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Looking to Glasgow: A scene-setter ahead of COP26

15-10-2021

Adopted in 1992, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has gathered the nations of the world with the common goal to limit dangerous global warming. In December 2021, after having been postponed for a year due to the coronavirus crisis, world leaders will meet in Glasgow for the 26th Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC (COP26) to continue negotiations on the implementation of the Paris Agreement. The latest assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

Adopted in 1992, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has gathered the nations of the world with the common goal to limit dangerous global warming. In December 2021, after having been postponed for a year due to the coronavirus crisis, world leaders will meet in Glasgow for the 26th Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC (COP26) to continue negotiations on the implementation of the Paris Agreement. The latest assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) underscores the of role human activities in causing global warming. The UNFCCC-commissioned IPCC special report on impacts of global warming of 1.5°C (SR1.5) also outlines the risks of current trajectories. There is therefore strong pressure on world leaders to deliver progress in Glasgow. Parties to the Paris Agreement were required to update their nationally determined contributions to fight climate change and its impacts before COP26. Some Parties are yet to do so, while analysis of submitted contributions as of July 2021, shows action to reach the agreed targets remains insufficient. Most key emitting nations continue to rate poorly on their climate action performance. While COP24 and COP25 both failed to finalise the Paris Agreement rulebook, and developed nations so far fall short of fulfilling their climate finance promises, expectations are mounting for Glasgow to finish the job. At the same time, Covid 19 restrictions and impacts continue to create challenges to participate in person, especially for developing countries' delegations. Recent Eurobarometer surveys show citizens have a clear expectation that their governments should handle the climate change challenge, with research also pointing to a growing acceptance of the need to change personal habits in view of transitioning to more sustainable economies. The European Parliament will vote on a motion for a resolution on COP26 at the October II plenary session in Strasbourg. The draft highlights the urgency of action and calls upon leaders to ensure a just transition and adequate support for areas and states vulnerable to climate change impacts.

COP26 climate change conference in Glasgow

13-10-2021

From 31 October to 12 November 2021, the 26th Conference of the Parties (COP26) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change will meet in Glasgow, UK, with a view to finalising the rulebook on the implementation of the 2015 Paris Agreement and raising global commitment to climate action. In the European Parliament, the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety has tabled a motion for a resolution on COP26, to be voted during the October II plenary session.

From 31 October to 12 November 2021, the 26th Conference of the Parties (COP26) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change will meet in Glasgow, UK, with a view to finalising the rulebook on the implementation of the 2015 Paris Agreement and raising global commitment to climate action. In the European Parliament, the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety has tabled a motion for a resolution on COP26, to be voted during the October II plenary session.

Policy Departments’ Monthly Highlights - October 2021

13-10-2021

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

Climate action in Hungary: Latest state of play

11-10-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Hungary submitted its NECP in December 2019. A high proportion of Hungarians (60 %) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Hungary accounts for 1.7 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Hungary submitted its NECP in December 2019. A high proportion of Hungarians (60 %) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Hungary accounts for 1.7 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Hungarian economy decreased by 35 % between 2005 and 2019, at a faster rate than the EU-27 average. Transport emissions increased by just over 19 % in the 2005-2019 period in Hungary, bringing their share of total emissions up to over 22 %. Reductions are expected as the country proceeds with its electromobility measures. The greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 37.5 % – was made by the energy industries sector. Under the Effort-sharing Decision for the 2013 2020 period, Hungary was allowed to increase its emissions in sectors not included in the EU's emissions trading system by 10 %, compared with 2005 levels, and is on track to achieving that target. Under the Effort-sharing Regulation (2021-2030) Hungary must reduce its emissions by 7 % compared with 2005. The share of renewable energy sources in Hungary reached 12.6 % in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 21 % share is focused mainly on changes to the transport and heating and cooling sectors, where changes to the existing district heating networks are expected.

Climate action in Slovenia: Latest state of play

11-10-2021

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Slovenia submitted its NECP in February 2020. More than half (52 %) of Slovenians expect national governments to tackle climate change. Slovenia accounts for 0.5 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than ...

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Slovenia submitted its NECP in February 2020. More than half (52 %) of Slovenians expect national governments to tackle climate change. Slovenia accounts for 0.5 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Slovenian economy decreased by 36 % between 2005 and 2019, a higher rate than the EU average. Energy industry emissions fell by 29.5 % in the 2005-2019 period in the country. Measures, such as coal phase-out, are expected to further decrease these emissions. The sector with the greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 45.2 % – was 'other emissions' (buildings and tertiary sector). Under the Effort-sharing Decision (2013 2020), Slovenia was allowed to increase emissions in sectors not included in the EU emissions trading system by 4 %, compared with 2005 levels, and is on track to achieve this target. The Effort-sharing Regulation (2021-2030) requires Slovenia to reduce these emissions by 15 %. The share of renewable energy sources in the country reached 22 % in 2019. For 2030 the target is 27 %, to be reached mainly through solar and hydro power, and through the use of wood biomass.

Climate action in Malta: Latest state of play

11-10-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Malta's final NECP is from December 2019. A high proportion of Maltese people (75 %) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Malta, which generates less than 0.1 % of the EU-27's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, has reduced its emissions ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Malta's final NECP is from December 2019. A high proportion of Maltese people (75 %) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Malta, which generates less than 0.1 % of the EU-27's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, has reduced its emissions at a faster pace than the EU average since 2012. However, according to Malta's NECP, the country's geography and demographics, combined with rising gross domestic product (GDP), will make it difficult to continue this trend. Energy industries account for 28 % of Malta's total emissions. While energy industry emissions dropped by 63 % between 2005 and 2019, emissions in the transport sector grew by 22 % over the same period. Malta's NECP outlines policies and measures to increase the share of renewable energy and reduce transport emissions. However, Malta does not expect to meet its emissions reduction targets under the Effort-sharing Regulation domestically, but intends to make use of flexibilities, including the transfer of annual emissions allocations from other Member States. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

The Human Right to Drinking Water: Impact of large-scale agriculture and industry

30-09-2021

Access to safe drinking water is a human right. It is indispensable to a healthy, dignified and productive life. However, a significant proportion of the global population is not able to enjoy this human right. The purpose of this in-depth analysis is to consider the impacts of large-scale agricultural activity and industry on the progressive realisation of the human right to drinking water. In particular, it considers how the European Union and the European Parliament can better support non-EU countries ...

Access to safe drinking water is a human right. It is indispensable to a healthy, dignified and productive life. However, a significant proportion of the global population is not able to enjoy this human right. The purpose of this in-depth analysis is to consider the impacts of large-scale agricultural activity and industry on the progressive realisation of the human right to drinking water. In particular, it considers how the European Union and the European Parliament can better support non-EU countries to realise this human right. States and businesses have obligations and responsibilities towards citizens to ensure safe drinking water. However, fulfilling these obligations and responsibilities is in contention with competing water uses and economic considerations and marred by poor enabling environments and power dynamics. Achieving the human right to drinking water needs to be considered in the context of trade-offs emerging from the water-food-energy nexus where water use in one sector can have impacts on others. Virtual water embedded in the trade of agricultural goods demonstrates that demand for food can affect local water availability, posing challenges to ensuring the human right to drinking water in these places. Existing good practices focus on better recognition of obligations and responsibilities through a human rights-based approach, improved assessments of impacts, enhanced stakeholder engagement and mechanisms for due diligence. There are opportunities for the EU to extend the discussion on the human right to drinking water with other interlinked rights, noting the complex and integrated impacts of water resources.

Vanjski autor

• Dr Naho MIRUMACHI • Dr Aleksandra DUDA • Jagoda GREGULSKA • Joanna SMĘTEK

Research for TRAN Committee - Alternative fuels infrastructure for heavy-duty vehicles

28-09-2021

This briefing presents the opportunities and challenges for use and deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure in the EU for heavy-duty vehicles, in particular for trucks. Details on the current state of play and future needs are presented in the context of the ambitions of the Green Deal and current legislative developments, in particular the upcoming reviews of the Alternative Fuels Directive and TEN-T regulation.

This briefing presents the opportunities and challenges for use and deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure in the EU for heavy-duty vehicles, in particular for trucks. Details on the current state of play and future needs are presented in the context of the ambitions of the Green Deal and current legislative developments, in particular the upcoming reviews of the Alternative Fuels Directive and TEN-T regulation.

Vanjski autor

External authors of the study:CE Delft: Anouk VAN GRINSVEN, Matthijs OTTEN, Emiel VAN DEN TOORN, Reinier VAN DER VEEN, Julius KIRÁLY, Roy VAN DEN BERG

Access to justice in environmental matters: Amending the Aarhus Regulation

23-09-2021

The European Union is party to the Aarhus Convention on access to information, public participation in decision-making and access to justice in environmental matters. The Aarhus Regulation applies the Convention's provisions to EU institutions and bodies. In 2017, the Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee, reviewing implementation by the parties, found that the EU fails to comply with its obligations under Article 9, paragraphs 3 and 4 of the convention concerning access to justice by members of ...

The European Union is party to the Aarhus Convention on access to information, public participation in decision-making and access to justice in environmental matters. The Aarhus Regulation applies the Convention's provisions to EU institutions and bodies. In 2017, the Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee, reviewing implementation by the parties, found that the EU fails to comply with its obligations under Article 9, paragraphs 3 and 4 of the convention concerning access to justice by members of the public. To address this non-compliance issue, on 14 October 2020 the European Commission put forward a legislative proposal to amend the Aarhus Regulation. The Council and Parliament adopted their positions on 17 December 2020 and 20 May 2021, respectively. Interinstitutional negotiations, launched on 4 June 2021, concluded on 12 July with a provisional agreement. The text, endorsed by Member States' ambassadors on 23 July, and by the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) on 1 September 2021, now awaits a vote in Parliament's plenary, planned for the October I session. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Cost of crop protection measures

16-09-2021

Existing, new and emerging crop protection practices, including mechanical techniques, precision agriculture, biocontrol, plant breeding, induced crop resistance, application of ecological principles to increase biodiversity and use of 'green' plant protection products, could help to reduce the use of conventional plant protection products and were described in an earlier STOA study. This new study provides cost estimates for various alternative crop protection practice options in the EU

Existing, new and emerging crop protection practices, including mechanical techniques, precision agriculture, biocontrol, plant breeding, induced crop resistance, application of ecological principles to increase biodiversity and use of 'green' plant protection products, could help to reduce the use of conventional plant protection products and were described in an earlier STOA study. This new study provides cost estimates for various alternative crop protection practice options in the EU

Vanjski autor

DG, EPRS_This study has been written by A.B. Smit, J.H. Jager, M. Manshanden and J. Bremmer of Wageningen Research at the request of the Panel for the Future of Science and Technology (STOA) and managed by the Scientific Foresight Unit, within the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (EPRS) of the Secretariat of the European Parliament.

Buduća događanja

25-10-2021
European Gender Equality Week - October 25-28, 2021
Drugo događanje -
FEMM AFET DROI SEDE DEVE BUDG CONT ECON EMPL ITRE TRAN AGRI PECH CULT JURI PETI
25-10-2021
Ninth meeting of the Joint Parliamentary Scrutiny Group on Europol, 25-26 October
Drugo događanje -
LIBE
26-10-2021
Investment Policy and Investment Protection Reform
Saslušanje -
INTA

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