260

rezultat(a)

Riječ(i)
Vrsta publikacije
Područje politike
Autor
Datum

Third country equivalence in EU banking and financial regulation

27-08-2019

This briefing provides an insight into the latest developments on equivalence in EU banking and financial regulation both in terms of governance and decision making (Section 1) and in terms of regulatory and supervisory frameworks that governs the access of third countries firms to the internal market (Section 2). The briefing also gives an overview on the possible role of equivalence regimes in the context of Brexit (Section 3) together with Brexit-related supervisory and regulatory issues (Section ...

This briefing provides an insight into the latest developments on equivalence in EU banking and financial regulation both in terms of governance and decision making (Section 1) and in terms of regulatory and supervisory frameworks that governs the access of third countries firms to the internal market (Section 2). The briefing also gives an overview on the possible role of equivalence regimes in the context of Brexit (Section 3) together with Brexit-related supervisory and regulatory issues (Section 4). This briefing is an updated version of a briefing published in April 2018.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Energy supply and security

28-06-2019

Energy policy is a competence shared between the EU and its Member States. Whereas the EU has responsibility under the Treaties to ensure security of supply, Member States are responsible for determining the structure of their energy supply and their choice of energy sources. EU legislation on security of supply focuses on natural gas and electricity markets, and is closely related to other EU objectives: consolidating a single energy market, improving energy efficiency, and promoting renewable energy ...

Energy policy is a competence shared between the EU and its Member States. Whereas the EU has responsibility under the Treaties to ensure security of supply, Member States are responsible for determining the structure of their energy supply and their choice of energy sources. EU legislation on security of supply focuses on natural gas and electricity markets, and is closely related to other EU objectives: consolidating a single energy market, improving energy efficiency, and promoting renewable energy sources to decarbonise the economy and meet the Paris Agreement goals. The 2014-2019 legislature saw numerous initiatives in connection with security of supply. The EU institutions reached agreement on a revised regulation on security of gas supply, a revised regulation on security of electricity supply, a revised decision on intergovernmental agreements in the energy field, a targeted revision of the gas directive to apply its key provisions to pipelines with third countries, and also new targets for energy efficiency and renewables by 2030. Parliament also adopted several own-initiative resolutions in the energy field, including one on the new EU strategy on liquefied natural gas and gas storage, which is key to gas supply security. Meanwhile, EU projects of common interest (PCIs) finance energy infrastructure that improves interconnection and supports security of supply. There is growing expectation among EU citizens that the EU will step up its involvement in energy supply and security. Whereas this view was shared by just over half of EU citizens in 2016 (52 %), it is now expressed by roughly two thirds (65 %). The EU will retain a key role in monitoring security of supply throughout the energy transition from the old system of centralised generation dominated by fossil fuels in national markets, towards a new system characterised by a high share of renewables, more localised production and cross-border markets. However, the EU would need to use a special legislative procedure if it wanted to intervene directly in determining the energy supply of its Member States. This procedure requires decision-making by unanimity in Council and only a consultative role for the Parliament. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

A new association of the Overseas Countries and Territories (including Greenland) with the European Union

20-02-2019

On 14 June 2018, in preparation for the new multiannual financial framework (2021 to 2027 MFF), the European Commission published a proposal for a Council decision on the Association of the Overseas Countries and Territories, including Greenland, with the European Union. For Greenland the main source of EU funding is currently the EU budget, while for the other overseas countries and territories, it is the European Development Fund, a financial instrument outside the EU budget. The proposed decision ...

On 14 June 2018, in preparation for the new multiannual financial framework (2021 to 2027 MFF), the European Commission published a proposal for a Council decision on the Association of the Overseas Countries and Territories, including Greenland, with the European Union. For Greenland the main source of EU funding is currently the EU budget, while for the other overseas countries and territories, it is the European Development Fund, a financial instrument outside the EU budget. The proposed decision would bring together the funds for all EU overseas countries and territories under the EU budget, as part of new Heading 6 'Neighbourhood and the world'. The European Parliament, which is only consulted, has adopted its legislative resolution on the proposal, in which it calls for an increase of the proposed budget for 2021-2027, and for better account to be taken of OCTs’ social and environmental circumstances.

Foreign policy and defence challenges [What Think Tanks are thinking]

18-01-2019

The European Union will face increasingly serious foreign policy and defence challenges in 2019. The current Administration in the United States seems to be abandoning its traditional role of ‘benign protector’ of the rules-based international order. Russia, according to many analysts, continues to try to undermine the democratic process in many Western countries, and China’s foreign policy is becoming more and more assertive, notably in the economic field. Furthermore, migration, Brexit and cybersecurity ...

The European Union will face increasingly serious foreign policy and defence challenges in 2019. The current Administration in the United States seems to be abandoning its traditional role of ‘benign protector’ of the rules-based international order. Russia, according to many analysts, continues to try to undermine the democratic process in many Western countries, and China’s foreign policy is becoming more and more assertive, notably in the economic field. Furthermore, migration, Brexit and cybersecurity, as well as a lack of EU unity on certain issues, also feature amongst key challenges. This note offers links to recent selected commentaries, studies and reports from major international think tanks on EU foreign and defence policies. Links to more reports on President Donald Trump’s policies, Russia, EU-China relations and NATO are available in previous items in this series, published last year.

Research for PECH Committee - Implementation and impact of key European Maritime and Fisheries Fund measures (EMFF) on the Common Fisheries Policy, and the post-2020 EMFF proposal

15-01-2019

This Report is a research on the current performance of the shared management component of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) and its impact on the Common Fisheries Policy. Based on quantitative data collection as well as on interviews with Managing Authorities of Member States and stakeholders, the Report also analyses the legislative proposal for the post-2020 EMFF and seeks to support the Members of the PECH Committee of the EU Parliament in their consideration.

This Report is a research on the current performance of the shared management component of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) and its impact on the Common Fisheries Policy. Based on quantitative data collection as well as on interviews with Managing Authorities of Member States and stakeholders, the Report also analyses the legislative proposal for the post-2020 EMFF and seeks to support the Members of the PECH Committee of the EU Parliament in their consideration.

Vanjski autor

CETMAR, Spain: Marta Ballesteros, Rosa Chapela, Jose L. Santiago, Mariola Norte-Navarro - COGEA, Italy: Anna Kęsicka, Alessandro Pititto, Ugo Abbagnano, Giuseppe Scordella

Outcome of the meetings of EU Heads of State or Government, 13-14 December 2018

20-12-2018

The meetings on 13-14 2018 of EU Heads of State or Government dealt with a more comprehensive agenda than originally foreseen. The European Council set a timeline for the negotiations of the MFF, assessed the implementation of its comprehensive approach to migration, and announced an in-depth discussion on the Single Market for next spring. On external relations, it discussed the upcoming summit with the League of Arab States, expressed its concern regarding the escalation at the Azov Sea, welcomed ...

The meetings on 13-14 2018 of EU Heads of State or Government dealt with a more comprehensive agenda than originally foreseen. The European Council set a timeline for the negotiations of the MFF, assessed the implementation of its comprehensive approach to migration, and announced an in-depth discussion on the Single Market for next spring. On external relations, it discussed the upcoming summit with the League of Arab States, expressed its concern regarding the escalation at the Azov Sea, welcomed progress in the field of security and defence and addressed disinformation. Additionally, EU Heads of State or Government issued conclusions on climate change, fight against racism and xenophobia, as well as citizens' dialogues and citizens' consultations.

2018: Challenges and choices [What Think Tanks are thinking]

20-12-2018

After 2017 brought optimism for the European Union, 2018 has proved a year of tougher challenges and choices. It was a time of slower growth, with the spectre of a global trade war. Turbulent negotiations on Brexit brought an agreement, but the chances of its approval by the UK House of Commons look unpromising. It was a year of uncertainty for transatlantic ties and for US global leadership. Tensions re-emerged over migration. Progress in overhauling the euro-area was limited. The simmering Russia-Ukrainian ...

After 2017 brought optimism for the European Union, 2018 has proved a year of tougher challenges and choices. It was a time of slower growth, with the spectre of a global trade war. Turbulent negotiations on Brexit brought an agreement, but the chances of its approval by the UK House of Commons look unpromising. It was a year of uncertainty for transatlantic ties and for US global leadership. Tensions re-emerged over migration. Progress in overhauling the euro-area was limited. The simmering Russia-Ukrainian conflict erupted again. These and other developments form the backdrop for the European elections in 2019. This note offers links to recent selected commentaries, studies and reports from major international think tanks on the state of the EU in 2018 and its outlook in several important areas.

Brexit: The endgame? [What Think Tanks are thinking]

07-12-2018

Prime Minister Theresa May faces an uphill struggle to convince the British House of Commons to back the agreement she has reached with the EU-27 on UK withdrawal from the European Union, in a crucial vote set for 11 December. Although the deal was approved by her Cabinet and all EU leaders, the divorce terms have been criticised by many Members of Parliament, both advocates of a no-deal departure from the Union and those who would like the United Kingdom to remain within th Union or have the closest ...

Prime Minister Theresa May faces an uphill struggle to convince the British House of Commons to back the agreement she has reached with the EU-27 on UK withdrawal from the European Union, in a crucial vote set for 11 December. Although the deal was approved by her Cabinet and all EU leaders, the divorce terms have been criticised by many Members of Parliament, both advocates of a no-deal departure from the Union and those who would like the United Kingdom to remain within th Union or have the closest possible ties with it from outside. In a parallel development, an Advocate General of the Court of Justice of the European Union has issued an opinion that the UK may unilateraly withdraw its notification of intent to leave the EU, although its departure date is currently set for 29 March 2019. The Court is due to issue its ruling on 10 December; in the past, the Court has followed its advocate-generals’ opinions in most cases. This note offers links to reports and commentaries from some major international think-tanks and research institutes on Brexit negotiations and related issues. More reports on the topic can be found in a previous edition of ‘What Think Tanks are thinking’, published in October 2018.

Outcome of the special European Council (Article 50), 25 November 2018

29-11-2018

EU-27 leaders endorsed the withdrawal agreement and approved the political declaration on future EU-UK relations on 25 November 2018. After last minute statements regarding Gibraltar and clarification on a possible extension to the transition period removed all obstacles. The agreement is due to enter into force on 30 March 2019. President Tajani stressed that the European Parliament ‘welcomes the Political Declaration on the future relationship and regards it as an excellent basis on which to develop ...

EU-27 leaders endorsed the withdrawal agreement and approved the political declaration on future EU-UK relations on 25 November 2018. After last minute statements regarding Gibraltar and clarification on a possible extension to the transition period removed all obstacles. The agreement is due to enter into force on 30 March 2019. President Tajani stressed that the European Parliament ‘welcomes the Political Declaration on the future relationship and regards it as an excellent basis on which to develop [the EU’s] post-Brexit cooperation with the United Kingdom’.

RESEARCH FOR CULT COMMITTEE – Recognition of qualifications for educational and professional purposes: the impact of Brexit

26-11-2018

The United Kingdom (UK) will leave the European Union next 29 March 2019. The potential impact of the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union on the recognition of qualifications depends on the nature of the qualifications as different regulatory regimes apply to academic as against professional qualifications. In the case of academic qualifications, this issue falls within national competence, although supporting policies have been implemented at European level. Brexit should not have substantial ...

The United Kingdom (UK) will leave the European Union next 29 March 2019. The potential impact of the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union on the recognition of qualifications depends on the nature of the qualifications as different regulatory regimes apply to academic as against professional qualifications. In the case of academic qualifications, this issue falls within national competence, although supporting policies have been implemented at European level. Brexit should not have substantial consequences since those policies are intergovernmental (e.g. Bologna Process), implemented on a voluntary basis (e.g. European Qualifications Framework, Europass) or open to third countries (e.g. Erasmus+). By contrast, the question of professional qualifications is closely related to the single market and to the free movement of workers, services and establishment. Hence, a number of European directives govern the field of regulated professions. If the UK becomes a third country from 30 March 2019 or at the end of the transition period provided for in the “Draft Withdrawal Agreement”, this legislation will no longer apply either to EU citizens seeking recognition of their qualifications in the UK or to UK citizens seeking recognition of their qualifications in the European Union.

Buduća događanja

17-10-2019
What Europe is Thinking: The latest Pew survey of opinion in 14 EU Member States
Drugo događanje -
EPRS
05-11-2019
The Art and Craft of Political Speech-writing: A conversation with Eric Schnure
Drugo događanje -
EPRS
06-11-2019
Where next for Europe’s economy? 2019 IMF Regional Economic Outlook
Drugo događanje -
EPRS

Partneri

Ostanite povezani

email update imageSustav primanja novosti elektroničkom poštom

Zahvaljujući sustavu slanja obavijesti e-poštom koji izravno šalje najnovije informacije na vašu adresu elektroničke pošte možete pratiti novosti o svim osobama i događajima u vezi s Parlamentom. To uključuje novosti u vezi sa zastupnicima, usluge informiranja ili rubriku Think Tank.

Sustav je dostupan na bilo kojoj stranici internetskog portala Parlamenta. Kako biste se predbilježili i počeli dobivati obavijesti iz rubrike Think Tank, dovoljno je upisati svoju adresu e-pošte, odabrati temu koja vas zanima, naznačiti učestalost kojom ih želite dobivati (svakodnevno, tjedno ili mjesečno) i potvrditi registraciju pritiskom na poveznicu koju ćete dobiti na adresu e-pošte.

RSS imageIzvori vijesti

Ne propustite informacije ili novosti s internetskog portala Europskog parlamenta zahvaljujući RSS prijenosu.

Odaberite dolje naznačenu poveznicu kako biste konfigurirali RSS prijenos.