8

rezultat(a)

Riječ(i)
Vrsta publikacije
Područje politike
Autor
Ključna riječ
Datum

The impact of new technologies on the labour market and the social economy

01-03-2018

This STOA study investigates the potential employment effects of new information and communication technologies, by examining the relationship between innovation, new technologies, employment and inequality. It reviews the existing literature and experiences of previous technological revolutions, and argues that the race between job creation through new products, and job destruction from process innovation, has been won in the past by the job-creating effects of innovation. It concludes that there ...

This STOA study investigates the potential employment effects of new information and communication technologies, by examining the relationship between innovation, new technologies, employment and inequality. It reviews the existing literature and experiences of previous technological revolutions, and argues that the race between job creation through new products, and job destruction from process innovation, has been won in the past by the job-creating effects of innovation. It concludes that there is an uneven distribution in the costs of digitalisation, because of the skills-biased nature of technological change - so the challenge of the future lies in coping with rising inequality from technological change. The study also proposes a set of policy options for dealing with the employment effects of digitalisation.

Vanjski autor

EPRS, DG

Extension of the European statistical programme (ESP) to 2018-2020

25-01-2018

The ESP 2013-2017 is ‘the legal framework for the development, production and dissemination of European statistics’. The European Commission is of the view that the current statistical infrastructure is not flexible enough and that the European Statistical System partnership does not yet deliver sufficient cost savings because of lack of investment. That is why, in line with the ten priorities of the Juncker agenda, it proposed an extension of the current programme, additional funding, and modifications ...

The ESP 2013-2017 is ‘the legal framework for the development, production and dissemination of European statistics’. The European Commission is of the view that the current statistical infrastructure is not flexible enough and that the European Statistical System partnership does not yet deliver sufficient cost savings because of lack of investment. That is why, in line with the ten priorities of the Juncker agenda, it proposed an extension of the current programme, additional funding, and modifications to the main text of Regulation (EU) No 99/2013 and its annex. The European Parliament and the Council also inserted amendments – mainly to the annex of the regulation, which sets out the statistical infrastructure and objectives of the ESP – to enrich the statistics used for the implementation of the programme with statistics capturing employment, quality of life, gender inequality, the situation of migrants, education and healthcare. Adopted in October 2017, the extension of the programme has applied since 1 January 2018.

Poverty risk, inequality and social exclusion

22-01-2016

The distribution of poverty, inequality and social exclusion varies significantly across EU Member States. Based on 2014 data, this infographic shows who is at risk, how equally disposable income is distributed, and how much EU countries spend on specific measures to combat poverty and social exclusion. This is an update of a document published in December 2014, PE 542.174.

The distribution of poverty, inequality and social exclusion varies significantly across EU Member States. Based on 2014 data, this infographic shows who is at risk, how equally disposable income is distributed, and how much EU countries spend on specific measures to combat poverty and social exclusion. This is an update of a document published in December 2014, PE 542.174.

The minimum wage: A motor for growth or a brake on the economy?

23-09-2015

Setting minimum wages are a direct way for governments to influence wage levels. Even though they are one of the most analysed and debated topics in economics, their impact on (un-)employment, growth and poverty remains ambiguous. For some experts, the rise of minimum wages will lead to job losses, as it increases the cost of labour. Others argue that minimum wages not only prevent the creation of a 'working poor' class, but create jobs by increasing employee purchasing power. The empirical evidence ...

Setting minimum wages are a direct way for governments to influence wage levels. Even though they are one of the most analysed and debated topics in economics, their impact on (un-)employment, growth and poverty remains ambiguous. For some experts, the rise of minimum wages will lead to job losses, as it increases the cost of labour. Others argue that minimum wages not only prevent the creation of a 'working poor' class, but create jobs by increasing employee purchasing power. The empirical evidence from OECD countries does not provide a clear answer. Over recent years, the focus of the debate has switched from the macro-economic effects to the social dimension of minimum wages. A statutory minimum wage is increasingly considered a useful tool to ensure fair wages and social inclusion. The international financial crisis widened the gap on minimum wage levels between many Member States. At the same time, it gave new momentum to the debate on 'just' minimum wages, low wage immigration and a harmonised minimum wage rate for all Member States. The idea of combining minimum wages with fiscal policy measures such as tax relief, earned income tax credits or additional income support provisions to increase low paid employees' incomes is a subject for further discussion. The European Parliament (EP) has adopted several resolutions against 'in work poverty' and social exclusion over recent years. The minimum wage is increasingly considered to be a tool which ensures fair wages and social inclusion.

Wage developments in the euro area: Increasingly unequal?

17-07-2015

In the wake of the crisis, gross wages in the euro area fell by 3.1% in 2009. They started to grow again, by 2.0%, in 2011 and the European Commission forecasts an increase of trend growth to 3.5% for 2016. Net earnings are only increasing slightly, however. Convergence in wage levels in the euro area remains static. Income inequality has increased in two thirds of EU countries since 2006, specifically for low-wage earners. In the euro area, inequality increased in ten Member States: Luxembourg, ...

In the wake of the crisis, gross wages in the euro area fell by 3.1% in 2009. They started to grow again, by 2.0%, in 2011 and the European Commission forecasts an increase of trend growth to 3.5% for 2016. Net earnings are only increasing slightly, however. Convergence in wage levels in the euro area remains static. Income inequality has increased in two thirds of EU countries since 2006, specifically for low-wage earners. In the euro area, inequality increased in ten Member States: Luxembourg, Slovenia, Greece, France, Italy, Estonia, Austria, Slovakia, Cyprus and Spain (in ascending order). After decreasing levels of inequality in previous years, the euro area is now back to 2004 levels. Being the biggest share of labour costs, the structure and development of earnings are important features of labour markets. Within a monetary union much of the pressure to (re-)gain competitiveness is shifted onto labour markets, and thus real wage developments. Yet nominal wage rigidities, increased by a low inflation environment, may increase unemployment and foster cross-country heterogeneity. The European Parliament is stimulating the debate with the aim of formulating better social and employment policy. The EP's own initiative report on the economic governance framework of June 2015 also focused on how to strengthen the social dimension.

The European Year for Development: Sustainable Growth

03-06-2015

Economic growth is a key driver of poverty reduction, but its impact on the poor depends on growth patterns and policies. It is increasingly accepted that economic growth that advances development must be both socially inclusive and ecologically sustainable. Unlike the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are expected to contain a goal on sustainable and inclusive growth. Some have challenged the revived focus on growth, both for ecological reasons and ...

Economic growth is a key driver of poverty reduction, but its impact on the poor depends on growth patterns and policies. It is increasingly accepted that economic growth that advances development must be both socially inclusive and ecologically sustainable. Unlike the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are expected to contain a goal on sustainable and inclusive growth. Some have challenged the revived focus on growth, both for ecological reasons and because they argue that wellbeing is not fully reflected in GDP figures. EU development policy has focused on sustainable and inclusive growth since 2011, with more attention devoted to trade, private sector engagement and promoting a favourable business environment. The European Parliament has recognised the role of growth in achieving development objectives, but insists on the need to include the most deprived and vulnerable, and on combatting inequality.

Employment and social aspects of the Europe 2020 strategy

18-11-2014

The employment and social dimension of European integration is a key element of the Europe 2020 Strategy, which aims at ensuring 'inclusive growth'. Four years after its launch, the European Commission has begun a review of this strategy. The European Parliament, for its part, is preparing a resolution on the employment and social aspects of the Europe 2020 strategy.

The employment and social dimension of European integration is a key element of the Europe 2020 Strategy, which aims at ensuring 'inclusive growth'. Four years after its launch, the European Commission has begun a review of this strategy. The European Parliament, for its part, is preparing a resolution on the employment and social aspects of the Europe 2020 strategy.

Insecurity in Context: The Rise of Boko Haram in Nigeria

24-07-2014

As the Boko Haram terrorist group wages war on a widening range of targets in Nigeria, the inefficiency of the country’s government has been starkly revealed – along with the urgent need for deep-cutting political and socio-economic reforms to counter a growing sense of insecurity. The north has been particularly hard-hit, with poor governance, omnipresent corruption and worsening social indicators compounding the security problem. Boko Haram, originally a peaceful Islamist movement, has moved progressively ...

As the Boko Haram terrorist group wages war on a widening range of targets in Nigeria, the inefficiency of the country’s government has been starkly revealed – along with the urgent need for deep-cutting political and socio-economic reforms to counter a growing sense of insecurity. The north has been particularly hard-hit, with poor governance, omnipresent corruption and worsening social indicators compounding the security problem. Boko Haram, originally a peaceful Islamist movement, has moved progressively towards militant extremism since 2009, regularly attacking Nigerians and foreigners, Christians and Muslims, northerners and even residents of the capital, troops and civilians, in an effort to destabilise the state. For a number of years the group was treated as an internal Nigerian problem. However, Boko Haram’s illicit and armed activities increasingly take place across the country’s borders. When more than 200 girls were kidnapped in the town of Chibok in April 2014, it was clear that neighbouring countries and the international community would need to coordinate their efforts. In addition to launching a direct response to the security threat, the Nigerian government must address a wide range of grievances to eliminate the root causes of the insurgency in the long term. This has proved a daunting task in the past, and the issue is currently politically delicate: the country is readying itself for the 2015 presidential elections, which are expected to be fiercely contested.

Buduća događanja

07-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: What is the future of (European) sovereignty?
Drugo događanje -
EPRS
08-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Statistics, Data and Trust: Why figures matter [...]
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21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Matters of Record: Inside European Politics
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