11

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Riječ(i)
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Područje politike
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Ključna riječ
Datum

EYE event - Globalisation: In the twilight zone

16-05-2018

The twilight zone is the area beyond common legal and ethical limits. It hints at the challenges raised by shadow transactions, which are not transparent and possibly not in line with applicable requirements either. The question is how far openness and transparency should go to remedy opaque or hidden activities. Although this topical issue is not limited to matters of taxation, it is of particular importance in this field.

The twilight zone is the area beyond common legal and ethical limits. It hints at the challenges raised by shadow transactions, which are not transparent and possibly not in line with applicable requirements either. The question is how far openness and transparency should go to remedy opaque or hidden activities. Although this topical issue is not limited to matters of taxation, it is of particular importance in this field.

The Western Balkans and the EU [What Think Tanks are thinking]

17-03-2017

European Union heads of state and government reiterated support for the European perspective of the Western Balkans at their meeting on 9 March, and underlined that the situation in the region was fragile due to internal and external challenges. Despite relatively good economic growth prospects, the Western Balkans' reform progress has been slow, rule of law weak, and corruption persistent. Many Western and local politicians are also concerned about the increasingly prominent role of external players ...

European Union heads of state and government reiterated support for the European perspective of the Western Balkans at their meeting on 9 March, and underlined that the situation in the region was fragile due to internal and external challenges. Despite relatively good economic growth prospects, the Western Balkans' reform progress has been slow, rule of law weak, and corruption persistent. Many Western and local politicians are also concerned about the increasingly prominent role of external players in the region, mainly Russia, but also China, Turkey and the Gulf states. From the Western Balkans, only Croatia has so far joined the EU, in 2013. Accession talks continue with Montenegro and Serbia. The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Albania are official candidates, with Albania hoping to formally open negotiations soon. Bosnia and Herzegovina formally applied for EU membership in 2016, but along with Kosovo, it has a potential candidate status at present. This note offers links to a series of recent studies from major international think tanks and research institutes on problems faced by the Western Balkans.

Latin America's informal economy

22-09-2016

Informal employment affects around 130 million workers in Latin America and the Caribbean, of whom at least 27 million are young people, and represents nearly half of non-agricultural employment. Its incidence varies across the region's countries (from 30.7% in Costa Rica to 73.6% in Guatemala), sectors and population groups. Fighting informality has become a clear objective in the region. Some Latin American countries have taken big steps to reduce informality, applying a different mix of specific ...

Informal employment affects around 130 million workers in Latin America and the Caribbean, of whom at least 27 million are young people, and represents nearly half of non-agricultural employment. Its incidence varies across the region's countries (from 30.7% in Costa Rica to 73.6% in Guatemala), sectors and population groups. Fighting informality has become a clear objective in the region. Some Latin American countries have taken big steps to reduce informality, applying a different mix of specific policies and strategies and obtaining generally positive results; however, more efforts are needed. Moreover, the current crisis can endanger this positive trend. International institutions, such as the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the EU, are also promoting measures to support the transition to the formal economy in the region, and the European Parliament has shown a special interest in this issue. Yet, formalisation in Latin America remains an important challenge, and economic growth alone is not enough to achieve it: the ILO insists on an integrated and comprehensive approach that would complement public policies with efforts by social actors as a way to achieve broad-based consensus. Experts agree that the focus should be on workers' social and labour inclusion. This briefing examines the strategies applied by five big Latin American economies – Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Peru – based on recent ILO studies, and looks at the results obtained thus far and the assistance provided by the EU and the ILO.

European Platform for tackling undeclared work

23-03-2016

Undeclared work affects both the individual and society. It deprives workers of their necessary social and health protection and imposes precarious working conditions on them. At the same time, it creates unfair competition for companies, and damages public finances and social security systems. For these reasons, the European Commission proposed on 9 April 2014 the creation of a European Platform against undeclared work to support and coordinate the Member States' efforts in preventing, deterring ...

Undeclared work affects both the individual and society. It deprives workers of their necessary social and health protection and imposes precarious working conditions on them. At the same time, it creates unfair competition for companies, and damages public finances and social security systems. For these reasons, the European Commission proposed on 9 April 2014 the creation of a European Platform against undeclared work to support and coordinate the Member States' efforts in preventing, deterring and fighting undeclared work. Following a round of trilogue meetings at which the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council debated whether or not membership of the Platform should be mandatory for Member States, the extent of its competences and who its members should be, an agreement was forged which was subsequently adopted by Parliament in February 2016. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Undeclared work in the EU

28-01-2016

Undeclared work represents a large share of the shadow economy, which also includes illegal economic activities that circumvent government regulations. The European Commission defines undeclared work as any paid activities that are lawful as regards their nature but not declared to public authorities. Obtaining reliable estimates of the share of undeclared work in an economy is, by the non-registered nature of the phenomenon, very difficult. Informal employment, or employees without contracts, was ...

Undeclared work represents a large share of the shadow economy, which also includes illegal economic activities that circumvent government regulations. The European Commission defines undeclared work as any paid activities that are lawful as regards their nature but not declared to public authorities. Obtaining reliable estimates of the share of undeclared work in an economy is, by the non-registered nature of the phenomenon, very difficult. Informal employment, or employees without contracts, was found to account for one in six employed persons in Europe in the European Social Surveys of 2008-2009. The estimates of undeclared work across Member States as measured by the European Observatory Review are presented in the map below, along with the estimated evolution of the size of the shadow economy in the period between 2003 and 2013. The European Commission has proposed the creation of a European Platform to enhance cooperation in tackling undeclared work. See our ‘Legislation in Progress’ briefing for more information.

European cooperation to tackle undeclared work

26-01-2016

Undeclared work affects both the individual – with less favourable health, social and working conditions – and society, through unfair competition, and implications for budgets and social security systems. On 9 April 2014, the European Commission proposed the creation of a European Platform against undeclared work, tasked with supporting and coordinating the Member States' efforts in preventing, deterring and fighting undeclared work.

Undeclared work affects both the individual – with less favourable health, social and working conditions – and society, through unfair competition, and implications for budgets and social security systems. On 9 April 2014, the European Commission proposed the creation of a European Platform against undeclared work, tasked with supporting and coordinating the Member States' efforts in preventing, deterring and fighting undeclared work.

European Platform to Enhance Cooperation in the Prevention and Deterrence of Undeclared Work

14-11-2014

After an an overview of evidence on undeclared work this document presents core elements of the Commission proposal on the establishment of a European network against undeclared work, main changes in the Council's "general approach", views of the Euroepan Parliament and the social partners. The briefing concludes with an analysis of related European networks and factors enhancing the effectiveness of mutual exchange.

After an an overview of evidence on undeclared work this document presents core elements of the Commission proposal on the establishment of a European network against undeclared work, main changes in the Council's "general approach", views of the Euroepan Parliament and the social partners. The briefing concludes with an analysis of related European networks and factors enhancing the effectiveness of mutual exchange.

Mali: The Economic Factors behind the Crisis

11-03-2014

By some measures, Mali’s economy has performed well over the last decade. It has respected most of the West African Economic and Monetary Union’s macroeconomic convergence criteria, was made eligible for the debt relief initiative for heavily indebted countries, and assessments by regional and international organisations highlight its fiscal prudence, appropriate economic policy choices and macroeconomic stability. Yet a closer look reveals additional patterns that have contributed to growing disparities ...

By some measures, Mali’s economy has performed well over the last decade. It has respected most of the West African Economic and Monetary Union’s macroeconomic convergence criteria, was made eligible for the debt relief initiative for heavily indebted countries, and assessments by regional and international organisations highlight its fiscal prudence, appropriate economic policy choices and macroeconomic stability. Yet a closer look reveals additional patterns that have contributed to growing disparities, weak trust in government and public discontent. Mali’s positive economic growth in aggregate terms translates into slow per capita growth rates and Mali continues to rank as one of the world’s poorest countries. The economy’s heavy reliance on a few key sectors and persistent structural weaknesses have led to growing unemployment. The gradual reduction in the national poverty headcount measure conceals an increase in the absolute number of poor people and the persistence of poverty in the country’s Northern regions. The food crisis that preceded the recent escalation of conflict further aggravated regional disparities. In addition to its vulnerability to shocks, Mali’s challenges include weak governance, widespread corruption and the recent expansion of the illegal economy. Several policy measures have been taken over the years to address economic and social policy gaps. The European Union should support the government of Mali in building on progress made and introducing new initiatives to promote broad-based and equitable development.

Vanjski autor

Francesca BASTAGLI (Overseas Development Institute, the UK) and Camilla TOULMIN (International Institute for Environment and Development - IIED, the UK)

From Shadow to Formal Economy: Levelling the Playing Field in the Single Market

14-06-2013

The size of the shadow economy in the EU in 2012 is estimated at approximately EUR 235 trillion. The shadow economy represents a threat to the Single Market, leads to substantial budgetary difficulties and puts considerable pressure on legitimate businesses, and in the longer run, limiting the potential growth of the formal economy. A substantial reduction of the size of the shadow economy would ensure that consumers, businesses in the formal economy, and employees are better protected and improve ...

The size of the shadow economy in the EU in 2012 is estimated at approximately EUR 235 trillion. The shadow economy represents a threat to the Single Market, leads to substantial budgetary difficulties and puts considerable pressure on legitimate businesses, and in the longer run, limiting the potential growth of the formal economy. A substantial reduction of the size of the shadow economy would ensure that consumers, businesses in the formal economy, and employees are better protected and improve the level playing field on the Single Market, and could raise up to EUR 285 billion in additional revenues annually.

Vanjski autor

Patrice Muller (Project Director, London Economics), Gavan Conlon (London Economics), Mark Lewis (London Economics), Iris Mantovani (London Economics)

The Role of Small and Medium Enterprises in Developing Countries

31-03-2006

Development thinking towards small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) has shifted in its emphasis over the years. In the 1980s, led by the World Bank’s “Get your prices right” approach, small firm policy was focused on economic development through business development and access to capital. During this time SMEs were hailed, as had trade been before them (Lewis, 1954), as the new engine of growth for developing countries (DCs). By the 1990s the emphasis had shifted towards social development and ...

Development thinking towards small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) has shifted in its emphasis over the years. In the 1980s, led by the World Bank’s “Get your prices right” approach, small firm policy was focused on economic development through business development and access to capital. During this time SMEs were hailed, as had trade been before them (Lewis, 1954), as the new engine of growth for developing countries (DCs). By the 1990s the emphasis had shifted towards social development and therefore less interest was paid to fostering SMEs (CFED, 2004). In the last few years, however, a more holistic approach to dealing with inequities in the global economy has emerged, and SMEs are now viewed as a means of achieving both economic and social development through poverty reduction (CFED, 2004). During the first five years of this decade the World Bank has approved over $10 billion to support the growth of small firms, and indications from the Bank are that this support will continue (World Bank, 2002 and 2004).

Vanjski autor

Bob Fitch, Enterplan

Buduća događanja

26-01-2021
Public hearing on Co-management of EU fisheries at local level
Saslušanje -
PECH
26-01-2021
The impact of Brexit on the level playing field in the area of taxation
Saslušanje -
FISC
27-01-2021
Public hearing on AI and Green Deal
Saslušanje -
AIDA

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