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Colonial-era cultural heritage in European museums

31-08-2021

While Europeans access and enjoy their rich cultural heritage, making the most of the European Heritage Days every September, it is worth reflecting on what access people living in territories once dominated by Europe's colonial powers have to their cultural heritage. Colonial times saw the destruction of cultural property and removal of precious and symbolic items. Countries now going through the long decolonisation process have reached a point where they are exploring ways to recover their cultural ...

While Europeans access and enjoy their rich cultural heritage, making the most of the European Heritage Days every September, it is worth reflecting on what access people living in territories once dominated by Europe's colonial powers have to their cultural heritage. Colonial times saw the destruction of cultural property and removal of precious and symbolic items. Countries now going through the long decolonisation process have reached a point where they are exploring ways to recover their cultural property and heritage.

Creative Europe programme 2021-2027

17-06-2021

Having considered the possibility of merging the Creative Europe programme with other programmes supporting European values, rights and justice, the European Commission has decided to continue the Creative Europe programme as a stand-alone programme, increasing its budget by 17 %. The only programme focusing exclusively on cultural and creative activities and enterprises, it falls under the 'Cohesion and values' heading of the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework. The previous programme focused ...

Having considered the possibility of merging the Creative Europe programme with other programmes supporting European values, rights and justice, the European Commission has decided to continue the Creative Europe programme as a stand-alone programme, increasing its budget by 17 %. The only programme focusing exclusively on cultural and creative activities and enterprises, it falls under the 'Cohesion and values' heading of the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework. The previous programme focused on the economic dimension of the cultural sector and its contribution to job creation and economic growth. Some stakeholders had voiced concern at taking such a strongly economic approach to culture. Under the new programme, the economic dimension is one axis alongside the social dimension, as well as culture's contribution to international relations. The new framework for cultural policy therefore highlights not only the economic dimension of the cultural and creative sectors, but also the role of culture in social cohesion and its relation to creative and artistic freedom and diversity, and freedom and plurality of media. The Parliament, Council and Commission started trilogue negotiations in autumn 2019. After an almost year-long break, the negotiations resumed in the second half of 2020 when the Council, the Commission and the EP reached a common agreement. The new programme was then finally adopted in May 2021, but applies with retroactive effect from 1 January 2021.

Creative Europe programme 2021-2027

12-05-2021

Creative Europe 2021-2027 is the continuation of the Creative Europe programme, the only European Union programme directly targeting cultural and audiovisual activities. The EU competence in this domain is to help Member States address common challenges in these sectors, respect cultural and linguistic diversity, and safeguard cultural heritage across the EU. Its funding of only 0.14 % of the EU budget limits its scope, mainly to supporting networks, platforms, cooperation or innovation projects, ...

Creative Europe 2021-2027 is the continuation of the Creative Europe programme, the only European Union programme directly targeting cultural and audiovisual activities. The EU competence in this domain is to help Member States address common challenges in these sectors, respect cultural and linguistic diversity, and safeguard cultural heritage across the EU. Its funding of only 0.14 % of the EU budget limits its scope, mainly to supporting networks, platforms, cooperation or innovation projects, and the development of common data and studies. The European Parliament is expected to vote at second reading during its May plenary session on the agreed text resulting from interinstitutional negotiations.

Digital cultural diversity

22-04-2021

Digital technologies have revolutionised every aspect of our lives, and culture is no exception. They have impacted on the value chains of all the cultural and creative industries not only as regards the creative process and its execution but also as regards the making of a work or product of art and its promotion, distribution, marketing and sale. Cultural heritage can be digitised and, in the case of analogue film, it needs to be digitised to be made accessible. Some production processes are solely ...

Digital technologies have revolutionised every aspect of our lives, and culture is no exception. They have impacted on the value chains of all the cultural and creative industries not only as regards the creative process and its execution but also as regards the making of a work or product of art and its promotion, distribution, marketing and sale. Cultural heritage can be digitised and, in the case of analogue film, it needs to be digitised to be made accessible. Some production processes are solely digital and are born digital. Technology has a huge potential to make culture accessible to all, by democratising both consumption and involvement in cultural creation. However, technology depends on equipment and infrastructure, which does not necessarily facilitate the diversity of content available and discoverable online. Other factors, such as language, skills or geographical location can also make it harder to discover online cultural content reflecting cultural diversity. Conscious of such barriers, UNESCO has issued guidelines on the implementation of the Convention on Cultural Diversity in Digital Environments. The EU is part of this convention and has tools and funds to promote and protect cultural diversity, in line with its obligation stemming from the Treaties, not just on its own territory.

Women in arts and culture − Artists, not muses

05-03-2021

As in all other domains, women's place in arts and culture has not matched their ambitions and skills. Traditionally they were muses of male artists or amateur performing artists, and arts education for them was very limited. Despite good progress, there is still a lot to do to ensure women fully and freely contribute their artistic vision, hold positions of responsibility, and to recover the works of courageous women artists from the dusty archives of museums.

As in all other domains, women's place in arts and culture has not matched their ambitions and skills. Traditionally they were muses of male artists or amateur performing artists, and arts education for them was very limited. Despite good progress, there is still a lot to do to ensure women fully and freely contribute their artistic vision, hold positions of responsibility, and to recover the works of courageous women artists from the dusty archives of museums.

EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture / Mies van der Rohe Award: A tribute to Bauhaus

18-02-2021

The EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture (also known as the EU Mies Award) was launched in recognition of the importance and quality of European architecture. Named after German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, a figure emblematic of the Bauhaus movement, it aims to promote functionality, simplicity, sustainability and social vision in urban construction.

The EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture (also known as the EU Mies Award) was launched in recognition of the importance and quality of European architecture. Named after German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, a figure emblematic of the Bauhaus movement, it aims to promote functionality, simplicity, sustainability and social vision in urban construction.

Holocaust education: 'Never, never be a bystander'

26-01-2021

This year, 27 January, International Holocaust Remembrance Day, marks the 76th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp. One focus of this annual day of commemoration is the responsibility borne by those who remain indifferent in the face of intolerance and discrimination. This places the Holocaust in the context of human rights, broadening Holocaust education to issues of tolerance, respect for human dignity, and democracy. Holocaust education, ...

This year, 27 January, International Holocaust Remembrance Day, marks the 76th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp. One focus of this annual day of commemoration is the responsibility borne by those who remain indifferent in the face of intolerance and discrimination. This places the Holocaust in the context of human rights, broadening Holocaust education to issues of tolerance, respect for human dignity, and democracy. Holocaust education, which traditionally centres on the human and historical dimension, is also a vehicle for reflection on ethical and legal issues, and promotes critical thinking and open-mindedness. In contrast with ethical aspects and critical thinking, the legal dimension adds a new perspective to school education that can put additional pressure on the teachers responsible for Holocaust education, extending beyond their usual subject areas. Moreover, many European countries host immigrant populations whose collective history does not include this particular experience. Pupils and students meanwhile use social media, a potential source of conspiracy theories, Holocaust denial, antisemitism and xenophobia. In this context, teachers need to be ready to deal with this subject in a difficult social environment. They also need adequate resources and tools to address inconvenient truths of the period. International institutions, and the European Union and its bodies, encourage dialogue and research on these issues, recognising the importance of Holocaust education and its human rights aspects for democracy and tolerant societies. The European Union provides funds, expert bodies and agencies to address the history, education, pedagogy and rights aspects of Holocaust education in all its dimensions of discrimination, persecution and extermination of Jewish, Roma and Sinti populations, as well as other minorities.

Article 17 TFEU: Dialogue with churches, and religious and philosophical organisations

30-11-2020

The EU institutions engage in regular structured dialogue with representatives of churches, and religious, non-confessional and philosophical organisations, on the basis of Article 17 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). This dialogue takes the form of high-level meetings or working-level discussions, is focused on policy issues on the European agenda, and traces its origins to earlier initiatives, such as that launched in 1994 by Jacques Delors – 'A soul for Europe' – which ...

The EU institutions engage in regular structured dialogue with representatives of churches, and religious, non-confessional and philosophical organisations, on the basis of Article 17 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). This dialogue takes the form of high-level meetings or working-level discussions, is focused on policy issues on the European agenda, and traces its origins to earlier initiatives, such as that launched in 1994 by Jacques Delors – 'A soul for Europe' – which aimed to find ways to build an ethical, moral and spiritual dimension into European integration and policy shaping. The draft Constitutional Treaty of 2004 included provisions on regular, open and transparent dialogue between EU institutions, and representatives of churches and religious communities, and of non-confessional or philosophical communities. Although the Constitutional Treaty was rejected in referendums in France and the Netherlands, its successor, the Lisbon Treaty adopted in 2007 and in force since December 2009, preserved the same provisions in Article 17 TFEU. The European Parliament has stressed the importance of constant dialogue among, and with, religious and non-confessional and philosophical communities. Following the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty, it sought to give substance to the provisions of Article 17 TFEU, primarily through organising dialogue on subjects of interest for the EU and its citizens. This is a further updated version of a briefing last issued in November 2018.

European Day of Languages: Digital survival of lesser-used languages

23-09-2020

Since 2001, Europe has marked European Day of Languages each year on 26 September, in order to focus attention on its rich linguistic diversity. The European Union boasts 24 official languages, and around 60 regional and minority languages are spoken across the Member States. Europe's linguistic mosaic also includes a variety of sign languages spoken by half a million people, heritage languages such as ancient Greek and Latin, as well as Esperanto – a planned international language created in Europe ...

Since 2001, Europe has marked European Day of Languages each year on 26 September, in order to focus attention on its rich linguistic diversity. The European Union boasts 24 official languages, and around 60 regional and minority languages are spoken across the Member States. Europe's linguistic mosaic also includes a variety of sign languages spoken by half a million people, heritage languages such as ancient Greek and Latin, as well as Esperanto – a planned international language created in Europe. According to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco), many world languages, including European ones, are endangered and could disappear due to the dominant role of languages such as English with a huge population of native speakers and other learners. Regional and minority languages (RMLs) together with smaller state languages – the 'lesser-used languages' – are under serious threat of extinction. This threat is exacerbated by digital technology. The future of RMLs depends to some extent on their presence in new digital media. Young people communicate and seek information mainly via the internet. If online content is only available in dominant languages, lesser-used languages could become 'digitally extinct'. However, digital technology is not necessarily a death sentence; it can also offer a rescue kit. Online education, online language learning and language technologies can help revitalise endangered languages. To achieve this objective, huge efforts are needed by speakers' communities and language technology specialists to gather data, analyse and process it, in order to create language tools. With such tools, young people can create content in lesser-used languages and expand their use.

European Heritage Days – Women's contribution

15-09-2020

European Heritage Days have helped raise awareness of Europe's rich and diverse heritage. Yet, have they promoted women's contribution to our common heritage sufficiently or highlighted enough the female dimension of the aim to promote diversity?

European Heritage Days have helped raise awareness of Europe's rich and diverse heritage. Yet, have they promoted women's contribution to our common heritage sufficiently or highlighted enough the female dimension of the aim to promote diversity?

Buduća događanja

25-10-2021
European Gender Equality Week - October 25-28, 2021
Drugo događanje -
FEMM AFET DROI SEDE DEVE BUDG CONT ECON EMPL ITRE TRAN AGRI PECH CULT JURI PETI
25-10-2021
Capacity for proper expenditure controls of the increased budget of the MFF and NGEU
Saslušanje -
CONT
25-10-2021
Ninth meeting of the Joint Parliamentary Scrutiny Group on Europol, 25-26 October
Drugo događanje -
LIBE

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