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The new European cybersecurity competence centre and network

24-07-2020

On 13 September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package containing a series of initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. A year later, the Commission presented a proposal for the creation of a European cybersecurity competence centre with a related network of national coordination centres. The initiative aims to improve and strengthen the EU's cybersecurity capacity, by stimulating the European technological and industrial cybersecurity ecosystem as ...

On 13 September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package containing a series of initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. A year later, the Commission presented a proposal for the creation of a European cybersecurity competence centre with a related network of national coordination centres. The initiative aims to improve and strengthen the EU's cybersecurity capacity, by stimulating the European technological and industrial cybersecurity ecosystem as well as coordinating and pooling necessary resources in Europe. The competence centre is supposed to become the main body that would manage EU financial resources dedicated to cybersecurity research under the two proposed programmes – Digital Europe and Horizon Europe – within the next multiannual financial framework, for 2021-2027. Within the European Parliament, the file was assigned to the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). The report was adopted on 19 February 2019 in the ITRE committee and voted by Parliament during the March I 2019 plenary. Although trilogue negotiations took place in March 2019, given the short timeframe until the end of the legislative term no agreement could be reached, and Parliament then adopted its first-reading position ahead of the May 2019 elections. A third trilogue meeting took place more than a year later, on 25 June 2020, and further negotiations are planned for September 2020. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Cyber: How big is the threat?

09-07-2019

The internet has transformed the world into a global village transcending physical borders and palpable distances. Often described as 'fog' or a 'globalised network of networks', cyberspace is extremely complex, accessible to everyone and difficult to pinpoint. While thanks to these characteristics cyberspace has opened countless social, economic and political opportunities, it has also become a source of disruption, conflict and geopolitical rivalries. The European Union has recognised that cyber-security ...

The internet has transformed the world into a global village transcending physical borders and palpable distances. Often described as 'fog' or a 'globalised network of networks', cyberspace is extremely complex, accessible to everyone and difficult to pinpoint. While thanks to these characteristics cyberspace has opened countless social, economic and political opportunities, it has also become a source of disruption, conflict and geopolitical rivalries. The European Union has recognised that cyber-security and cyber-defence are critical for both its prosperity and security, and is emerging as an increasingly capable cyber player.

ENISA and a new cybersecurity act

05-07-2019

In September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package with new initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. As part of these, the Commission tabled a legislative proposal to strengthen the EU Agency for Network Information Security (ENISA). Following the adoption of the Network Information Security Directive in 2016, ENISA is expected to play a broader role in the EU's cybersecurity landscape but is constrained by its current mandate and resources. The Commission ...

In September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package with new initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. As part of these, the Commission tabled a legislative proposal to strengthen the EU Agency for Network Information Security (ENISA). Following the adoption of the Network Information Security Directive in 2016, ENISA is expected to play a broader role in the EU's cybersecurity landscape but is constrained by its current mandate and resources. The Commission presented an ambitious reform proposal, including a permanent mandate for the agency, to ensure that ENISA can not only provide expert advice, as has been the case until now, but can also perform operational tasks. The proposal also envisaged the creation of the first voluntary EU cybersecurity certification framework for ICT products, where ENISA will also play an important role. Within the European Parliament, the Industry, Research and Energy Committee adopted its report on 10 July 2018. An agreement was reached with the Council during the fifth trilogue meeting, on 10 December 2018. The text was adopted by the European Parliament on 12 March and by the Council on 9 April 2019. The new regulation came into force on 27 June 2019. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

ENISA and new EU Cybersecurity Act

06-03-2019

The European Commission proposed to increase EU resilience and response to cyber-attacks via a permanent mandate and an enhanced role for the EU Agency for Network Information Security (ENISA), the EU cybersecurity agency. It also envisages creating the first EU cybersecurity certification framework for ICT products and services, where ENISA will play an important role. The European Parliament's Industry, Research and Energy Committee (ITRE) adopted its report on 10 July 2018, as well as a mandate ...

The European Commission proposed to increase EU resilience and response to cyber-attacks via a permanent mandate and an enhanced role for the EU Agency for Network Information Security (ENISA), the EU cybersecurity agency. It also envisages creating the first EU cybersecurity certification framework for ICT products and services, where ENISA will play an important role. The European Parliament's Industry, Research and Energy Committee (ITRE) adopted its report on 10 July 2018, as well as a mandate to enter into interinstitutional negotiations. The Council adopted its mandate on 8 June 2018. During the fifth trilogue meeting on 10 December 2018 an agreement was reached. It is due to be voted by Parliament in plenary during March.

Establishing a cybersecurity competence centre and a network of national coordination centres

19-02-2019

The Commission describes logically the significance of cyberdefence and the potential for improvement in this field for the EU. However, the impact assessment accompanying the proposal does not appear to have fully followed the requirements of the better regulation guidelines particularly as no open public consultation was conducted. The impact assessment presents a limited range of options as a result of a number of parameters that were pre-set from the outset and which could have constrained the ...

The Commission describes logically the significance of cyberdefence and the potential for improvement in this field for the EU. However, the impact assessment accompanying the proposal does not appear to have fully followed the requirements of the better regulation guidelines particularly as no open public consultation was conducted. The impact assessment presents a limited range of options as a result of a number of parameters that were pre-set from the outset and which could have constrained the scope of the impact assessment.

Implementation and functioning of the '.eu' top level domain name

12-10-2018

The scope of the problem could have been defined in more precise terms. Furthermore, it remains unclear how the proposed options could help achieve one of the two general objectives of the initiative namely enabling or building an online European identity as the options (including the preferred one) are mostly concerned with the technical improvements of the regulatory framework. Stakeholder views do not appear to be fully reflected in the report and it is unclear how they fed into the IA. A more ...

The scope of the problem could have been defined in more precise terms. Furthermore, it remains unclear how the proposed options could help achieve one of the two general objectives of the initiative namely enabling or building an online European identity as the options (including the preferred one) are mostly concerned with the technical improvements of the regulatory framework. Stakeholder views do not appear to be fully reflected in the report and it is unclear how they fed into the IA. A more thorough integration of the recommendations of the Regulatory Scrutiny Board, which appear to be only partially addressed, would have benefited the quality if the IA.

EU Cybersecurity Agency and cybersecurity certification

20-12-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, which is the main part of the 'Cybersecurity package', submitted on 13 September 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). As announced in the State of the Union Address 2017 and the Commission's communication on Europe's Cyber Resilience System and Cybersecurity Industry, the initiative aims ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, which is the main part of the 'Cybersecurity package', submitted on 13 September 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). As announced in the State of the Union Address 2017 and the Commission's communication on Europe's Cyber Resilience System and Cybersecurity Industry, the initiative aims to reform the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA or 'Agency') in order to enhance its supporting functions for Member States in achieving cybersecurity resilience and to acknowledge the Agency's responsibilities under the new directive on security of network and information systems (NIS Directive). In addition, the proposal establishes a voluntary European cybersecurity certification framework to promote such certification schemes for specific information and communication technology (ICT) products and services, and to allow for mutual recognition of certificates so as to avoid further market fragmentation.

EYE 2016 – Cyber-attacks: Visible danger, invisible enemy

28-04-2016

The advance of information and communication technologies (ICT) has created numerous opportunities for human development, and reshaped the ways in which our societies communicate, work or learn. However, our reliance on internet-based platforms can also be a source of vulnerability, exploited by criminal networks for financial or political aims. XXXXXXXX Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

The advance of information and communication technologies (ICT) has created numerous opportunities for human development, and reshaped the ways in which our societies communicate, work or learn. However, our reliance on internet-based platforms can also be a source of vulnerability, exploited by criminal networks for financial or political aims. XXXXXXXX Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Cybersecurity in the European Union and Beyond: Exploring the Threats and Policy Responses

28-10-2015

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee. It sets out to develop a better understanding of the main cybersecurity threats and existing cybersecurity capabilities in the European Union and the United States. The study further examines transnational cooperation and explores perceptions of the effectiveness of the EU response, pinpointing remaining challenges and suggesting avenues ...

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee. It sets out to develop a better understanding of the main cybersecurity threats and existing cybersecurity capabilities in the European Union and the United States. The study further examines transnational cooperation and explores perceptions of the effectiveness of the EU response, pinpointing remaining challenges and suggesting avenues for improvement.

Údar seachtarach

Nicole van der Meulen, Eun A. Jo and Stefan Soesanto (RAND Europe)

The Law Enforcement Challenges of Cybercrime: Are We Really Playing Catch-Up?

28-10-2015

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee. With a number of high-profile criminal cases, such as ‘Silk Road’, cybercrime has been very much in the spotlight in recent years, both in Europe and elsewhere. While this study shows that cybercrime poses significant challenges for law enforcement, it also argues that the key cybercrime concern for law enforcement is legal rather than technical ...

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee. With a number of high-profile criminal cases, such as ‘Silk Road’, cybercrime has been very much in the spotlight in recent years, both in Europe and elsewhere. While this study shows that cybercrime poses significant challenges for law enforcement, it also argues that the key cybercrime concern for law enforcement is legal rather than technical and technological. The study further underlines that the European Parliament is largely excluded from policy development in the field of cybercrime, impeding public scrutiny and accountability.

Údar seachtarach

Ben Hayes (Transnational Institute - TNI) ; Julien Jeandesboz (University of Amsterdam - UvA) and Centre d’Études sur les Conflits, Liberté et Sécurité - CCLS) ; Francesco Ragazzi (Leiden University, Netherlands and Centre d’Études sur les Conflits, Liberté et Sécurité - CCLS) ; Stephanie Simon (University of Amsterdam - UvA) ; Valsamis Mitsilegas (Queen Mary University of London, the UK) ; This study was coordinated by the Centre d’Études sur les Conflits, Liberté et Sécurité (CCLS) and the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS) and conducted under the scientific supervision of Didier Bigo (CCLS and Sciences Po Paris and King’s College London) and Amandine Scherrer (European Studies Coordinator and Associate Researcher at CCLS)

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01-03-2021
Decarbonising European industry: hydrogen and other solutions (online event)
Ceardlann -
STOA
01-03-2021
Hearing on Transport of live animals in third countries
Éisteacht -
ANIT
01-03-2021
Exchange of views with HR/VP Josep Borrell
Éisteacht -
INGE

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