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Research for AGRI Committee - The EU Cattle Sector: Challenges and Opportunities - Milk and Meat

15-02-2017

The cattle sector is of great economic importance within the EU agricultural sector. Productivity of the sector is very heterogeneous. In the near future, a further increase in milk and bovine meat supply can be expected. To avoid a decline in farm gate prices, further product differentiation at the EU level, an increase in export opportunities as well as compensation for environmental services to support extensification will be needed.

The cattle sector is of great economic importance within the EU agricultural sector. Productivity of the sector is very heterogeneous. In the near future, a further increase in milk and bovine meat supply can be expected. To avoid a decline in farm gate prices, further product differentiation at the EU level, an increase in export opportunities as well as compensation for environmental services to support extensification will be needed.

Údar seachtarach

Rico Ihle, Liesbeth Dries, Roel Jongeneel, Thomas Venus and Justus Wesseler (Wageningen University, The Netherlands)

EU agricultural promotion measures

17-06-2016

In light of the challenges currently facing the agriculture sector in the EU, an effective promotion policy becomes an important instrument in helping European agriculture to compete on world markets. Given the contribution the agri-food sector makes to total EU exports, it is essential for it to improve its competitiveness and market share. To support this objective, a new promotion policy for EU agricultural products has been developed, applicable since 1 December 2015. Based on a new Regulation ...

In light of the challenges currently facing the agriculture sector in the EU, an effective promotion policy becomes an important instrument in helping European agriculture to compete on world markets. Given the contribution the agri-food sector makes to total EU exports, it is essential for it to improve its competitiveness and market share. To support this objective, a new promotion policy for EU agricultural products has been developed, applicable since 1 December 2015. Based on a new Regulation, the policy introduces significant changes to the EU's information provision and promotion measures. These include an increased annual budget of up to €200 million by 2019, a greater focus on third countries; simplification, an expansion in the scope of measures to allow labelling to specify the origin of products and their brands under certain conditions, easier management of multi-country programmes and an expansion in the scope of eligible products and eligible beneficiaries. The key elements of the new policy are presented alongside details of the main administration and delivery mechanisms including its work programme for 2016. The latter sets out the priorities accorded to promotion activities for both the internal market and for those third countries where there is the highest potential for growth. The first calls for proposals under the new rules closed at the end of April 2016. Though it is too soon to examine the outcome of the 2016 call, it is possible to provide evidence on the potential impact that might be expected from agricultural information and promotion programmes.

Organic food: Helping EU consumers make an informed choice

19-05-2015

Organic production is an overall system of farm management and food production that aims at sustainable agriculture, high-quality products and the use of processes that do not harm the environment, or human, plant or animal health and welfare. Prompted mainly by environmental concerns and in spite of the higher price of organic products, EU consumers spent over €22 billion in 2013, helping the EU organic market grow by nearly 6%. To help them make an informed choice, the European Commission introduced ...

Organic production is an overall system of farm management and food production that aims at sustainable agriculture, high-quality products and the use of processes that do not harm the environment, or human, plant or animal health and welfare. Prompted mainly by environmental concerns and in spite of the higher price of organic products, EU consumers spent over €22 billion in 2013, helping the EU organic market grow by nearly 6%. To help them make an informed choice, the European Commission introduced a specific EU organic logo in 2010, complementing earlier legislation setting up an extensive framework of rules and requirements on the production, processing, handling and certification of organic foods. While demand is mainly concentrated in North America and Europe, over three quarters of the nearly 2 million organic producers worldwide are in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The EU continues to be a forerunner in organic agriculture thanks to strong consumer demand, strict legal protection and support for organic production. Around one eighth of the world's organic producers – 260 000 – are situated in the EU, and in 2013 they cultivated over 10 million hectares of land. Within the EU organic market Germany has the largest share (€7.6 billion) followed by France (€4.4 billion), the United Kingdom (€2.1 billion), and Italy (€2 billion). While the sustainable nature of organic farming is generally conceded, its health and nutritional benefits are still widely debated. The use of (organic) pesticides and the possible presence of residues in organically grown crops also attract a lot of attention. Meanwhile, the increasing competition for shoppers and the recent market entry of retail discounters such as Aldi, make analysts fear a price war seriously affecting farmers and food manufacturers. The recent growth in organic farming has also given rise to the so-called 'conventionalisation hypothesis', according to which some big organic farms are increasingly functioning as modified models of conventional farms.

Comparative Analysis of Risk Management Tools Supported by the 2014 US Farm Bill and the CAP 2014-2020

15-12-2014

The 2014 Farm Bill includes risk management tools as an integral component of national agricultural policy whereas the CAP 2014-2020 seems to include them as an afterthought. While EU principles are sound, policies remain in limbo. They suffer from a double dichotomy: two CAP pillars and two administrative levels for implementation. Ten recommendations are proposed for transforming the current state of limbo for EU agricultural risk management policy into a coherent CAP linked to world markets. ...

The 2014 Farm Bill includes risk management tools as an integral component of national agricultural policy whereas the CAP 2014-2020 seems to include them as an afterthought. While EU principles are sound, policies remain in limbo. They suffer from a double dichotomy: two CAP pillars and two administrative levels for implementation. Ten recommendations are proposed for transforming the current state of limbo for EU agricultural risk management policy into a coherent CAP linked to world markets. They cover (1) EU coordination between public safety nets and private risk management tools, (2) flexible funding with improved reserve funds and precautionary savings, and (3) field tests to take full advantage of the creativity of private-public partnerships and to create an experience curve.

Údar seachtarach

Jean Cordier (UMR SMART-LERECO, Agrocampus Ouest INRA)

State, Prospects and Implications of EU-CEEC Agricultural Integration

01-06-1997

Limited to the countries addressed in the European Commission's White Paper on Enlargement (Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia), this synthesis of the available studies provides a comprehensive summary of the work carried out to date on the agricultural situation in the CEEC, pre-accession agricultural integration between CEEC and EU, agricultural implications of CEEC accession to the EU and the future of the CAP in an enlarged Union.

Limited to the countries addressed in the European Commission's White Paper on Enlargement (Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia), this synthesis of the available studies provides a comprehensive summary of the work carried out to date on the agricultural situation in the CEEC, pre-accession agricultural integration between CEEC and EU, agricultural implications of CEEC accession to the EU and the future of the CAP in an enlarged Union.

Údar seachtarach

Peter Walkenhorst, Food Research Institute, Stanford, USA

Imeachtaí atá ar na bacáin

19-04-2021
Public Hearing - Empowering women entrepreneurs and investors
Éisteacht -
FEMM
19-04-2021
The reform of the Code of Conduct Group criteria and process
Éisteacht -
FISC
21-04-2021
EPRS online history roundtable: How Jean Monnet changed Europe [...]
Imeacht eile -
EPRS

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