22

toradh/torthaí

Focal/focail
Saghas foilseacháin
Réimse beartas
Údar
Eochairfhocal
Dáta

Nomination of a Polish member of the European Court of Auditors

10-12-2020

On 29 October 2020, the Polish government proposed the nomination of Marek Opioła, as a candidate for membership of the European Court of Auditors (ECA). There is currently no Polish member of the ECA, since Janusz Wojciechowski took office as European Commissioner on 1 December 2019. The European Parliament's Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) held a hearing with the nominee on 7 December, and subsequently delivered an unfavourable opinion. A vote in plenary is scheduled for the December plenary ...

On 29 October 2020, the Polish government proposed the nomination of Marek Opioła, as a candidate for membership of the European Court of Auditors (ECA). There is currently no Polish member of the ECA, since Janusz Wojciechowski took office as European Commissioner on 1 December 2019. The European Parliament's Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) held a hearing with the nominee on 7 December, and subsequently delivered an unfavourable opinion. A vote in plenary is scheduled for the December plenary session.

Strengthening transparency and integrity via the new ‘Independent Ethics Body’ (IEB)

31-10-2020

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee, provides an overview of transparency and integrity-related elements in the current EU setting, covering both substantive elements (including, in particular, conflict of interest and revolving-doors) as well as the body in charge of ethical control and guidance. Based on a comparison covering France, Ireland and Canada, this study proposes an ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee, provides an overview of transparency and integrity-related elements in the current EU setting, covering both substantive elements (including, in particular, conflict of interest and revolving-doors) as well as the body in charge of ethical control and guidance. Based on a comparison covering France, Ireland and Canada, this study proposes an ‘Independent Ethics Body’ (IEB) via a new interinstitutional agreement.

Údar seachtarach

FRISCHHUT Markus

Has the application of the “fit and proper” regime improved governance structures in the Banking Union?

23-04-2020

This paper examines trends in the size and composition of the boards of significant institutions during the 2011-2018 period, comprising several years before and after the ECB started conducting fit and proper assessments in 2014. Throughout this period, there have been trends towards directors who are more qualified, hold fewer other board positions, and are more likely to be female and a foreign national. Unlike in the pre-SSM period, however, more recently the average age of directors has increased ...

This paper examines trends in the size and composition of the boards of significant institutions during the 2011-2018 period, comprising several years before and after the ECB started conducting fit and proper assessments in 2014. Throughout this period, there have been trends towards directors who are more qualified, hold fewer other board positions, and are more likely to be female and a foreign national. Unlike in the pre-SSM period, however, more recently the average age of directors has increased, bank boards have become larger, and the share of independent directors has risen. The appointment of additional independent directors in recent years is potentially harmful to financial stability, as especially independent directors could favour riskier bank strategies with a view to increasing shareholder value.

Údar seachtarach

A.Bertay, H.Huizinga

Follow up to the 2009 and 2014 Studies on the Code of Conduct for Commissioners - Improving Effectiveness and Efficiency

15-07-2019

The European Parliament is very attentive to the issue of transparency and integrity within the EU institutions. In the past, the EP has commissioned two studies to verify the level of effectiveness and efficiency of the Code of Conduct for Commissioners of the European Commission. This in-depth analysis verifies whether the Code of Conduct of 2018 complies with the requests the EP has made in order to guarantee the best performance in terms of transparency and integrity by the EC Commissioners. ...

The European Parliament is very attentive to the issue of transparency and integrity within the EU institutions. In the past, the EP has commissioned two studies to verify the level of effectiveness and efficiency of the Code of Conduct for Commissioners of the European Commission. This in-depth analysis verifies whether the Code of Conduct of 2018 complies with the requests the EP has made in order to guarantee the best performance in terms of transparency and integrity by the EC Commissioners. Most of the EP requests have been satisfied. However, there is still some room for improvement in terms of transparency of the Independent Ethical Committee, the cooling off period for Commissioners and provisions related to the role of the European Ombudsman within the Code. Moreover, the Code of Conduct, being a soft law instrument, could be upgraded to a hard law instrument having a stronger binding force. Finally, the EP could reiterate the study recommendations concerning stricter provisions on the involvement of Commissioners in the national, regional or local politics.

EU law for an open independent and efficient European administration

27-07-2018

The results of the public consultation clearly suggest - EU citizens want action. Citizens call for an action that wold turn their EU right to good administration into solution. The workable and enforceable solution that adds value. Europe needs innovation! Innovation not only in tools and technologies but also in how EU governs itself.

The results of the public consultation clearly suggest - EU citizens want action. Citizens call for an action that wold turn their EU right to good administration into solution. The workable and enforceable solution that adds value. Europe needs innovation! Innovation not only in tools and technologies but also in how EU governs itself.

Impact Assessment of possible action at EU level for an open, efficient and independent EU administration

12-07-2018

The fragmentation of EU administrative law impinges on the EU’s ability to consistently uphold standards of good governance and administration, as well as to protect citizens’ rights when they interact with the administration. The impact assessment analyses what action could be taken to guarantee an open, efficient and independent EU administration. It compares the option of “doing nothing” with two alternative policy options. The study concludes that adopting a regulatory framework for administrative ...

The fragmentation of EU administrative law impinges on the EU’s ability to consistently uphold standards of good governance and administration, as well as to protect citizens’ rights when they interact with the administration. The impact assessment analyses what action could be taken to guarantee an open, efficient and independent EU administration. It compares the option of “doing nothing” with two alternative policy options. The study concludes that adopting a regulatory framework for administrative procedures would be the preferred option, since it would lead to clear advantages in terms of cost savings for the public, as well as the accessibility, transparency, legal certainty and predictability as well as the legitimacy of, and trust in, EU institutions. It would also compliment the transition of the EU administration towards e-government and e-administration tools.

Údar seachtarach

EPRS, DG

Revolving doors in the EU and US

04-07-2018

The flow of officials and politicians between the public and private sector has in the past few years given rise to calls for more transparency and accountability. In order to mitigate the reputational damage to public institutions by problematic use of the 'revolving door', this phenomenon is increasingly being regulated at national level. In the United States, President Trump recently changed the rules put in place by his predecessor to slow the revolving door. As shown by press coverage, the US ...

The flow of officials and politicians between the public and private sector has in the past few years given rise to calls for more transparency and accountability. In order to mitigate the reputational damage to public institutions by problematic use of the 'revolving door', this phenomenon is increasingly being regulated at national level. In the United States, President Trump recently changed the rules put in place by his predecessor to slow the revolving door. As shown by press coverage, the US public remains unconvinced. Scepticism may be fuelled by new exceptions made to the rules – retroactive ethics pledge waivers – and the refusal of the White House to disclose the numbers or beneficiaries of said waivers. Watchdog organisations argue that not only has the Trump administration so far failed to 'drain the swamp', it has ended up doing quite the opposite. In the EU, where revolving door cases are increasingly being covered in the media, both the European Parliament and Commission have adopted Codes of Conduct, regulating the activities of current and former Members, Commissioners, and even staff. The European Ombudsman, Emily O'Reilly, has on numerous occasions spoken out in favour of further measures, such as 'cooling-off periods', and has carried out several inquiries into potentially problematic revolving door cases. Following calls from Parliament, the Juncker Commission adopted a new and stronger Code of Conduct for Commissioners early in 2018. Even so, no one single Code can hope to bring an end to the debate.

Codes of Conduct and Conflicts of Interest at any governance level of the management of EU Funds

16-01-2017

This study reviews the Member States’ experience with codes of conduct and conflicts of interest affecting the partnership arrangements under the European Structural and Investment Funds. The focus is on conflicts of interest affecting the Monitoring Committees under the European Regional Development and European Social Fund. The study reviews the rules and other approaches to deal with conflicts of interest, discusses best practices and ends with conclusions and recommendations advocating a complementary ...

This study reviews the Member States’ experience with codes of conduct and conflicts of interest affecting the partnership arrangements under the European Structural and Investment Funds. The focus is on conflicts of interest affecting the Monitoring Committees under the European Regional Development and European Social Fund. The study reviews the rules and other approaches to deal with conflicts of interest, discusses best practices and ends with conclusions and recommendations advocating a complementary rule and value based approach supported by transparency and ethical leadership.

Údar seachtarach

Dr. Christoph Demmke (assisted by David Hanel), Roland Blomeyer, Dr. Thomas Henökel, Mike Beke, Timo Moilanen

Integrity and Good Governance in Sport

21-12-2015

The author describes his progress from sports enthusiast to sceptic following repeated experiences, as a journalist, of frauds in high-level sports including athletics and swimming but especially cycling. These frauds involved performance-enhancing drugs and medical procedures and Walsh took the lead in exposing Lance Armstrong as a key beneficiary. The importance of asking the ‘obvious question’ to get to the truth is emphasised. Walsh stresses the role played by elected representatives and governments ...

The author describes his progress from sports enthusiast to sceptic following repeated experiences, as a journalist, of frauds in high-level sports including athletics and swimming but especially cycling. These frauds involved performance-enhancing drugs and medical procedures and Walsh took the lead in exposing Lance Armstrong as a key beneficiary. The importance of asking the ‘obvious question’ to get to the truth is emphasised. Walsh stresses the role played by elected representatives and governments in a world where the governing bodies of sports have often proven inadequate to the task of maintaining fair play and good governance. In the case of cycling, and FIFA in football, it was government that initiated definitive action against fraud. Walsh argues that the nominees of governments to the presidency of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) are the most effective. Walsh hopes, but is not optimistic, that a WADA investigation of doping will lead to the suspension from Olympic competition of any guilty national athletics federations, not just individual athletes. He further argues that doping in sport is a very high value fraud that governments should make a criminal offence. Finally, Walsh explains that he remains an enthusiast for sport – his scepticism is reserved for elite sports and the focus on hosting high profile events and increasing national medal tallies. He feels that this elite focus does not lead to any improvement in sport participation – even the contrary – and that getting people active should be the political priority, especially young people and those in sociallydeprived areas where participation is lowest.

Údar seachtarach

David Walsh

Scrutiny of Declarations of Financial Interests in National Legislatures

15-09-2015

This study aims to provide insights into the implementation and enforcement of integrity regimes as applied to members of legislatures. The specific focus is on comparing the application of the Code of Conduct of Members of the European Parliament with similar integrity frameworks in the European Union Member States. In general terms the Code of Conduct is considered well aligned with good practice approaches. However, potential for further enhancements exists with regard to the Code’s integrity ...

This study aims to provide insights into the implementation and enforcement of integrity regimes as applied to members of legislatures. The specific focus is on comparing the application of the Code of Conduct of Members of the European Parliament with similar integrity frameworks in the European Union Member States. In general terms the Code of Conduct is considered well aligned with good practice approaches. However, potential for further enhancements exists with regard to the Code’s integrity requirements, guidance, monitoring, sanctioning and reporting.

Údar seachtarach

Blomeyer & Sanz (Spain)

Imeachtaí atá ar na bacáin

07-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: What is the future of (European) sovereignty?
Imeacht eile -
EPRS
08-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Statistics, Data and Trust: Why figures matter [...]
Imeacht eile -
EPRS
21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Matters of Record: Inside European Politics
Imeacht eile -
EPRS

Pairtnéirí