10-2021

On 11 November 2020, the European Commission put forward a proposal for a regulation on serious cross-border threats to health. In the light of lessons learned from the coronavirus crisis, it aims to strengthen the EU's health security by revising Decision 1082/2013/EU (the 'Cross-Border Health Threats Decision'). The proposal was presented in a package that also includes proposals to strengthen the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA), ...

On 11 November 2020, the European Commission put forward a proposal for a regulation on serious cross-border threats to health. In the light of lessons learned from the coronavirus crisis, it aims to strengthen the EU's health security by revising Decision 1082/2013/EU (the 'Cross-Border Health Threats Decision'). The proposal was presented in a package that also includes proposals to strengthen the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA), as first steps towards a European health union. Stakeholders widely welcome the proposal and the package. Some say it could be improved further, suggesting concrete elements, while others think it should go beyond crisis preparedness. Still others consider it a springboard to a bigger role for the European Union (EU) in health. The European Parliament has repeatedly called for stronger cooperation on health, for a new regulation to replace the Cross-Border Health Threats Decision, and for revised mandates of both the ECDC and the EMA. Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety is responsible for the file. The report was adopted in committee on 13 July 2021. The Council agreed its position on 23 July 2021. Parliament voted the committee report in plenary on 15 September 2021, thereby setting its negotiating mandate and opening the way for interinstitutional negotiations. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

European territorial cooperation (Interreg) 2021-2027

20-09-2021

On 29 May 2018, the European Commission adopted several proposals aimed at defining the EU cohesion policy for the post-2020 programming period. The package includes a proposal for the new generation of European territorial cooperation (ETC) programmes, commonly referred to as 'Interreg'. The proposed regulation would bring significant changes to the architecture of ETC, with the reshaping of the three traditional cooperation strands (i.e. cross-border, transnational and interregional cooperation ...

On 29 May 2018, the European Commission adopted several proposals aimed at defining the EU cohesion policy for the post-2020 programming period. The package includes a proposal for the new generation of European territorial cooperation (ETC) programmes, commonly referred to as 'Interreg'. The proposed regulation would bring significant changes to the architecture of ETC, with the reshaping of the three traditional cooperation strands (i.e. cross-border, transnational and interregional cooperation) and the creation of two new components, one dedicated to outermost regions, the other to interregional cooperation on innovation. Another major novelty is the incorporation of cooperation with countries other than EU Member States. The proposal was examined simultaneously by the Council and the European Parliament. In Parliament, the Committee on Regional Development (REGI) was responsible for the file. Parliament adopted its legislative resolution on the proposal at first reading on 26 March 2019, enabling trilogue negotiations to get under way with the Council. Agreement on the text was reached at the trilogue meeting of 2 December 2020, with Parliament adopting the draft regulation on 23 June 2021. Signed on 24 June 2021, the final act was published in the EU Official Journal on 30 June 2021.

Boosting cooperation on health technology assessment

15-07-2021

The European Commission has proposed a regulation on health technology assessment (HTA). HTA is a research-based tool that supports decision-making in healthcare by assessing the added value of a given health technology compared to others. The proposal would provide the basis for permanent EU-level cooperation in four areas. Member States would still be responsible for assessing the non-clinical (economic, ethical, social, etc.) aspects of health technology, and for pricing and reimbursement. While ...

The European Commission has proposed a regulation on health technology assessment (HTA). HTA is a research-based tool that supports decision-making in healthcare by assessing the added value of a given health technology compared to others. The proposal would provide the basis for permanent EU-level cooperation in four areas. Member States would still be responsible for assessing the non-clinical (economic, ethical, social, etc.) aspects of health technology, and for pricing and reimbursement. While Member States could choose to delay participation in the joint work until three years after the rules enter into force, it would become mandatory after six years. Stakeholders broadly welcomed the Commission proposal. National parliaments, however, are divided in their appreciation of it. The provisional agreement, applauded by some stakeholders, has been criticised by the pharmaceutical industry, in particular, for its lack of ambition. The European Parliament adopted its final position at first reading on 14 February 2019. In the Council, work was carried out under seven consecutive presidencies. On 24 March 2021, the co-legislators reached a provisional agreement in interinstitutional trilogue negotiations. The Council's Permanent Representatives Committee endorsed the provisional agreement on 30 June 2021. Parliament's ENVI committee voted in favour of the text on 13 July 2021. Council and then Parliament are expected to formally adopt it in the coming months. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

European Medicines Agency mandate extension

01-07-2021

On 11 November 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal to strengthen the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The proposed regulation would allow the EMA, among other things, to better anticipate possible shortages of medicinal products and ensure their timely development, with the aim of improving the EU's capacity to respond to health emergencies. The European Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety adopted its report on 22 June 2021. This is due to be voted ...

On 11 November 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal to strengthen the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The proposed regulation would allow the EMA, among other things, to better anticipate possible shortages of medicinal products and ensure their timely development, with the aim of improving the EU's capacity to respond to health emergencies. The European Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety adopted its report on 22 June 2021. This is due to be voted during the July plenary session, thus setting Parliament's negotiating position and opening the way for interinstitutional negotiations.

European territorial cooperation (ETC)

21-06-2021

Better known as Interreg, European territorial cooperation is one of the most visible examples of how EU Member States can work together for the common good. Gradually growing in importance since its creation 30 years ago, its budget has increased tenfold in this period, with ETC acquiring its own regulation for 2014-2020. The proposal for a new ETC regulation is part of the post 2020 cohesion package, with the European Parliament expected to vote at second reading at its June II plenary session ...

Better known as Interreg, European territorial cooperation is one of the most visible examples of how EU Member States can work together for the common good. Gradually growing in importance since its creation 30 years ago, its budget has increased tenfold in this period, with ETC acquiring its own regulation for 2014-2020. The proposal for a new ETC regulation is part of the post 2020 cohesion package, with the European Parliament expected to vote at second reading at its June II plenary session on the text agreed during interinstitutional negotiations.

Computerised system for communication in cross-border judicial proceedings (e-CODEX)

14-06-2021

The e-CODEX system is the digital backbone of EU judicial cooperation in civil and criminal matters. e-CODEX comprises a package of software products that allow the setting up of a network of access points for secure digital communication between courts and between citizens and the courts, while also enabling the secure exchange of judicial documents. The project, which was launched in 2010 with EU grant funding, is managed by a consortium of Member States and other organisations and is coordinated ...

The e-CODEX system is the digital backbone of EU judicial cooperation in civil and criminal matters. e-CODEX comprises a package of software products that allow the setting up of a network of access points for secure digital communication between courts and between citizens and the courts, while also enabling the secure exchange of judicial documents. The project, which was launched in 2010 with EU grant funding, is managed by a consortium of Member States and other organisations and is coordinated by the Ministry of Justice of the German Land of North Rhine-Westphalia. Even though it is currently used by 21 Member States, e-CODEX lacks a clear, uniform and EU-wide legal basis. To remedy this situation, on 2 December 2020 the Commission put forward a proposal for an e-CODEX legal instrument (a regulation) to formally establish the e-CODEX system at EU level. The management of the project would be entrusted to eu-LISA (the EU Agency for the Operational Management of Large-Scale IT Systems in the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice). Within the European Parliament, the LIBE and JURI committees are jointly in charge of the file, and the draft report is expected shortly.

The European Education Area and the 2030 strategic framework for education and training

28-05-2021

European Union cooperation in the field of education and training has developed in a number of areas that now have well-established roots. The best-known example is possibly the Bologna Process that led to the establishment of the European higher education area. The Copenhagen Declaration lent impetus to a process of cooperation in vocational education and training. This was accompanied by two strategic framework agreements for European cooperation in education and training (ET2010 and ET2020). The ...

European Union cooperation in the field of education and training has developed in a number of areas that now have well-established roots. The best-known example is possibly the Bologna Process that led to the establishment of the European higher education area. The Copenhagen Declaration lent impetus to a process of cooperation in vocational education and training. This was accompanied by two strategic framework agreements for European cooperation in education and training (ET2010 and ET2020). The stocktaking on the expiry of the second framework for cooperation – ET 2020 – revealed some positive trends as the numbers of both young children in early childhood education and of graduates rose. However, the number of underachieving 15 year-olds remains high and the participation of adults in learning is low. The European Commission, the Council of the EU and the European Parliament seem to concur that cooperation in education and training needs to be reinforced. The Commission has set out its vision for a European education area in three communications, which show that this is still work in progress. The Council, on the other hand, has endorsed another framework for cooperation up to 2030, which is clearly aimed at supporting the implementation of such an area. The May 2021 Education Council conclusions give pointers as to how aspects of this area are to be addressed. The debate in the European Parliament is in its initial phase with the rapporteur noting that, while there is agreement on the need for a European education area and ongoing cooperation, the European institutions have yet to adopt a single approach.

Review of the Preparatory Action on Defence Research (PADR) and European Defence Industrial Development Programme (EDIDP): lessons for the implementation of the European Defence Fund (EDF)

27-05-2021

Of all European defence initiatives launched since 2016, the European Defence Fund (EDF) is without doubt one of the most promising, if not the most promising. However, the EDF will not by itself solve all problems related to the fragmentation and therefore inefficiency of European defence procurement. Only the Member States can do so, working in good faith together with the Commission in deciding the EDF work programme and funding allocations. Doing this, it will be essential not to confuse the ...

Of all European defence initiatives launched since 2016, the European Defence Fund (EDF) is without doubt one of the most promising, if not the most promising. However, the EDF will not by itself solve all problems related to the fragmentation and therefore inefficiency of European defence procurement. Only the Member States can do so, working in good faith together with the Commission in deciding the EDF work programme and funding allocations. Doing this, it will be essential not to confuse the ends – the creation of a strong and competitive European Defence and Technological Industrial Base (EDTIB) – the ways – inclusiveness through wide cross-border cooperation and the will to pursue strategic autonomy – and the means – the defence research projects funded by the EDF. Keeping the course between at times conflicting paths and ensuring the return on a meaningful but still modest investment (EUR 7.9 billion over seven years) will be the main EDF challenges in the years ahead.

Údar seachtarach

• Frédéric MAURO, Lawyer at the bar of Brussels, associate researcher at ‘Institut de Relations Internationales et Stratégiques’ (IRIS) France • Dr. Edouard SIMON, Senior Fellow at IRIS, France/Belgium • Ana Isabel XAVIER, Professor in International Relations at the Autonomous University of Lisbon (UAL) Portugal

A statute for European cross-border associations and non-profit organizations Potential benefits in the current situation

26-05-2021

After carrying out a comparative analysis of the main laws on non-profit organizations in force in some selected European countries, the Study discusses a potential legislative initiative of the European Union on the subject, presenting the different options available and concluding that the European Union should introduce a European status not limited to non-profit organizations but aimed, more generally, at including related organizations such as those of the third sector and the social economy ...

After carrying out a comparative analysis of the main laws on non-profit organizations in force in some selected European countries, the Study discusses a potential legislative initiative of the European Union on the subject, presenting the different options available and concluding that the European Union should introduce a European status not limited to non-profit organizations but aimed, more generally, at including related organizations such as those of the third sector and the social economy.

Údar seachtarach

Prof. Antonio FICI

Imeachtaí atá ar na bacáin

29-11-2021
The Mutual Defence Clause (Article 42(7) TEU) in the face of new threats
Éisteacht -
SEDE
29-11-2021
Competitiveness of EU agriculture
Éisteacht -
AGRI
30-11-2021
Eliminating Violence against Women - Inter-parliamentary committee meeting
Imeacht eile -
FEMM

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