26

eredmény(ek)

Szó/szavak
Kiadványtípus
Szakpolitikai terület
Kérdésfeltevő
Kulcsszó
Dátum

Obstacles to participation in local and European elections, inside the E.U.

15-09-2020

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the PETI Committee, addresses some major issues of obstacles to elections in general and of obstacles to participation inside the EU more specifically. This is done by focusing on Member States and examples with regard to municipal elections, and European elections, but also in general on de-facto access to the exercise of the right to vote. Various recommendations ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the PETI Committee, addresses some major issues of obstacles to elections in general and of obstacles to participation inside the EU more specifically. This is done by focusing on Member States and examples with regard to municipal elections, and European elections, but also in general on de-facto access to the exercise of the right to vote. Various recommendations are formulated.

Külső szerző

Aalt Willem HERINGA, Professor of Comparative Constitutional and Administrative Law, Maastricht University, NL; Hoai-Thu NGUYEN, Policy Fellow for EU Institutions and Democracy, Jacques Delors Centre, Berlin, DE."

European Union electoral law: Current situation and historical background

17-10-2019

The European Parliament did not always enjoy the powers and democratic legitimacy it does now. This is clear from a quick glance at how Parliament has evolved. Starting life as an Assembly – a name reminiscent of institutions linked to international diplomacy – with members simply appointed by national parliaments of Member States, it grew into an institution, the European Parliament, directly elected by citizens and now the only one representing EU citizens directly. This transformation has taken ...

The European Parliament did not always enjoy the powers and democratic legitimacy it does now. This is clear from a quick glance at how Parliament has evolved. Starting life as an Assembly – a name reminiscent of institutions linked to international diplomacy – with members simply appointed by national parliaments of Member States, it grew into an institution, the European Parliament, directly elected by citizens and now the only one representing EU citizens directly. This transformation has taken several decades. Despite Parliament's increased role, the current electoral rules remain only partly harmonised, to the extent that there is no uniform electoral process for all Member States. The current situation is that certain fundamental principles are enshrined in the 1976 Electoral Act, but many aspects are regulated by national law. This lack of a uniform electoral process also leads to differences in treatment between EU citizens depending on their country of origin and potentially deprives European elections of a truly European dimension. Several reforms of the EU electoral system have been attempted over the years, but not all have resulted in legislation. The introduction of a transnational constituency in particular is a perennially controversial issue. Some consider it a step towards the genuine 'Europeanisation' of elections, others believe that it could increase the distance between the public and elected representatives. While the co-existence of differing electoral rules under the aegis of common European principles is probably destined to last, the latest reform – adopted in 2018 – will bring in mechanisms designed to increase public participation in the EU political debate and make the appointment of one of the top EU leadership roles, president of the European Commission, more 'political', by means of the Spitzenkandidaten process.

Plenary round-up – Strasbourg, July 2018

06-07-2018

The July plenary session highlights were: the continuation of the debate on the Future of Europe, this time with the Prime Minister of Poland, Mateusz Morawiecki, the discussion on the outcome of the European Council meeting of 28-29 June 2018, and the review of the Bulgarian and presentation of the activities of the Austrian Presidencies. The European Commission and Council participated in discussions on the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. VP/HR Federica Mogherini's statement ...

The July plenary session highlights were: the continuation of the debate on the Future of Europe, this time with the Prime Minister of Poland, Mateusz Morawiecki, the discussion on the outcome of the European Council meeting of 28-29 June 2018, and the review of the Bulgarian and presentation of the activities of the Austrian Presidencies. The European Commission and Council participated in discussions on the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. VP/HR Federica Mogherini's statement on the migration crisis and humanitarian situation in Venezuela and at its borders was also discussed. Angola's President, João Manuel Gonçalves Lourenço, addressed Parliament in a formal sitting. Parliament approved, inter alia, proposals for a European Travel Information and Authorisation System, a European Defence Industrial Development Programme, financial rules applicable to the general EU budget and two amending budgets for 2018. Parliament agreed on the conclusion of a partnership agreement between the EU and Armenia and approved the reform of the electoral law of the EU. Three reports on the social and market aspects of the first mobility package were rejected and sent back to the Transport and Tourism Committee.

Reform of the electoral law of the EU

27-06-2018

The European Parliament is expected to give its consent during its July session to a draft Council decision amending the Electoral Act of 1976 laying down common rules governing elections to the European Parliament. Among other things, the new rules will put in place a minimum threshold, of between 2 % and 5 %, for constituencies comprising more than 35 seats.

The European Parliament is expected to give its consent during its July session to a draft Council decision amending the Electoral Act of 1976 laying down common rules governing elections to the European Parliament. Among other things, the new rules will put in place a minimum threshold, of between 2 % and 5 %, for constituencies comprising more than 35 seats.

Understanding US Presidential elections

15-04-2016

In July 2016, the two major US parties will nominate their respective official candidate for the 58th US presidential election which takes place in November. With less than three months before the national conventions, and a large number of delegates already allocated, on the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton is running ahead of Bernie Sanders towards the nomination. On the Republican side there is still much uncertainty about who will finally be named official candidate. The President is head of ...

In July 2016, the two major US parties will nominate their respective official candidate for the 58th US presidential election which takes place in November. With less than three months before the national conventions, and a large number of delegates already allocated, on the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton is running ahead of Bernie Sanders towards the nomination. On the Republican side there is still much uncertainty about who will finally be named official candidate. The President is head of state, head of government, and Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces. Thus, presidential elections are an important part of American political life. Although millions of American citizens vote in presidential elections every four years, the President is not, in fact, directly elected by the people. Citizens elect the members of the Electoral College, who then cast their votes for the President and Vice President. While key elements of the presidential election are spelled out in the US Constitution, other aspects have been shaped by state laws, national party rules and state party rules. This explains why presidential campaigns have evolved over time, from the days when presidential candidates were nominated in the House of Representatives by the 'King caucus', to an almost exclusively political party-dominated convention system, and finally to the modern system of nominations based on primaries, introduced progressively to increase democratic participation. A number of additional developments have also played an important role in shaping today's presidential elections, notably political party efforts to limit 'frontloading'; the organisation of the Electoral College system and the changes to the campaign financing system.

Kyrgyzstan: Closer to democracy - and Russia

28-10-2015

Praised by both Russian and European observers, the elections of 4 October 2015 are considered a milestone in Kyrgyzstan's democratic transition of the country, consolidating the new political system launched by the new constitution adopted after the 2010 revolution. With seats split between six pro-Moscow parties, the results entail the formation of a coalition government in the fractured parliament, and herald further rapprochement to Russia.

Praised by both Russian and European observers, the elections of 4 October 2015 are considered a milestone in Kyrgyzstan's democratic transition of the country, consolidating the new political system launched by the new constitution adopted after the 2010 revolution. With seats split between six pro-Moscow parties, the results entail the formation of a coalition government in the fractured parliament, and herald further rapprochement to Russia.

Reform of European electoral law

20-10-2015

Elections to the European Parliament are not conducted according to a uniform, EU-wide electoral procedure. Rather, EU law sets only some basic principles, with national electoral laws applying for the rest. Parliament has repeatedly sought to bring about further harmonisation of the rules governing European parliamentary elections, but the diverging constitutional and electoral traditions of the Member States, as well as the importance of electoral rules for the design of political systems, have ...

Elections to the European Parliament are not conducted according to a uniform, EU-wide electoral procedure. Rather, EU law sets only some basic principles, with national electoral laws applying for the rest. Parliament has repeatedly sought to bring about further harmonisation of the rules governing European parliamentary elections, but the diverging constitutional and electoral traditions of the Member States, as well as the importance of electoral rules for the design of political systems, have so far rendered an agreement difficult.

Electoral Rules and Electoral Participation in the European Elections: The Ballot Format and Structure

15-10-2015

This study aims to assess the feasibility of a harmonisation and “Europeanisation” of the ballots used in the 28 Member States for the election of the European Parliament. This is done by comparing the actual structure of ballots used in all the Member States according to some key variables, by analysing which information can be currently provided on the ballots, by describing the provisions that regulate at national level all aspects relating to the format and appearance of the ballots, and by investigating ...

This study aims to assess the feasibility of a harmonisation and “Europeanisation” of the ballots used in the 28 Member States for the election of the European Parliament. This is done by comparing the actual structure of ballots used in all the Member States according to some key variables, by analysing which information can be currently provided on the ballots, by describing the provisions that regulate at national level all aspects relating to the format and appearance of the ballots, and by investigating the legal and political constraints that impact on amending such legislation. Finally, an assessment of whether the presence of Euro-specific information such as the name of the affiliated European party, its logo, and a reference to the lead candidate for the European Commission could enhance the European and transnational character of the European elections.

Külső szerző

Luciano Bardi and Lorenzo Cicchi (European University Institute, EUI)

The Reform of the Electoral Law of the European Union: European Added Value Assessment accompanying the legislative own-initiative Report (Co-Rapporteurs Danuta Hübner and Jo Leinen)

25-09-2015

The legislative initiative report on the "Reform of the Electoral Law of the European Union", drawn-up by the Committee on Constitutional Affairs calls for amendment of the Act concerning the election of Members of the European Parliament by direct universal suffrage. In this report, the Co-Rapporteurs Danuta Hübner and Jo Leinen propose a number of measures with the aim of enhancing the democratic nature of the European elections; reinforcing the legal status of citizenship of the Union; improving ...

The legislative initiative report on the "Reform of the Electoral Law of the European Union", drawn-up by the Committee on Constitutional Affairs calls for amendment of the Act concerning the election of Members of the European Parliament by direct universal suffrage. In this report, the Co-Rapporteurs Danuta Hübner and Jo Leinen propose a number of measures with the aim of enhancing the democratic nature of the European elections; reinforcing the legal status of citizenship of the Union; improving the functioning of the European Parliament and the governance of the Union; strengthening the legitimacy and efficiency of the European Parliament; enhancing the effectiveness of the system for conducting European elections and providing for greater electoral equality for the citizens of the Union.The arguments in support of the proposals of the European Parliament are set out in detail in this European Added Value Assessment.

Political parties in Tajikistan

07-07-2015

Tajikistan's parliamentary elections of 1 March 2015 have brought the country one step closer to an authoritarian regime. Criticised by observers as flawed and unfair, these elections helped oust the only real opposition party from parliament and reconfigured the distribution of seats in a way that reaffirmed the president's dominance over the political system. The assassination of an opposition leader on 5 March 2015 has deepened concerns that opponents will face increased repression.

Tajikistan's parliamentary elections of 1 March 2015 have brought the country one step closer to an authoritarian regime. Criticised by observers as flawed and unfair, these elections helped oust the only real opposition party from parliament and reconfigured the distribution of seats in a way that reaffirmed the president's dominance over the political system. The assassination of an opposition leader on 5 March 2015 has deepened concerns that opponents will face increased repression.

Következő események

15-03-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with Vivien Schmidt: Legitimacy and power in the EU
Egyéb esemény -
EPRS
16-03-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: New European Bauhaus
Egyéb esemény -
EPRS
17-03-2021
Hearing on Responsibilities of transport operators and other private stakeholders
Meghallgatás -
ANIT

Partnerek