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The amount of clothes bought in the EU per person has increased by 40 % in just a few decades, driven by a fall in prices and the increased speed with which fashion is delivered to consumers. Clothing accounts for between 2 % and 10 % of the environmental impact of EU consumption. This impact is often felt in third countries, as most production takes place abroad. The production of raw materials, spinning them into fibres, weaving fabrics and dyeing require enormous amounts of water and chemicals ...

Global value chains, and the related trade in intermediate goods and services, dominate today's interconnected economy. Tragic events, such as the collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in 2013, have shed new light on the operation of these chains. Pressure is mounting on the various stakeholders involved at both national and international levels to prevent and mitigate the risks of the adverse effects linked to their functioning. Although a number of promising initiatives have been launched ...

The study TTIP: Opportunities and Challenges in the Area of Textiles and Labelling looks at the textiles and clothing sector. Relatively high tariffs remain in textiles and clothing and the study considers the opportunities and challenges of reducing these as well as simplifying the complex rules of origin that have been used in the sector. It also analyses the important non-tariff barriers in the sector, such as those concerning labelling and consumer safety. This is a short overview of this ...

The paper, produced by Policy Department A for the IMCO committee, analyses opportunities and challenges of TTIP for the EU in textile and clothing (T&C). This area differs from other industrial sectors in that average tariff levels are relatively high and a number of tariff peaks still exist. It would not be difficult to negotiate the complete phase out of all tariff barriers and obtain gains for consumers and firms. A more challenging task will be to tackle the existing high level of non-tariff ...

Compilation of 8 at-a-glance notes on 'TTIP: Opportunities and challenges', prepared by the Policy Department A for the Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection cover 8 sectors: - services, - public procurement, - technical barriers to trade, including standards, - customs and trade facilitation, - consumer protection, - textiles and labelling, - motor vehicles and engineering, including machinery. The analyses done on the opportunities and challenges Europe faces with regard ...

Bangladesh: human rights situation

Kratki prikaz 06-03-2015

The human rights situation in Bangladesh has been continually worsening, and what makes it even more alarming is that the state is largely responsible for this. In its September 2014 session, the European Parliament adopted a very detailed resolution expressing its deep concern over human rights violations and working conditions in the country.

This is the first in a new series of 'Implementation Appraisals', produced by the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), on the operation of existing EU legislation in practice. Each such briefing focuses on a specific EU law which is, or will shortly be, subject to an amending proposal from the European Commission, intended to update the current text. The series is based on the Commission’s intentions, as announced in its annual Work Programme (CWP). 'Implementation Appraisals' aim to provide ...

More than 70% of EU imports of textile and clothing come from Asia. Many Asian workers have to work in sweatshop conditions, but the issue appears in global media only when major fatal accidents occur, like that at Rana Plaza in Bangladesh, in 2013. Long working hours, low wages, lack of regular contracts, and systemically hazardous conditions are often reported. Trade unions, when allowed, are unable to protect workers.

Recent safety-related accidents in garment factories in Bangladesh have once again turned public attention to the sustainability of the global cotton value chain. Sensitive issues relate to the usage of forced labour and child labour in some countries, disrespect for human and labour rights in the cotton production throughout the entire value chain and its impact on the environment caused by the widespread use of pesticides and its huge need of freshwater resources.

With the end of the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing and the removal of all textiles and clothing quotas on 1 January 2005, the characteristics of global textile production patterns and trade flows will be substantially redesigned. This paper aims at evaluating the qualitative and quantitative impact of the removal of quotas by assessing the prospects for textile- and clothing-producing countries, as well as producers and consumers in the EU. The paper also takes account of linkages with other ...