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Measures to advance the realisation of the trans-European transport network: Integrated and faster project procedures

02-07-2021

With the trans-European transport network (TEN-T) policy, the European Union seeks to develop a modern, efficient and climate-friendly network covering all transport modes. Despite the TEN-T's importance for the economy and society, and despite the binding timelines and targeted financial support, it risks not being completed as planned. This is partly due to complex administrative procedures linked to permit-granting for cross-border projects as well as broader regulatory uncertainty, often resulting ...

With the trans-European transport network (TEN-T) policy, the European Union seeks to develop a modern, efficient and climate-friendly network covering all transport modes. Despite the TEN-T's importance for the economy and society, and despite the binding timelines and targeted financial support, it risks not being completed as planned. This is partly due to complex administrative procedures linked to permit-granting for cross-border projects as well as broader regulatory uncertainty, often resulting in delays and increased cost. To speed up the network's completion, the Commission has proposed regulatory measures to integrate and shorten permit-granting for projects, and facilitate public consultations and the involvement of private investors. On 8 June 2020, the Parliament and the Council agreed on a 'smart TEN-T directive', with this legal form giving Member States more flexibility. The text could not however be adopted before the finalisation of the new Connecting Europe Facility programme, as the annexes of both texts are interlinked. The Council adopted its first-reading position on the ‘smart TEN-T directive’ on 14 June 2021 and the Parliament is due to vote on it during the July plenary session. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Il meccanismo per collegare l'Europa e la "RTE-T intelligente"

01-07-2021

Per garantire connessioni efficienti, moderne e sostenibili, l'Unione europea sta sviluppando reti transeuropee nei settori dei trasporti, del digitale e dell'energia. Nel giugno 2018 la Commissione europea ha proposto di rinnovare il meccanismo per collegare l'Europa (MCE), il principale programma di finanziamento delle infrastrutture dell'Unione, al fine di accelerare gli investimenti in progetti di rete fondamentali. Parallelamente, ha proposto un meccanismo inteso a facilitare le procedure di ...

Per garantire connessioni efficienti, moderne e sostenibili, l'Unione europea sta sviluppando reti transeuropee nei settori dei trasporti, del digitale e dell'energia. Nel giugno 2018 la Commissione europea ha proposto di rinnovare il meccanismo per collegare l'Europa (MCE), il principale programma di finanziamento delle infrastrutture dell'Unione, al fine di accelerare gli investimenti in progetti di rete fondamentali. Parallelamente, ha proposto un meccanismo inteso a facilitare le procedure di rilascio delle autorizzazioni nel settore dei trasporti ("RTE-T intelligente"). Durante la tornata di luglio il Parlamento europeo dovrebbe procedere alla votazione in seconda lettura sui testi concordati a seguito dei negoziati interistituzionali.

Connecting Europe Facility 2021-2027: Financing key EU infrastructure networks

01-07-2021

The EU supports the development of high-performing, sustainable and interconnected trans-European networks in the areas of transport, energy and digital infrastructure. It set up the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) as a dedicated financing instrument for the 2014-2020 period, to channel EU funding into the development of infrastructure networks, help eliminate market failures and attract further investment from the public and private sectors. Following a mid-term evaluation, the European Commission ...

The EU supports the development of high-performing, sustainable and interconnected trans-European networks in the areas of transport, energy and digital infrastructure. It set up the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) as a dedicated financing instrument for the 2014-2020 period, to channel EU funding into the development of infrastructure networks, help eliminate market failures and attract further investment from the public and private sectors. Following a mid-term evaluation, the European Commission proposed to renew the programme under the long term EU budget for the 2021-2027 period. In the 2014-2019 term, the Council and the European Parliament provisionally agreed on the content, leaving aside the budget and the questions relating to third countries. Negotiations resumed in the present term, reflecting the Commission’s revised MFF proposal of May 2020 and the European Council conclusions of July 2020. Final details were agreed on 11 March 2021. The agreement has already been confirmed by the responsible parliamentary committees TRAN and ITRE, and the Council subsequently adopted its first-reading position on 14 June 2021. The Parliament is expected to vote at second reading during the July plenary session. Once adopted, the new CEF regulation will apply retroactively from 1 January 2021. Fifth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Sustainable and smart mobility strategy – Delivered at local level

20-04-2021

On 9 December 2020, the European Commission put forward a sustainable and smart mobility strategy, outlining its planned steps to transform the European Union (EU) transport system to meet the ambition of the European Green Deal and the objectives of the EU's digital strategy. The strategy aims to rebuild the European transport sector, badly hit by the coronavirus pandemic, making it greener, smarter and more resilient, while leaving no one behind. This is to be achieved by strengthening the existing ...

On 9 December 2020, the European Commission put forward a sustainable and smart mobility strategy, outlining its planned steps to transform the European Union (EU) transport system to meet the ambition of the European Green Deal and the objectives of the EU's digital strategy. The strategy aims to rebuild the European transport sector, badly hit by the coronavirus pandemic, making it greener, smarter and more resilient, while leaving no one behind. This is to be achieved by strengthening the existing rules, proposing new legislation and providing support measures and guidance. The Commission will start to make proposals for the planned measures in 2021. Once agreed by the EU legislators and adopted as new EU rules, these will have to be implemented. While national governments will be expected to align their existing national legislation with the new requirements, the task of putting the new rules into practice will often be managed by public administrations at regional and local level. Cities and regions will have to adapt their existing systems and invest to make transport more sustainable, but also to allow citizens to better combine the available mobility options, enabling them to reduce their daily travel needs while ensuring connectivity and service accessibility. This briefing looks at the policy and other support that the European Commission is providing for local and regional authorities to facilitate the mobility transition. Following established practice, they will be invited to contribute to the design of the individual measures outlined in the strategy. They should also have their say in setting their national priorities for receiving EU financing for the post-coronavirus recovery, as an opportunity to start transforming the transport system from the local level. This Briefing has been drafted following a request from a member of the European Committee of the Regions, in the framework of the Cooperation Agreement between the Parliament and the Committee.

EU climate action policy: Responding to the global emergency

18-03-2021

The European Green Deal aims to make the European Union climate-neutral by 2050, a target supported by all EU institutions. With this objective, the EU takes a leading role in addressing the global climate emergency. Achieving the climate-neutrality goal requires massive investment and an unprecedented transformation of all sectors of the economy. This study explains the physical basis of climate change and highlights its expected impacts on the EU. To give an overview of EU and international climate ...

The European Green Deal aims to make the European Union climate-neutral by 2050, a target supported by all EU institutions. With this objective, the EU takes a leading role in addressing the global climate emergency. Achieving the climate-neutrality goal requires massive investment and an unprecedented transformation of all sectors of the economy. This study explains the physical basis of climate change and highlights its expected impacts on the EU. To give an overview of EU and international climate policies, it outlines international climate agreements, EU climate action and the climate policies of major economies. It assesses the coherence of EU climate policy with other policy areas, and presents the financing of EU climate action through the EU budget and other instruments. To assess the implications of the climate neutrality objective, the study analysis the challenges and opportunities for the EU economy and its impacts on issues such as international relations, migration, trade, consumers and health . The final chapter addresses the issues facing European decision-makers and the outlook for European and global climate action in the context of the coronavirus pandemic.

Sustainable and smart mobility strategy

20-01-2021

Transport is the backbone of the EU economy, connecting people and businesses across various EU regions and countries. The coronavirus pandemic has shown the impact of mobility restrictions on the free movement of people, goods and services and, at the same time, confirmed the essential role of transport in safeguarding the functioning of vital supply chains. However, transport also generates significant costs to society, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, environmental pollution, accidents, congestion ...

Transport is the backbone of the EU economy, connecting people and businesses across various EU regions and countries. The coronavirus pandemic has shown the impact of mobility restrictions on the free movement of people, goods and services and, at the same time, confirmed the essential role of transport in safeguarding the functioning of vital supply chains. However, transport also generates significant costs to society, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, environmental pollution, accidents, congestion and loss of biodiversity. EU ambitions to address these negative impacts have increased over the years. In December 2019, the European Commission put forward the European Green Deal that aims to make the EU carbon neutral by 2050. This goal was subsequently endorsed by the European Parliament and EU Member States. To achieve climate neutrality, the EU transport sector has to cut its CO2 emissions by 90 %. This requirement is in stark contrast with the past trend: despite previously adopted measures, transport is the only sector in which greenhouse gas emissions have kept growing. The Commission has therefore proposed a strategy outlining how it wants to transform the EU transport sector and align it with the European Green Deal, by making it green, digital and resilient. While transport stakeholders have welcomed parts of the strategy as steps in the right direction, concerns about the text’s high ambitions and lack of concrete elements have been voiced. The Commission is to start proposing the measures envisaged in 2021. It remains to be seen to what extent, with what modifications and how fast they will be adopted and then implemented by EU Member States, shaping transport transformation for the years to come.

The trans-European transport network: State of play in 2020

22-12-2020

For a number of years now, the EU has been developing a transport network across its territory to link its regions and countries, and thus also markets and people. This large-scale project – the trans-European transport network (TEN-T) – should be efficient and sustainable, and contribute to economic activity. It covers the development of all transport modes, yet seeks to shift a significant part of road transport to less polluting modes, in particular rail and inland waterways. In 2013, the EU Member ...

For a number of years now, the EU has been developing a transport network across its territory to link its regions and countries, and thus also markets and people. This large-scale project – the trans-European transport network (TEN-T) – should be efficient and sustainable, and contribute to economic activity. It covers the development of all transport modes, yet seeks to shift a significant part of road transport to less polluting modes, in particular rail and inland waterways. In 2013, the EU Member States agreed to have the 'core' network ready by 2030, and set aside unprecedented amounts of funding to achieve this goal. Seven years later, the European Commission is taking stock of what has been achieved, what remains to be done and what will not be achieved within the 2030 horizon. It has already proposed changes to the EU financial support for TEN-T for the 2021-2027 period and reviews of the relevant guidelines, and plans to propose an adapted set of rules to the European Parliament and the Council in 2021. These should better support transport decarbonisation and digitalisation, as well as boost infrastructure resilience to climate change. This briefing looks at the latest updates to the work plans prepared by the European Coordinators, the experts each responsible for advancing one branch of the network through having the best grassroots information available to them. Their views are complemented with the more general findings from reports published by the European Court of Auditors. Some thorny issues of past and future financing of the TEN-T projects are mentioned and, finally, an outline of expected developments is given, both related to the United Kingdom's exit from the EU and the EU's next multiannual budget, for 2021-2027.

Decarbonising maritime transport: The EU perspective

21-10-2020

International maritime transport is the backbone of the global economy. However, vessels release emissions that pollute the air and contribute significantly to global warming. As shipping is forecast to grow, reducing these emissions is urgent, in order not to undermine emissions-reducing efforts in other areas, to keep humans healthy, preserve the environment and limit climate change. Although international shipping was not explicitly mentioned in the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, efforts to make ...

International maritime transport is the backbone of the global economy. However, vessels release emissions that pollute the air and contribute significantly to global warming. As shipping is forecast to grow, reducing these emissions is urgent, in order not to undermine emissions-reducing efforts in other areas, to keep humans healthy, preserve the environment and limit climate change. Although international shipping was not explicitly mentioned in the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, efforts to make shipping cleaner and greener have since progressed. International rules to reduce air-polluting emissions from ships have been agreed in the International Maritime Organization (IMO). Their impact, in particular the application of stricter limits for sulphur content in marine fuels since 1 January 2020, is yet to be evaluated. Parallel efforts to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from maritime shipping have resulted in the setting of rules on collecting data on fuel oil consumption and the first collected data becoming available. In 2018, the IMO adopted an initial strategy for reducing GHG emissions, aimed at cutting shipping GHG emissions by at least 50 % by 2050, compared to 2008 levels. While concrete steps are yet to be agreed, achieving this goal will require both short-term emission-reducing measures and longer-term measures to make shipping switch to alternative fuels. Short-term guidance from the IMO is expected in 2020. On the EU front, the European Commission announced in the European Green Deal that GHG from EU transport should be cut by 90 % by 2050 and outlined how this would involve shipping. Initial measures are to be proposed by the end of 2020. This briefing reviews the existing international and EU rules on shipping emissions and their application, looks into the short-term measures under discussion and maps the landscape of marine fuels and technologies that could help decarbonise shipping in the long term.

Transport CO2 emissions in focus

07-10-2020

To limit global warming in line with the Paris Agreement, Europe aims to become the world’s first climate-neutral continent by 2050. To speed up this transition, the European Commission has proposed to raise the level of ambition, and reduce the EU’s greenhouse gas emissions by 55 % by 2030. On 7 October, in its position on the proposed European Climate Law, the European Parliament voted to raise the 2030 target to a 60 % reduction. This overview shows how transport activities resulted in about 29 ...

To limit global warming in line with the Paris Agreement, Europe aims to become the world’s first climate-neutral continent by 2050. To speed up this transition, the European Commission has proposed to raise the level of ambition, and reduce the EU’s greenhouse gas emissions by 55 % by 2030. On 7 October, in its position on the proposed European Climate Law, the European Parliament voted to raise the 2030 target to a 60 % reduction. This overview shows how transport activities resulted in about 29 % of total EU CO2 emissions in 2018. The map below gives the share of transport emissions (from fuel combustion, not including indirect emissions from electricity use) in the total CO2 emissions of each Member State, and the volume contribution of different transport modes to the EU total. While the volumes of total CO2 emissions have decreased in most Member States between 1990 and 2018, those resulting from transport show increases, in some cases more than twofold.

EU shipping and ports facing coronavirus

11-05-2020

Maritime shipping moves around 75 % of the EU’s external trade and 30 % of intra-EU transport of goods. As part of the wider international maritime community, it supports complex supply chains moving food, energy and raw materials, manufactured goods and components as well as medical supplies. To keep functioning during the coronavirus outbreak, maritime shipping, ports and inland navigation face a new set of challenges that require EU support and a coordinated approach from the world’s governments ...

Maritime shipping moves around 75 % of the EU’s external trade and 30 % of intra-EU transport of goods. As part of the wider international maritime community, it supports complex supply chains moving food, energy and raw materials, manufactured goods and components as well as medical supplies. To keep functioning during the coronavirus outbreak, maritime shipping, ports and inland navigation face a new set of challenges that require EU support and a coordinated approach from the world’s governments.

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