8

rezultat(a)

Riječ(i)
Vrsta publikacije
Područje politike
Autor
Ključna riječ
Datum

What if artificial intelligence in medical imaging could accelerate Covid-19 treatment?

21-12-2020

Thermal imaging cameras are currently being installed in office buildings, hospitals, shopping malls, schools and airports as a means of detecting people with fever-like symptoms. Given that these cameras are not necessarily designed to operate as medical devices, there are questions about their suitability in the context of the current pandemic. This note provides an overview of the use of thermal imaging empowered with artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities, its suitability in the context of ...

Thermal imaging cameras are currently being installed in office buildings, hospitals, shopping malls, schools and airports as a means of detecting people with fever-like symptoms. Given that these cameras are not necessarily designed to operate as medical devices, there are questions about their suitability in the context of the current pandemic. This note provides an overview of the use of thermal imaging empowered with artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities, its suitability in the context of the current pandemic and the core technical limitations of this technology. The main legal responses and ethical concerns related to the use of AI in the context of thermal imaging at entry points to identify and triage people who may have elevated temperatures are also examined.

What if blockchain could guarantee ethical AI?

21-12-2020

As artificial intelligence (AI) companies and other organisations are seeking ways to comply with ethical principles and requirements, blockchain, under specific circumstances, could be seen as a means to safeguard that AI is deployed in an ethically sound manner.

As artificial intelligence (AI) companies and other organisations are seeking ways to comply with ethical principles and requirements, blockchain, under specific circumstances, could be seen as a means to safeguard that AI is deployed in an ethically sound manner.

What if AI took care of traffic as well as driving?

21-12-2020

As happens with all applications of AI, autonomous vehicles require abundant data. Information external to the vehicle is crucial as it needs to know the structure of the road and the presence of obstacles or other vehicles in its path. Internal information is also essential, as the vehicle needs to know its own status and the reliability of critical elements, such as brakes. Even if autonomous vehicles need to detect traditional signals and allocate uncertainty areas while sharing the public thoroughfare ...

As happens with all applications of AI, autonomous vehicles require abundant data. Information external to the vehicle is crucial as it needs to know the structure of the road and the presence of obstacles or other vehicles in its path. Internal information is also essential, as the vehicle needs to know its own status and the reliability of critical elements, such as brakes. Even if autonomous vehicles need to detect traditional signals and allocate uncertainty areas while sharing the public thoroughfare with non-autonomous vehicles, pedestrians and even animals, an efficient exchange of information with as many other vehicles as possible will greatly increase, not only their performance but also their safety.

What if AI could help us become 'greener'?

20-11-2020

While some argue that AI can potentially be useful or even indispensable in ‘green transitions’, important questions remain open. Should AI be only used in resolving different specific problems (for example, intelligent pollinating robots replacing a declining bee population) or should AI be employed in ‘governing’ the sustainability of complex socio-economic systems such as mobility, food, and energy? While the latter option is currently technically unattainable and may be ethically dubious, it ...

While some argue that AI can potentially be useful or even indispensable in ‘green transitions’, important questions remain open. Should AI be only used in resolving different specific problems (for example, intelligent pollinating robots replacing a declining bee population) or should AI be employed in ‘governing’ the sustainability of complex socio-economic systems such as mobility, food, and energy? While the latter option is currently technically unattainable and may be ethically dubious, it marks the axis of a political debate about possible synergies between sustainability and AI.

An EU framework for artificial intelligence

14-10-2020

European Union (EU) lawmakers are reflecting on how to best legislate for the use of artificial intelligence (AI) technology, seeking to maximise EU citizens' opportunities to benefit from the technology, while regulating against the risks. Parliament is due to vote in its October II plenary session on three own-initiative reports from the Legal Affairs Committee (JURI) in the areas of ethics, civil liability, and intellectual property (IP).

European Union (EU) lawmakers are reflecting on how to best legislate for the use of artificial intelligence (AI) technology, seeking to maximise EU citizens' opportunities to benefit from the technology, while regulating against the risks. Parliament is due to vote in its October II plenary session on three own-initiative reports from the Legal Affairs Committee (JURI) in the areas of ethics, civil liability, and intellectual property (IP).

Perspectives on transatlantic cooperation: Transatlantic cyber-insecurity and cybercrime - Economic impact and future prospects

07-12-2017

Over the past two decades, an ‘open’ internet and the spread of digital technologies have brought great economic benefits on both sides of the Atlantic. At the same time, the spread of insecure digital technologies has also enabled costly new forms of crime, and created systemic risks to transatlantic and national critical infrastructure, threatening economic growth and development. The transnational nature of these phenomena make it very difficult for effective policy solutions to be implemented ...

Over the past two decades, an ‘open’ internet and the spread of digital technologies have brought great economic benefits on both sides of the Atlantic. At the same time, the spread of insecure digital technologies has also enabled costly new forms of crime, and created systemic risks to transatlantic and national critical infrastructure, threatening economic growth and development. The transnational nature of these phenomena make it very difficult for effective policy solutions to be implemented unilaterally by any one jurisdiction. Cooperation between stakeholders in both the EU and US is required in the development and implementation of policies to increase the security of digital technologies and increase societal resilience to the cybersecurity risks associated with critical infrastructure. Although there is a great deal of congruence between the stated policy goals in both the EU and US, obstacles to effective cooperation impede effective transatlantic policy development and implementation in some areas. This study examines the scale of economic and societal benefits, costs, and losses associated with digital technologies. It provides an overview of the key cybercrime, cybersecurity and cyber-resilience issues that policy-makers on either side of the Atlantic could work together on, and explains where effective cooperation is sometimes impeded.

Vanjski autor

Benjamin C. Dean, Iconoclast Tech Foreword by Patryk Pawlak, formerly of EPRS, now of EU Institute for Security Studies Administrator responsible: Elena Lazarou, Members' Research Service, EPRS

Forward-looking policy-making at the European Parliament through scientific foresight

31-08-2017

The European Parliament's Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) Panel, supported by the Scientific Foresight Unit (STOA), decided two years ago to experiment with a process involving scenario development and assessment to explore possible future techno-scientific developments and their potential impacts, while backcasting possible future opportunities and concerns to options available to policy-makers today. This was achieved with the involvement of experts from a variety of backgrounds ...

The European Parliament's Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) Panel, supported by the Scientific Foresight Unit (STOA), decided two years ago to experiment with a process involving scenario development and assessment to explore possible future techno-scientific developments and their potential impacts, while backcasting possible future opportunities and concerns to options available to policy-makers today. This was achieved with the involvement of experts from a variety of backgrounds, together with stakeholders, using a multi-perspective approach. In this setting, various types of possible impacts are explored, which provide the foundations for imagined exploratory scenarios. From these scenarios we can learn about the possible challenges and opportunities arising from them. By communicating these challenges and opportunities to the Members of the European Parliament (MEPs), together with related legal and ethical reflections, the MEPs are provided with potential insights into how to anticipate future policy issues. The MEPs might thus be able to identify options for working towards the most desirable futures and avoiding undesirable futures, and even for anticipating undesirable scenarios. Therefore, foresight-based policy preparation can help the European Parliament stay well prepared for what might lie ahead, allowing informed, anticipatory action.

Horizon scanning and analysis of techno-scientific trends: Scientific Foresight Study

05-07-2017

This horizon scan has identified eight major technological trends relevant for STOA. First, a scan was conducted to measure controversy on social media, and this constituted an initial controversy ranking. After more detailed analysis of the main technology trends identified, a set of STOA-relevant areas were selected, which have not yet been investigated by STOA so far. These are big data, gene technology, electric vehicles, autonomous cars and impact of algorithms. A number of additional trend ...

This horizon scan has identified eight major technological trends relevant for STOA. First, a scan was conducted to measure controversy on social media, and this constituted an initial controversy ranking. After more detailed analysis of the main technology trends identified, a set of STOA-relevant areas were selected, which have not yet been investigated by STOA so far. These are big data, gene technology, electric vehicles, autonomous cars and impact of algorithms. A number of additional trend areas with high potential impact on society were identified for analysis: screen addiction, fake news and bioterrorism. Within the eight topics selected for detailed analysis from the initial horizon scanning process, keywords, subtopics, and sentiments have been detected and analysed from social media and news articles. These eight technologies are areas for discussion amongst the STOA Panel members when considering new project activities to be undertaken.

Vanjski autor

Michael Baumgartner, Bijan Farsijani (Augmented Intelligence Institute; http://www.augmento.ai)

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