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Research for REGI Committee -The economic, social and territorial situation in LA REUNION

15-10-2018

This briefing was prepared to provide information for the visit to La Réunion on 16th September 2018 by a delegation of the European Parliament’s Committee on Regional Development.

This briefing was prepared to provide information for the visit to La Réunion on 16th September 2018 by a delegation of the European Parliament’s Committee on Regional Development.

Research for PECH Committee - Åland Islands

15-05-2018

The Åland Islands is an autonomous, demilitarised, Swedish-speaking region of Finland. The archipelago has its own government and parliament. The Åland Islands is a small society with an open economy that is dependent on trade with its neighbouring regions, notably Southern Finland and the Stockholm region. In 2017 the Åland Islands had 6 aquaculture facilities operating. The number of employed persons in the aquaculture sector was 95 people in that same year. The number of employed persons in the ...

The Åland Islands is an autonomous, demilitarised, Swedish-speaking region of Finland. The archipelago has its own government and parliament. The Åland Islands is a small society with an open economy that is dependent on trade with its neighbouring regions, notably Southern Finland and the Stockholm region. In 2017 the Åland Islands had 6 aquaculture facilities operating. The number of employed persons in the aquaculture sector was 95 people in that same year. The number of employed persons in the fishing sector in the Åland Islands amounted to 88 persons in 2016.

Outermost regions of the EU: A stronger and renewed partnership

19-01-2018

The EU's outermost regions qualify for special treatment owing to structural difficulties, such as remoteness, difficult topography or economic dependence on a few products, which can severely hamper their development. Specific support mechanisms exist under cohesion, agricultural and fisheries policies, with the Commission outlining measures aimed at assisting outermost regions in its communications published in 2004, 2008, and 2012. Nevertheless, with the outermost regions continuing to face numerous ...

The EU's outermost regions qualify for special treatment owing to structural difficulties, such as remoteness, difficult topography or economic dependence on a few products, which can severely hamper their development. Specific support mechanisms exist under cohesion, agricultural and fisheries policies, with the Commission outlining measures aimed at assisting outermost regions in its communications published in 2004, 2008, and 2012. Nevertheless, with the outermost regions continuing to face numerous challenges in areas such as mobility, unemployment and climate change, discussions were launched on the formulation of a new strategy, which was published in October 2017. The result of extensive consultation with stakeholders, including Parliament and the outermost regions themselves, the 2017 communication puts forward a new approach to support their development by making the most of the outermost regions' assets, exploiting new opportunities for growth and job creation and giving greater recognition to their specific circumstances and needs. To achieve this, the communication outlines a series of concrete and coordinated actions to be taken at EU and national level, as well as by the outermost regions, and calls for a stronger partnership between outermost regions, their respective Member States, and the EU. While broadly welcoming the new strategy, the outermost regions and its partners have highlighted several key issues that it fails to cover. Equally, although the Commission puts forward many commitments and positive measures, the strategy is very much a work in progress, and its measures will need to be developed further and incorporated into the EU legislative framework before they can be rolled out on the ground. In this context, the future shape of the EU's legislative and financial proposals post-2020 will be of crucial importance for the successful delivery of this strategy. This is a revised and updated version of a briefing from March 2017, PE 599.365.

RESEARCH FOR REGI COMMITTEE - The economic, social and territorial situation of the Azores (Portugal)

14-04-2017

This briefing was prepared to provide information for the visit to the Azores (Portugal) of 22 to 26 May 2017 of a delegation of the European Parliament’s Committee on Regional Development, the islands visited being São Miguel and Terceira.

This briefing was prepared to provide information for the visit to the Azores (Portugal) of 22 to 26 May 2017 of a delegation of the European Parliament’s Committee on Regional Development, the islands visited being São Miguel and Terceira.

Outermost regions of the EU: Towards a renewed strategy

28-03-2017

The EU's outermost regions qualify for special treatment owing to structural difficulties, such as remoteness, difficult topography or economic dependence on a few products, which can severely hamper their development. Specific mechanisms exist under cohesion, agricultural and fisheries policies, with the Commission publishing a communication in 2012 setting out how it can work in partnership with the outermost regions and their respective countries to achieve the objectives of the Europe 2020 strategy ...

The EU's outermost regions qualify for special treatment owing to structural difficulties, such as remoteness, difficult topography or economic dependence on a few products, which can severely hamper their development. Specific mechanisms exist under cohesion, agricultural and fisheries policies, with the Commission publishing a communication in 2012 setting out how it can work in partnership with the outermost regions and their respective countries to achieve the objectives of the Europe 2020 strategy. While a renewed strategy is due to be prepared by the Commission by the end of 2017, the outermost regions continue to face numerous challenges in areas such as mobility, unemployment and climate change. Stakeholders have already begun to draft their contributions to this renewed strategy, highlighting issues such as the need to ensure that trade agreements take better account of outermost regions' needs, maintain specific provisions for these regions in areas such as cohesion, agriculture and fisheries policy, and provide the outermost regions with improved access to horizontal programmes. Parliament's Committee on Regional Development is preparing an own-initiative report on the outermost regions as part of this process. It remains to be seen, however, how receptive the Commission will be to these proposals in a context of increasing budgetary pressure. Bringing together representatives of the Commission and the outermost regions, as well as some of the key stakeholders involved, the fourth forum on outermost regions to be held on 30-31 March 2017 will provide a key platform for discussions that can shape the future development of the outermost regions for generations to come.

Islands of the EU: Taking account of their specific needs in EU policy

29-01-2016

Many EU Member States have islands and insular territories (e.g. archipelagos). Among these islands are several world famous tourist destinations, while they are home to considerable natural and cultural wealth. Certain islands also produce renowned agricultural products and handcrafts. However, islands also face considerable challenges. They may lack adequate transport links with the nearest mainland. Their ecosystems are vulnerable and natural resources are often scarce. Some are small and/or mountainous ...

Many EU Member States have islands and insular territories (e.g. archipelagos). Among these islands are several world famous tourist destinations, while they are home to considerable natural and cultural wealth. Certain islands also produce renowned agricultural products and handcrafts. However, islands also face considerable challenges. They may lack adequate transport links with the nearest mainland. Their ecosystems are vulnerable and natural resources are often scarce. Some are small and/or mountainous. Many are located on the periphery of a Member State, or constitute border regions, placing considerable limitations on their potential for economic growth. Islands are usually too small to allow economies of scale. They may lack human capital and possess limited public resources in health, education, research and innovation. More recently, the EU's southern islands have seen a large influx of migrants, whilst lacking the resources needed for their accommodation or integration. In most cases, islands are not self-sufficient in agricultural and industrial products or tertiary-sector services. They are usually reliant on imported fossil fuels and dependent on mainland energy networks. As the majority of products and services have to be transported to islands, prices are considerably higher, adding to the cost of living in insular territories. However, although the state of insularity creates a large number of problems, various studies suggest that islands can become 'lands of opportunities' by investing in their relative strengths. Article 174 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) recognises the special nature of island territories. However, very few concrete EU measures have aimed to support islands to date. Several insular regions and municipalities call for the development of an 'insular dimension' in EU policies, and for EU regional policy to take insularity factors, that affect them disproportionately, into account. They also claim that due to the European Commission's established method of regional funding –based on GDP – certain islands and insular territories are severely penalised.

Environmental sustainability of EU islands

07-06-2010

EU islands share some of the challenges of the other EU regions but also have specific handicaps that might hinder their sustainable development prospects. Even if there is no EU insular law or specific funds for islands (except for outermost regions), and the definition of island regions remaining controversial, they can still use the available EU funds to tackle sustainable development. Aside from the cohesion policy 2007-2013, island regions can finance environmental sustainability projects ...

EU islands share some of the challenges of the other EU regions but also have specific handicaps that might hinder their sustainable development prospects. Even if there is no EU insular law or specific funds for islands (except for outermost regions), and the definition of island regions remaining controversial, they can still use the available EU funds to tackle sustainable development. Aside from the cohesion policy 2007-2013, island regions can finance environmental sustainability projects through the LIFE Programme, the European Agriculture Fund for Rural Development and the European Fisheries Fund.

Fisheries in the Dodecanese islands

15-07-2008

Note on the fisheries and aquaculture sector in the Dodecanese islands for the Delegation of the Committee on Fisheries from 1/10/2008 to 3/10/2008.

Note on the fisheries and aquaculture sector in the Dodecanese islands for the Delegation of the Committee on Fisheries from 1/10/2008 to 3/10/2008.

Public Hearing on Climate Change and Small Island States

01-02-1997

Public Hearing held by the ACP-Eu Joint Assembly, Luxembourg, 25 September 1996

Public Hearing held by the ACP-Eu Joint Assembly, Luxembourg, 25 September 1996

Imeachtaí atá ar na bacáin

25-01-2021
Public Hearing on "Gender aspects of precarious work"
Éisteacht -
FEMM
26-01-2021
Public hearing on Co-management of EU fisheries at local level
Éisteacht -
PECH
26-01-2021
The impact of Brexit on the level playing field in the area of taxation
Éisteacht -
FISC

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