7

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Vrsta publikacije
Područje politike
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Ključna riječ
Datum

New plant-breeding techniques: Applicability of GM rules

10-05-2016

New plant genetic modification (GM) techniques have evolved rapidly in recent years, allowing much faster and more precise results than conventional plant-breeding techniques. They are seen as a promising new field for the agri-food industry, offering great technical potential. There is, however, considerable debate as to how these new techniques should be regulated and whether some or all of them should fall within the scope of EU legislation on genetically modified organisms (GMOs). There are two ...

New plant genetic modification (GM) techniques have evolved rapidly in recent years, allowing much faster and more precise results than conventional plant-breeding techniques. They are seen as a promising new field for the agri-food industry, offering great technical potential. There is, however, considerable debate as to how these new techniques should be regulated and whether some or all of them should fall within the scope of EU legislation on genetically modified organisms (GMOs). There are two sides to the discussion. Those who take the view that the new techniques should be exempt from GMO legislation generally argue that the end product is very similar to products generated using conventional breeding techniques. Those who consider that the new techniques should fall within the scope of GMO legislation contend that the processes used mean that plants bred using the new techniques are in fact genetically modified. The Commission is currently working on a legal interpretation of the regulatory status of products generated by new plant-breeding techniques, which should be published in the course of 2016. The Commission has highlighted that its legal interpretation is intended to give guidance to national authorities on the scope of GMO legislation, but that it is the sole prerogative of the European Court of Justice to render a final and binding opinion on the interpretation of EU law. The scientific community remains divided over the issue, and various published legal analyses differ, as do the opinions of other stakeholders.

GMO cultivation in the EU: State of play

11-11-2015

Genetically modified (GM) crops require prior assessment and authorisation at EU level before they may be cultivated within the European Union. Since March 2015, Member States have new possibilities to restrict the cultivation of a given GM organism on all or part of their territory. By 3 October 2015, 19 Member States had entered requests to ban GM cultivation. By 9 November 2015, bans on GM cultivation had been agreed for all 19.

Genetically modified (GM) crops require prior assessment and authorisation at EU level before they may be cultivated within the European Union. Since March 2015, Member States have new possibilities to restrict the cultivation of a given GM organism on all or part of their territory. By 3 October 2015, 19 Member States had entered requests to ban GM cultivation. By 9 November 2015, bans on GM cultivation had been agreed for all 19.

Member States' bans on GMO cultivation

05-01-2015

Parliament and Council reached a trilogue agreement at second reading in December 2014 on legislation proposed by the Commission in 2010, granting Member States more freedom to decide over cultivation of genetically modified organisms on their territory. The Plenary will vote on whether to confirm the agreed text.

Parliament and Council reached a trilogue agreement at second reading in December 2014 on legislation proposed by the Commission in 2010, granting Member States more freedom to decide over cultivation of genetically modified organisms on their territory. The Plenary will vote on whether to confirm the agreed text.

Agriculture in Brazil and Relations with the EU

14-03-2014

This study consists of: 1) an introductory section setting out the main physical and demographic data; 2) a general chapter on the Brazilian economy; 3) an in-depth analysis of the agricultural sector in terms of both production and commercial aspects; 4) an overview of conflicts and potentially conflictive issues in EU-Brazil relations; 5) and finally, some general comments on the new CAP 2014/2020.

This study consists of: 1) an introductory section setting out the main physical and demographic data; 2) a general chapter on the Brazilian economy; 3) an in-depth analysis of the agricultural sector in terms of both production and commercial aspects; 4) an overview of conflicts and potentially conflictive issues in EU-Brazil relations; 5) and finally, some general comments on the new CAP 2014/2020.

The EU Seed and Plant Reproductive Material Market in Perspective: A Focus on Companies and Market Shares

15-11-2013

This short note will focus first on the EU seed and Plant Reproductive Material (PRM) market, insisting on the size of seed companies, as well as on its segmentation, which has to be taken into account in market shares analysis. Market shares will be assessed in different seed segments. In a second section, the EU sector will be placed in a global perspective, which will highlight some of the European specificities, such as the non-GM nature of its seed market.

This short note will focus first on the EU seed and Plant Reproductive Material (PRM) market, insisting on the size of seed companies, as well as on its segmentation, which has to be taken into account in market shares analysis. Market shares will be assessed in different seed segments. In a second section, the EU sector will be placed in a global perspective, which will highlight some of the European specificities, such as the non-GM nature of its seed market.

Interactions between Climate Change & Agriculture and Biodiversity & Agriculture (Part of the Project 'Technology Options for Feeding 10 Billion People')

15-07-2013

There will be rising global demand for food and energy from the land over the coming decades resulting from population growth and economic development. This will coincide with the need to adapt agriculture to increasing climate-related threats (which will probably outweigh opportunities in Europe), whilst decreasing the impact of agricultural emissions on climate change. At the same time, biodiversity losses due to intensive agricultural practices and abandonment of biodiversity-rich farming are ...

There will be rising global demand for food and energy from the land over the coming decades resulting from population growth and economic development. This will coincide with the need to adapt agriculture to increasing climate-related threats (which will probably outweigh opportunities in Europe), whilst decreasing the impact of agricultural emissions on climate change. At the same time, biodiversity losses due to intensive agricultural practices and abandonment of biodiversity-rich farming are expected to continue. The long-term sustainability of farming is being undermined by trends such as soil degradation, declines in pollinators, the loss of natural biological control of pests and diseases, and the loss of plant and animal genetic diversity. Substantial changes in agricultural systems are required in Europe to ensure rapid reductions in agricultural emissions of greenhouse gases, as well as effective adaptation to climate change and strengthened biodiversity conservation. This report describes a range of practices and developments in agriculture that could sustainably increase agricultural productivity whilst contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation, and providing biodiversity benefits. Policy could play a larger role in supporting innovation and development in the full range of agricultural systems in Europe and in the use of certain wastes and residues for energy purposes. The report provides a set of recommended options for incentivising beneficial actions, constraining unsustainable practices, and promoting innovative options whilst ensuring environmental safeguards for new technologies that might have unwanted negative impacts on biodiversity.

Vanjski autor

E. Underwood, J. Poláková, B. Kretschmer, A. J. McConville and G. M. Tucker (IEEP) ; E. Dooley, A. Frelih-Larsen and S. Naumann (Ecologic Institute) ; S. Berman, M. Sarteel and C. Tostivint (BIO Intelligence Service) ; N. M. van der Grijp (Institute for Environmental Studies - IVM ; VU University) ; N. Maxted (School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham)

New grounds for banning GM crops

01-07-2011

European consumers have been reluctant to accept genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production. The Commission has proposed amended rules that would give the Member States new grounds for banning the cultivation of GMOs on their territory.

European consumers have been reluctant to accept genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production. The Commission has proposed amended rules that would give the Member States new grounds for banning the cultivation of GMOs on their territory.

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