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Women in arts and culture − Artists, not muses

05-03-2021

As in all other domains, women's place in arts and culture has not matched their ambitions and skills. Traditionally they were muses of male artists or amateur performing artists, and arts education for them was very limited. Despite good progress, there is still a lot to do to ensure women fully and freely contribute their artistic vision, hold positions of responsibility, and to recover the works of courageous women artists from the dusty archives of museums.

As in all other domains, women's place in arts and culture has not matched their ambitions and skills. Traditionally they were muses of male artists or amateur performing artists, and arts education for them was very limited. Despite good progress, there is still a lot to do to ensure women fully and freely contribute their artistic vision, hold positions of responsibility, and to recover the works of courageous women artists from the dusty archives of museums.

Women in foreign affairs and international security: Still far from gender equality

03-03-2021

The debate on the participation and role of women in foreign affairs and international security is a timely and relevant one, and is being raised with increasing frequency at both national and international levels. In particular, there is growing attention to the imbalances in the representation of women in leadership and other key positions in the area of foreign and security policy, as well as to the growing body of evidence regarding the positive effect of including women in several key areas ...

The debate on the participation and role of women in foreign affairs and international security is a timely and relevant one, and is being raised with increasing frequency at both national and international levels. In particular, there is growing attention to the imbalances in the representation of women in leadership and other key positions in the area of foreign and security policy, as well as to the growing body of evidence regarding the positive effect of including women in several key areas of foreign and security policy. While gaps persist, women's representation at management and ministerial levels in the areas of foreign affairs and security has increased whether in the European Union (EU), the United States (US) or at the United Nations (UN) level. Among these issues, women's role in peacekeeping receives particular attention, as research has consistently shown that gender equality contributes to peace, and that peace negotiations involving women have a better chance of being sustainable and effective. Gender-equal societies enjoy better health, stronger economic growth and higher security. The UN and the EU have put pronounced emphasis on the issue in the past two decades. UN Security Council Resolution 1325 established the 'women, peace and security' (WPS) agenda in 2000. Since then, more WPS-related resolutions have been adopted, widening the scope and breadth of gendered peace and security. These resolutions have been instrumental in changing the philosophy and rhetoric focused on conflict and gender equality, thereby challenging the international community to do more. Several initiatives are also being implemented at EU level, including through the 2018 EU strategic approach to WPS. However, critics underline that a lot remains to be done, as women continue to be under-represented in the field of foreign and security policy across the world. This is an update of an EPRS briefing published in September 2019.

The coronavirus crisis: An emerging gender divide?

02-03-2021

The European Union remains severely hit by the coronavirus crisis, whose impact extends far beyond public health. The economic, social and psychological consequences of the pandemic are at the forefront of Member States’ and EU institutions’ concerns. Employment and working conditions have undergone major upheavals, raising the issue of a possible reversal of progress on gender equality. This infographic aims to shed light on the socioeconomic and psychological impacts of the pandemic on women, through ...

The European Union remains severely hit by the coronavirus crisis, whose impact extends far beyond public health. The economic, social and psychological consequences of the pandemic are at the forefront of Member States’ and EU institutions’ concerns. Employment and working conditions have undergone major upheavals, raising the issue of a possible reversal of progress on gender equality. This infographic aims to shed light on the socioeconomic and psychological impacts of the pandemic on women, through the lens of the transformation of the labour market, work-life balance and well-being. It is based on Eurostat data and a study conducted by Eurofound on living and working in the times of Covid-19.

Women's rights and well-being in a post-Covid world: Internet of things (IoT) and related abuses, new ways of working, teleworking, tele-learning, unpaid care and housework, women in leadership and decision-making process

02-03-2021

On the International Women’s Day, let us recall the context in which the current event is taking place. Just about a year ago, the World Health Organisation proclaimed the COVID 19 as the global pandemics. In the scope of several weeks, it has affected all the countries in the world and persists until this day, in spite of the existence of vaccines. Hence, further societal developments are uncertain and more changes within it are to be expected. In the sections below, the Policy Department tries ...

On the International Women’s Day, let us recall the context in which the current event is taking place. Just about a year ago, the World Health Organisation proclaimed the COVID 19 as the global pandemics. In the scope of several weeks, it has affected all the countries in the world and persists until this day, in spite of the existence of vaccines. Hence, further societal developments are uncertain and more changes within it are to be expected. In the sections below, the Policy Department tries to address the selected sectors of society affecting women and girls by changes resulting from the effects of the COVID 19 pandemics.

The Gender Gap in the EU’s Public Employment and Leadership

02-03-2021

This Study has been commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee. It provides a situational analysis of the gender gap in EU and Member States public sector, administration and sphere and identifies promising policy measures for reducing it.

This Study has been commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee. It provides a situational analysis of the gender gap in EU and Member States public sector, administration and sphere and identifies promising policy measures for reducing it.

Údar seachtarach

Clara COTRONEO, Olivia BROWN, Iwona KARWOT - European Institute of Public Administration

Women in politics in the EU: State of play

26-02-2021

One hundred years after women won the vote or were first elected to parliament in some EU countries, the data show that women continue to be under-represented in politics and public life, in the European Parliament, national parliaments and governments, and local assemblies. The arguments for gender balance in politics are numerous, and benefit not only women and female politicians, but also parties themselves and the rest of society. After all, women form half the population and need to be better ...

One hundred years after women won the vote or were first elected to parliament in some EU countries, the data show that women continue to be under-represented in politics and public life, in the European Parliament, national parliaments and governments, and local assemblies. The arguments for gender balance in politics are numerous, and benefit not only women and female politicians, but also parties themselves and the rest of society. After all, women form half the population and need to be better represented in power structures. However, there is now solid evidence both of obstacles and of the strategies that are effective when it comes to increasing women's participation and representation. Here, political parties and the media can be both barriers and important enablers. The EU has committed to achieving a gender balance in political representation and participation as a matter of justice, equality and democracy. Concrete recommendations have been made for achieving this goal, including specific action that could be taken by the EU institutions, national governments, political parties, civil society and the media. The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has shone a spotlight on the issue of women's leadership and its implications for gender equality. This is an update of a Briefing from March 2019, drafted by Rosamund Shreeves and Martina Prpic, PE 635.548.

Covid-19: The need for a gendered response

26-02-2021

In the midst of the current pandemic, adopting a gender perspective may seem a secondary concern. However, pandemics are known to affect women and men differently, making it essential to recognise these differences in order to understand the impacts on individuals and communities and to respond effectively and equitably. There is already clear evidence that the ongoing health, social and economic crisis is having gendered impacts. Disaggregated data show that sex and gender are playing a role in ...

In the midst of the current pandemic, adopting a gender perspective may seem a secondary concern. However, pandemics are known to affect women and men differently, making it essential to recognise these differences in order to understand the impacts on individuals and communities and to respond effectively and equitably. There is already clear evidence that the ongoing health, social and economic crisis is having gendered impacts. Disaggregated data show that sex and gender are playing a role in exposure to the virus and risks of severe outcomes, and that some groups of women and men are particularly vulnerable. Lockdown measures have led to an increase in violence against women and disrupted access to support services. Access to sexual and reproductive healthcare has also been affected. Successive lockdowns have widened the existing gender divide in unpaid care work that was already keeping more women than men out of the labour market. Greater work-life conflict is one of the factors leading to women's employment being worse hit than men's, with potential long-term impacts on women's employment, pay and career advancement. The pandemic has also brought the issue of women's participation in decision-making to the fore. Without a gender-sensitive approach, the pandemic could have far-reaching implications, including a real risk of exacerbating gender inequalities and sending progress into reverse. At the same time, gender mainstreaming tools such as gender impact assessments and gender budgeting exist that could, if used effectively, mitigate the negative consequences and contribute to achieving gender equality. Internationally and within the European Union (EU), there have been calls for gender-sensitive emergency and long-term responses. In January 2021, the European Parliament adopted a resolution setting out recommendations on both aspects.

Zero tolerance for female genital mutilation

04-02-2021

The European Union (EU) is committed to working collectively to eradicate female genital mutilation (FGM), as part of broader efforts to combat all forms of violence against women and girls, and to supporting the efforts of its Member States in this field. The European Commission has undertaken to assess EU efforts to combat FGM every year, on or around 6 February – the International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation. This publication is a further update of an 'at a glance' note ...

The European Union (EU) is committed to working collectively to eradicate female genital mutilation (FGM), as part of broader efforts to combat all forms of violence against women and girls, and to supporting the efforts of its Member States in this field. The European Commission has undertaken to assess EU efforts to combat FGM every year, on or around 6 February – the International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation. This publication is a further update of an 'at a glance' note originally published in January 2015.

Women's rights: 25-year review of the Beijing Platform for Action

04-02-2021

Last year marked the 25th anniversary of the fourth United Nations World Conference on Women in Beijing, regarded as a turning point for the global agenda on gender equality. The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BPfA) adopted at the conference is considered the international 'Bill of Rights' for women, defining women's rights as human rights and setting goals across a range of issues affecting women and girls. Under the BPfA, the EU and its Member States committed to achieving concrete ...

Last year marked the 25th anniversary of the fourth United Nations World Conference on Women in Beijing, regarded as a turning point for the global agenda on gender equality. The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BPfA) adopted at the conference is considered the international 'Bill of Rights' for women, defining women's rights as human rights and setting goals across a range of issues affecting women and girls. Under the BPfA, the EU and its Member States committed to achieving concrete targets in twelve critical areas. The 25-year review was disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic, which is now also having substantive impacts on gender equality per se. The European Commission and Council are expected to report on Europe’s progress on the BPfA and future challenges, during the European Parliament’s plenary session in February 2021.

Implementing the Anti-trafficking Directive

04-02-2021

Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims is the main EU legislative tool addressing this phenomenon. It had to be transposed into national law by 2013. However, certain obstacles to full implementation remain almost ten years after its adoption. At the February plenary session, the European Parliament is due to debate an own-initiative report assessing the directive's effectiveness.

Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims is the main EU legislative tool addressing this phenomenon. It had to be transposed into national law by 2013. However, certain obstacles to full implementation remain almost ten years after its adoption. At the February plenary session, the European Parliament is due to debate an own-initiative report assessing the directive's effectiveness.

Imeachtaí atá ar na bacáin

15-03-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with Vivien Schmidt: Legitimacy and power in the EU
Imeacht eile -
EPRS
16-03-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: New European Bauhaus
Imeacht eile -
EPRS
17-03-2021
Hearing on Responsibilities of transport operators and other private stakeholders
Éisteacht -
ANIT

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