19

rezultat(a)

Riječ(i)
Vrsta publikacije
Područje politike
Autor
Ključna riječ
Datum

Establishing the European Defence Fund

26-10-2018

One of a number of MFF-related impact assessment reports, this IA provides a comprehensive overview of the problems facing European defence development, as well as the general objectives that the proposed European Defence Fund is meant to address. It would nevertheless have gained by including a more detailed explanation behind the merger of the two financing windows, as well as a more detailed analysis of impacts. Finally, the lack of more specific objectives appears to have weakened the analysis ...

One of a number of MFF-related impact assessment reports, this IA provides a comprehensive overview of the problems facing European defence development, as well as the general objectives that the proposed European Defence Fund is meant to address. It would nevertheless have gained by including a more detailed explanation behind the merger of the two financing windows, as well as a more detailed analysis of impacts. Finally, the lack of more specific objectives appears to have weakened the analysis of monitoring mechanisms and it is unclear how stakeholders' views have fed into the analysis.

The future of the European Defence Agency (EDA)

18-07-2018

The aim of the workshop, held on 22 November 2017, was to discuss the future of the European Defence Agency (EDA) against the backdrop of framing a common Union defence policy. The first speaker, Dr Christian Mölling, provided an analysis of the issue of defence cooperation among EU member states and the difficulties it faces. In this context, he described the role and power of the EDA as well as possible options for its future. The second speaker, Professor David Versailles, focused on capabilities ...

The aim of the workshop, held on 22 November 2017, was to discuss the future of the European Defence Agency (EDA) against the backdrop of framing a common Union defence policy. The first speaker, Dr Christian Mölling, provided an analysis of the issue of defence cooperation among EU member states and the difficulties it faces. In this context, he described the role and power of the EDA as well as possible options for its future. The second speaker, Professor David Versailles, focused on capabilities and competencies as well as on the interaction between civilian and military capabilities. The presentations were followed by a debate involving members of the Security and Defence Committee of the European Parliament.

Vanjski autor

Dr Christian MÖLLING; Dr Valérie MERINDOL and Dr David W. VERSAILLES

The further development of the Common Position 944/2008/CFSP on arms exports control

16-07-2018

In view of the upcoming review of the EU Common Position 944/2008/CFSP on arms exports, the aim of the workshop was to provide an overview of the context in which this process will take place together with a set of possible outcomes the review could produce. The speakers from the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), first defined the context by describing how, since the EU Common Position was adopted in 2008, EU member states performed in terms of military expenditure, arms production ...

In view of the upcoming review of the EU Common Position 944/2008/CFSP on arms exports, the aim of the workshop was to provide an overview of the context in which this process will take place together with a set of possible outcomes the review could produce. The speakers from the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), first defined the context by describing how, since the EU Common Position was adopted in 2008, EU member states performed in terms of military expenditure, arms production and arms transfers. Recent measures adopted at the EU level to boost defence industrial cooperation were also indicated as part of this framework. The speakers also highlighted the divergences in member states’ export policies which emerged in the last decade, most recently during the conflict in Yemen. They then provided a number of options that could be taken into consideration during the 2018 review, covering both adjustments to the language of the criteria and the user’s guide and measures to improve the implementation of the EU Common Position, the quality of reporting and to increase coherence and coordination of the EU export control regime.

Vanjski autor

Dr. Sibylle BAUER, Mark BROMLEY, Giovanna MALETTA – Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI)

CSDP after Brexit: the way forward

22-05-2018

The Common Security and defence Policy (CSDP) will be strongly impacted by the imminent divorce between the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU), for better or for worse. What tomorrow will bring is nevertheless still unknown. The Brexit negotiations in the area of defence were supposed to be easier and more consensual than in other fields. It does not seem to have been the case so far. The first part of the study focuses on the terms of the equation. They analyse: the new interest of ...

The Common Security and defence Policy (CSDP) will be strongly impacted by the imminent divorce between the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU), for better or for worse. What tomorrow will bring is nevertheless still unknown. The Brexit negotiations in the area of defence were supposed to be easier and more consensual than in other fields. It does not seem to have been the case so far. The first part of the study focuses on the terms of the equation. They analyse: the new interest of the United Kingdom for the CSDP, the proposal made by the UK to the EU in this area, how the EU has answered so far and what are the existing rules and practices allowing the involvement of third counties in the EU defence policies. The following part examines the potential impact of Brexit on the most promising defence policies that the EU is presently carrying out: the support to the defence industry, PESCO, the Galileo and Copernicus programs and, naturally, the CSDP missions. Finally, this study reviews the EU options on the table of one of the most difficult negotiations in contemporary history.

Vanjski autor

Federico SANTOPINTO (Groupe de Recherche et d’Information sur la Paix et la Sécurité - GRIP)

EU as a global player one year on from the Rome Declaration

15-05-2018

The EU celebrated the 60th anniversary of the Rome Treaties a year ago by pledging to enhance the EU’s role as a global player, in line with the 2016 Global Strategy. This was intended to develop the EU’s role in security and defence matters, starting with increasing support for the European defence industry and the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) as a whole, as well as reinforcing existing or developing new partnerships and pushing for further global engagement in support of the UN system ...

The EU celebrated the 60th anniversary of the Rome Treaties a year ago by pledging to enhance the EU’s role as a global player, in line with the 2016 Global Strategy. This was intended to develop the EU’s role in security and defence matters, starting with increasing support for the European defence industry and the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) as a whole, as well as reinforcing existing or developing new partnerships and pushing for further global engagement in support of the UN system, NATO and rules-based multilateralism. What progress has been made since 25 March 2017? What are the European Parliament’s positions on these issues, and what are the prospects for the future? Answering these questions is crucial for ensuring the effectiveness of the EU’s strategies, policies and actions and for the credibility of the EU project in future.

Preparatory action on defence research

27-10-2016

Investment in defence research has been decreasing in the EU over the last 10 years. In 2013, the Commission proposed to strengthen the EU defence and security sector and suggested launching a preparatory action (PA) on defence. Following a pilot project adopted in 2014, the preparatory action is expected to be adopted for three years with a budget of €90 million. If successful, the Commission plans to establish an EU-defence research programme for the 2021-2027 period.

Investment in defence research has been decreasing in the EU over the last 10 years. In 2013, the Commission proposed to strengthen the EU defence and security sector and suggested launching a preparatory action (PA) on defence. Following a pilot project adopted in 2014, the preparatory action is expected to be adopted for three years with a budget of €90 million. If successful, the Commission plans to establish an EU-defence research programme for the 2021-2027 period.

Australia's 2016 Defence White Paper

06-06-2016

The 2016 Defence White Paper (DWP) states that the United States will remain Australia's 'most important strategic partner', while pointing to concerns about China’s growing assertiveness. Defence spending envisaged in the DWP is to increase by approximately 80% over the next ten years, with a quarter of investments going to maritime and anti-submarine warfare. Australia has also launched its largest-ever defence procurement programme, with French firm DCNS selected as its international partner for ...

The 2016 Defence White Paper (DWP) states that the United States will remain Australia's 'most important strategic partner', while pointing to concerns about China’s growing assertiveness. Defence spending envisaged in the DWP is to increase by approximately 80% over the next ten years, with a quarter of investments going to maritime and anti-submarine warfare. Australia has also launched its largest-ever defence procurement programme, with French firm DCNS selected as its international partner for the AU$50 billion (€34.3 billion) future submarine programme.

The Future of EU Defence Research

30-03-2016

There is an increasing demand for the EU to become a ‘Security Provider’. This demand comes from Europe’s best ally, namely the U.S., but also from Member States themselves. For the first time ever the defence solidarity clause of article 42.7 of the Treaty on European Union was invoked in November 2015. Ultimately the demand to put ‘more defence in the Union’ comes from European citizens who wonder why Europe does not protect them in the current turmoil. From the answer to this question depends ...

There is an increasing demand for the EU to become a ‘Security Provider’. This demand comes from Europe’s best ally, namely the U.S., but also from Member States themselves. For the first time ever the defence solidarity clause of article 42.7 of the Treaty on European Union was invoked in November 2015. Ultimately the demand to put ‘more defence in the Union’ comes from European citizens who wonder why Europe does not protect them in the current turmoil. From the answer to this question depends not only Europe’s ‘strategic autonomy’, but possibly the future of the whole European project. Several steps have already been initiated to answer the call for more defence in Europe. Since the beginning of his mandate, President Juncker has declared defence a ‘priority’, called for the implementation of the Permanent Structured Cooperation enshrined in the Lisbon Treaty and reiterated the long term vision of a ’European army’. In June 2016, a ‘global strategy’ will be issued and a Commission Defence Action Plan should follow by the end of 2016. A ‘Pilot Project’, adopted by the European Parliament in autumn 2014, has been launched and should open the path to a ‘Preparatory Action on Defence Research’ that may be voted in 2016 for the 2017-2020 budgets. A natural underpinning of those efforts should be the undertaking of a full-fledged Union programme in defence research. The size, the shape and the steps to be taken towards setting it up are the subject of the present report.

Vanjski autor

Frédéric MAURO and Klaus THOMA

Implementation of European Council conclusions in Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) since the Lisbon Treaty: European Council Briefing

15-01-2016

Three relatively recent European Councils - in December 2012, December 2013 and June 2015 - have considered security and defence issues, with Heads of State or Government emphasising the need to strengthen defence cooperation in Europe. Progress was made on certain issues, such as cybersecurity and maritime security, but more needs to be done to address new security threats, develop greater capabilities and foster growth in both the defence industry and the defence market. This Briefing assesses ...

Three relatively recent European Councils - in December 2012, December 2013 and June 2015 - have considered security and defence issues, with Heads of State or Government emphasising the need to strengthen defence cooperation in Europe. Progress was made on certain issues, such as cybersecurity and maritime security, but more needs to be done to address new security threats, develop greater capabilities and foster growth in both the defence industry and the defence market. This Briefing assesses the different commitments the European Council has made in respect to the CSDP since the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty, considers to which extent they have been fulfilled, and identifies future challenges to implementation.

Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) - EUCO policy developments since December 2013: European Council Briefing

17-06-2015

  The June 2015 European Council will deal mainly with European Common Security and Defence Policy developments, i.e. progress made in implementing the roadmap established in December 2013. The Heads of State or Government will agree a new roadmap enabling Member States to deepen defence and security cooperation and to better address the emerging threats with which the EU is increasingly confronted. A revised policy implementation framework, which will include objectives and reporting deadlines, ...

  The June 2015 European Council will deal mainly with European Common Security and Defence Policy developments, i.e. progress made in implementing the roadmap established in December 2013. The Heads of State or Government will agree a new roadmap enabling Member States to deepen defence and security cooperation and to better address the emerging threats with which the EU is increasingly confronted. A revised policy implementation framework, which will include objectives and reporting deadlines, is also expected to be agreed.

Buduća događanja

01-12-2020
FISC Public Hearing on 1st December 2020
Saslušanje -
FISC
01-12-2020
Inter-parliamentary Committee meeting on the Evaluation of Eurojust Activities
Drugo događanje -
LIBE
02-12-2020
Public Hearing on AI and Health
Saslušanje -
AIDA

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