8

rezultat(a)

Riječ(i)
Vrsta publikacije
Područje politike
Autor
Ključna riječ
Datum

Better cooperation against tax fraud and evasion

10-11-2020

This briefing analyses the strengths and weaknesses of the IA accompanying the Commission proposal on better cooperation in the area of taxation of digital platform sellers’ revenues. The IA’s strengths are an overall good problem definition, solid research quality and full transparency regarding the scarcity of relevant data, as well as regarding the methods and assumptions underlying the analysis. Weaknesses concern the objectives of the initiative, which could have been more specific, and the ...

This briefing analyses the strengths and weaknesses of the IA accompanying the Commission proposal on better cooperation in the area of taxation of digital platform sellers’ revenues. The IA’s strengths are an overall good problem definition, solid research quality and full transparency regarding the scarcity of relevant data, as well as regarding the methods and assumptions underlying the analysis. Weaknesses concern the objectives of the initiative, which could have been more specific, and the presentation of the policy options, which lacks clarity and structure. The IA mainly assesses the economic impacts of the actions under the preferred legislative option, concluding that the benefits would significantly exceed the costs. Social and environmental effects are considered briefly, the former namely in terms of tax fairness and transparency, as well as data protection safeguards.

Tackling VAT fraud related to e-commerce

10-12-2019

Changes to the value added tax (VAT) regulatory framework for e-commerce introduced the destination principle for cross-border business-to-consumer (B2C) transactions. Identification of the online businesses supplying goods and services to customers in other Member States is going to be key when it comes to ensuring compliance with VAT rules and addressing e-commerce VAT fraud. Parliament is due to vote on two Commission proposals in plenary in December.

Changes to the value added tax (VAT) regulatory framework for e-commerce introduced the destination principle for cross-border business-to-consumer (B2C) transactions. Identification of the online businesses supplying goods and services to customers in other Member States is going to be key when it comes to ensuring compliance with VAT rules and addressing e-commerce VAT fraud. Parliament is due to vote on two Commission proposals in plenary in December.

Payment service providers and the fight against e-commerce VAT fraud

24-10-2019

This briefing analyses the quality of the IA accompanying the Commission’s proposal to transmit payment service providers’ data to the national tax authorities of the EU Member States in order to combat cross-border e-commerce VAT fraud. The IA focuses on the economic impacts, namely the potential recovery of VAT loss by Member States, which is expected to outweigh the costs of the initiative (even though benefits and costs could not be quantified with certainty). Regional divergences are acknowledged ...

This briefing analyses the quality of the IA accompanying the Commission’s proposal to transmit payment service providers’ data to the national tax authorities of the EU Member States in order to combat cross-border e-commerce VAT fraud. The IA focuses on the economic impacts, namely the potential recovery of VAT loss by Member States, which is expected to outweigh the costs of the initiative (even though benefits and costs could not be quantified with certainty). Regional divergences are acknowledged in the IA, but not assessed. The IA also admits that a key assumption, the improved cooperation with third countries, remains uncertain (it could imply counterproductive trade diversion towards extra-EU areas).

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: The fight against tax fraud

28-06-2019

Tax policy, and the fight against tax fraud, have gained particular exposure over the past five years as a result of the light shed by repeated tax leaks and the related journalistic investigations. This has added to the increasing lack of acceptance of damaging tax practices, especially since the recession and the resulting budget constraints. The fight against tax fraud aims at recovering revenue not paid to the public authorities. It also aims at ensuring that fraudsters do not have an advantage ...

Tax policy, and the fight against tax fraud, have gained particular exposure over the past five years as a result of the light shed by repeated tax leaks and the related journalistic investigations. This has added to the increasing lack of acceptance of damaging tax practices, especially since the recession and the resulting budget constraints. The fight against tax fraud aims at recovering revenue not paid to the public authorities. It also aims at ensuring that fraudsters do not have an advantage over compliant taxpayers, thus ensuring tax fairness between taxpayers. Unpaid taxes result in reduced resources for national and European Union (EU) budgets. Though the scale of unpaid taxes is by nature difficult to estimate, available assessments hint at large amounts of resources lost to public finances. Citizens' evaluation of the EU's current involvement in the fight against tax fraud has improved, but the majority of citizens in each Member State still share expectations for even more intensive involvement. Despite this, there is still a considerable gap between citizens' evaluations and expectations of EU involvement. There is still room for improvement in addressing the preferences and expectations of EU citizens. The fight against tax fraud is shared between Member States and the EU. Coming under tax policy, it has remained closely linked to Member State sovereignty, protected by the requirement for unanimity and a special legislative procedure which keeps tax matters firmly under the Council's control. This has been the case since the Union's beginnings, in spite of the proposed limited changes to the tax framework. As shortcomings have been more clearly identified, the discussion has been opened anew in speeches on the State of the Union delivered by the President of the European Commission before the European Parliament. Fighting tax fraud covers not only actions against illegal behaviour, but also the deterrence of fraud and measures to foster compliance. As a result it involves a large reboot of tax provisions, to upgrade them for the scale and features of tax fraud as it is and as it evolves. In spite of the notable deliveries during the 2014-2019 parliamentary term, there remains work ahead, namely because all provisions need to be implemented, enforced, monitored and, if need be, updated, to keep up with the versatility of tax fraud and the pace of digital evolution globally. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Protection of EU financial interest on customs and VAT: cooperation of national tax and customs authorities to prevent fraud

08-04-2019

The losses from customs and VAT fraud impact the Member States’ contributions to the EU budget. This study aims to describe the current levels of fraud and map and analyse the effectiveness of the EU cooperation measures in tackling fraud. The first conclusion is that the lack of methodology for measuring customs gap or its elements, such as losses from customs fraud, prevents tailored risk based policy responses. As a second conclusion, current cooperation channels are underused, but recent developments ...

The losses from customs and VAT fraud impact the Member States’ contributions to the EU budget. This study aims to describe the current levels of fraud and map and analyse the effectiveness of the EU cooperation measures in tackling fraud. The first conclusion is that the lack of methodology for measuring customs gap or its elements, such as losses from customs fraud, prevents tailored risk based policy responses. As a second conclusion, current cooperation channels are underused, but recent developments have been positive and new proposals are expected to strengthen the joint fight against fraud.

Vanjski autor

Deloitte Consulting Johan Van der Paal Aili Nurk Daan de Vlieger Hadrien Janne Maruca de Ramon Philippe Heeren Emma Kissane

Study in focus: VAT Fraud - Economic impact, challenges and policy issues

15-03-2019

This note, prepared by Policy department A, summarises the main findings, conclusions and recommendations presented in the study on Vat Fraud which was published in October 2018.

This note, prepared by Policy department A, summarises the main findings, conclusions and recommendations presented in the study on Vat Fraud which was published in October 2018.

Understanding money laundering through real estate transactions

04-02-2019

Money laundering through real estate transactions integrates black funds into the legal economy while providing a safe investment. It allows criminals to enjoy assets and derived funds having camouflaged the origin of the money used for payment. A number of techniques are used, namely cash or opaque financing schemes, overvalued or undervalued prices, and non-transparent companies and trusts or third parties that act as legal owners. Among the possible indicators are geographical features (such as ...

Money laundering through real estate transactions integrates black funds into the legal economy while providing a safe investment. It allows criminals to enjoy assets and derived funds having camouflaged the origin of the money used for payment. A number of techniques are used, namely cash or opaque financing schemes, overvalued or undervalued prices, and non-transparent companies and trusts or third parties that act as legal owners. Among the possible indicators are geographical features (such as the distance between the property and the buyer and their actual geographical centre of interest). In order to assess the existence of a money-laundering risk, concrete assessments of transactions and a customer's situation provide indications that help raise red flags and trigger reporting obligations. The anti-money-laundering recommendations set out by the international Financial Action Task Force (FAFT) are implemented in the European Union (EU) by means of coordinated provisions (chiefly the Anti-money-laundering Directive). Customer due diligence and reporting of suspicious transactions are tools to address money laundering. Real estate transactions involve both non-financial and financial sector parties operating under different legal requirements. Yet, reporting of suspicious transactions in real estate is limited, leaving ample room for improvement. Improvement is all the more necessary inasmuch as money laundering in general, and in the real estate sector in particular, has a major socio-economic impact, the magnitude of which is difficult to quantify. Awareness is however growing as a result not least of high profile examples of money laundering through real estate in a number of EU cities.

Amending VAT rules on distance sales

15-02-2018

Since 1 January 2015, for some mobile transactions linked to telecommunications, broadcasting and electronically supplied services to non-taxable persons (business-to-consumer, B2C), the destination principle is applicable for value added tax – i.e. the VAT should be paid to the Member State where the consumer is located, via the mini-one-stop-shop (MOSS) portal. In its VAT digital single market package, published on 1 December 2016, the Commission proposed to extend payment possibilities through ...

Since 1 January 2015, for some mobile transactions linked to telecommunications, broadcasting and electronically supplied services to non-taxable persons (business-to-consumer, B2C), the destination principle is applicable for value added tax – i.e. the VAT should be paid to the Member State where the consumer is located, via the mini-one-stop-shop (MOSS) portal. In its VAT digital single market package, published on 1 December 2016, the Commission proposed to extend payment possibilities through MOSS to online supply of goods and cross-border services to final consumers. The portal would also be extended to include payment for imports of small consignments of a value not exceeding €150. The directive, significantly amended, was adopted by the Council – after consulting the European Parliament– on 5 December 2017. It is accompanied by Council Regulation 2017/2454. See also our separate briefing on the parallel dossier on improving administrative cooperation on VAT issues: 2016/0371(CNS). Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

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