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Promoting renewable energy sources in the EU after 2020

15-01-2019

In November 2016, the European Commission launched the Clean Energy package, including a recast of the Directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources (‘RES Directive’), with the objective of greatly increasing the share of RES in final energy consumption by 2030. The revised RES Directive aims to provide guiding principles on financial support schemes for RES, renewable energy self-consumption, energy communities and district heating. It seeks to enhance mechanisms for cross-border cooperation ...

In November 2016, the European Commission launched the Clean Energy package, including a recast of the Directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources (‘RES Directive’), with the objective of greatly increasing the share of RES in final energy consumption by 2030. The revised RES Directive aims to provide guiding principles on financial support schemes for RES, renewable energy self-consumption, energy communities and district heating. It seeks to enhance mechanisms for cross-border cooperation, simplify administrative processes, strengthen the sustainability and greenhouse gas emissions-savings criteria for biofuels, and mainstream the use of RES in the transport sector and in the heating and cooling sector. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and resulted in a provisional agreement on 14 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018), published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Establishing the 'Customs' programme 2021-2027

30-11-2018

The impact assessment provides a good overview of the problems facing EU customs cooperation that need to be tackled after 2020, and sets out well the rationale for the new programme. However, the overall analysis is undermined by the limited range of viable options and the absence of a proper comparison of the options and assessment of their impacts, contrary to the Better Regulation guidelines. A more thorough assessment would have helped to better explain the choice of the preferred option.

The impact assessment provides a good overview of the problems facing EU customs cooperation that need to be tackled after 2020, and sets out well the rationale for the new programme. However, the overall analysis is undermined by the limited range of viable options and the absence of a proper comparison of the options and assessment of their impacts, contrary to the Better Regulation guidelines. A more thorough assessment would have helped to better explain the choice of the preferred option.

Research for TRAN Committee - Modal shift in European transport: a way forward

29-11-2018

The study provides a comprehensive analysis of the progress and potential of modal shift from road to more sustainable transport modes, with respect to the policy objectives set in the 2011 White Paper on transport. The study focuses both on passenger and freight transport, highlighting main barriers and factors that are hampering a more effective modal shift at EU level, and providing policy recommendations for the way forward.

The study provides a comprehensive analysis of the progress and potential of modal shift from road to more sustainable transport modes, with respect to the policy objectives set in the 2011 White Paper on transport. The study focuses both on passenger and freight transport, highlighting main barriers and factors that are hampering a more effective modal shift at EU level, and providing policy recommendations for the way forward.

Autore esterno

Enrico Pastori, Marco Brambilla, Silvia Maffii, Raffaele Vergnani, Ettore Gualandi, Eglantina Dani, Ian Skinner

Sector coupling: how can it be enhanced in the EU to foster grid stability and decarbonise?

19-11-2018

Sector coupling involves the increased integration of energy end-use and supply sectors with one another. This can improve the efficiency and flexibility of the energy system as well as its reliability and adequacy. Additionally, sector coupling can reduce the costs of decarbonisation. To foster the full potential of sector coupling in several end-use and supply applications, it is important that existing techno-economic, policy and regulatory barriers are removed. Furthermore, a more integrated ...

Sector coupling involves the increased integration of energy end-use and supply sectors with one another. This can improve the efficiency and flexibility of the energy system as well as its reliability and adequacy. Additionally, sector coupling can reduce the costs of decarbonisation. To foster the full potential of sector coupling in several end-use and supply applications, it is important that existing techno-economic, policy and regulatory barriers are removed. Furthermore, a more integrated approach to energy systems planning is needed. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy.

Autore esterno

Luc VAN NUFFEL, João GORENSTEIN DEDECCA, Tycho SMIT, Koen RADEMAEKERS, Trinomics B.V.

Supporting the single market beyond 2020

28-09-2018

For the next long-term EU budget framework (2021-2027), the Commission is proposing a new, dedicated €4 billion programme aimed at empowering and protecting consumers, and enabling Europe's many small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to take better advantage of a well-functioning single market. The financial envelope will be supplemented with the additional allocation of €2 billion under the InvestEU Fund, in particular through its SME window. The new programme aims to strengthen and streamline ...

For the next long-term EU budget framework (2021-2027), the Commission is proposing a new, dedicated €4 billion programme aimed at empowering and protecting consumers, and enabling Europe's many small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to take better advantage of a well-functioning single market. The financial envelope will be supplemented with the additional allocation of €2 billion under the InvestEU Fund, in particular through its SME window. The new programme aims to strengthen and streamline the governance of the EU's internal market. It will support the competitiveness of business, and promote human, animal and plant health and a safe food chain, as well as financing European statistics to provide reliable data relevant to the single market. The proposal consolidates and streamlines a wide range of activities that were previously financed separately, and bundles them into one programme. The aim here is to generate benefits in terms of flexibility, simplification and synergies, and eliminate overlaps.

European political parties and political foundations – Statute and funding

07-09-2018

On 13 September 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to amend the rules on the statute and funding of European political parties and European political foundations. The proposal aimed to revise the existing, 2014, regulation ahead of the 2019 European elections, to address specific loopholes. The limited number of proposed amendments focus on providing more transparency, improving democratic legitimacy and strengthening enforcement. However, a more thorough revision will be considered ...

On 13 September 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to amend the rules on the statute and funding of European political parties and European political foundations. The proposal aimed to revise the existing, 2014, regulation ahead of the 2019 European elections, to address specific loopholes. The limited number of proposed amendments focus on providing more transparency, improving democratic legitimacy and strengthening enforcement. However, a more thorough revision will be considered at a later date. Stakeholders shared the view that the 2014 regulation needs revising in advance of the 2019 European elections. Furthermore, the proposal came as a direct response to the European Parliament resolution of 15 June 2017, which called for the revision of the current legislation. Following agreement in trilogue in March 2018, the new regulation entered into force on 4 May 2018. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Improving energy performance of buildings

19-07-2018

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission adopted a ‘clean energy’ package to help the EU meet its 2030 energy and climate goals, including a targeted revision of the 2010 Directive on the energy performance of buildings (EPBD). The Commission proposed to leave intact the main features of the existing EPBD, modernise and streamline some requirements, introduce binding obligations on electro-mobility requirements in buildings, introduce a ‘smartness indicator’ that assesses the technological capability ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission adopted a ‘clean energy’ package to help the EU meet its 2030 energy and climate goals, including a targeted revision of the 2010 Directive on the energy performance of buildings (EPBD). The Commission proposed to leave intact the main features of the existing EPBD, modernise and streamline some requirements, introduce binding obligations on electro-mobility requirements in buildings, introduce a ‘smartness indicator’ that assesses the technological capability of buildings in energy self-production and consumption, and set clearer requirements for national databases on energy performance certificates. The Council adopted a general approach in June 2017. In Parliament the ITRE committee adopted its report in October 2017. After three rounds of trilogue negotiations, a provisional agreement was reached on 19 December 2017. After formal adoption by Parliament and Council in spring 2018, the revised EPBD was signed into law on 30 May 2018 and entered into force on 9 July 2018. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Human rights in Belarus: The EU’s role since 2016

05-06-2018

This study provides an overview of the European Union’s contribution to promoting and protecting human rights in Belarus since 2016. This analysis presents the main human rights trends in Belarus, examining legislation, policy commitments and violations of human rights. While the Belarusian government has made nominal concessions towards the EU, no systemic progress in terms of human rights has been made in the post-2016 period. The study also describes and assesses the EU’s human rights promotion ...

This study provides an overview of the European Union’s contribution to promoting and protecting human rights in Belarus since 2016. This analysis presents the main human rights trends in Belarus, examining legislation, policy commitments and violations of human rights. While the Belarusian government has made nominal concessions towards the EU, no systemic progress in terms of human rights has been made in the post-2016 period. The study also describes and assesses the EU’s human rights promotion activities in bilateral EU-Belarus relations, within the context of the Eastern Partnership multilateral dimension and in regard to financial assistance. Although the EU has expanded the range of its political dialogue with Belarus since 2016, it has had very little influence over the human rights situation in the country. The EU’s impact has been limited not just because of the very nature of the Belarusian regime. EU institutions and member states have increasingly prioritised geopolitical interests as well as the stability and resilience of Belarus over human rights concerns. The EU should increase efforts to mainstream human rights in all aspects of its relations with Belarus and find a better balance between ‘normalisation’ and ‘conditionality’ based policy approaches vis-à-vis the country.

Autore esterno

Gisele BOSSE, Alena VIEIRA

CSDP after Brexit: the way forward

22-05-2018

The Common Security and defence Policy (CSDP) will be strongly impacted by the imminent divorce between the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU), for better or for worse. What tomorrow will bring is nevertheless still unknown. The Brexit negotiations in the area of defence were supposed to be easier and more consensual than in other fields. It does not seem to have been the case so far. The first part of the study focuses on the terms of the equation. They analyse: the new interest of ...

The Common Security and defence Policy (CSDP) will be strongly impacted by the imminent divorce between the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU), for better or for worse. What tomorrow will bring is nevertheless still unknown. The Brexit negotiations in the area of defence were supposed to be easier and more consensual than in other fields. It does not seem to have been the case so far. The first part of the study focuses on the terms of the equation. They analyse: the new interest of the United Kingdom for the CSDP, the proposal made by the UK to the EU in this area, how the EU has answered so far and what are the existing rules and practices allowing the involvement of third counties in the EU defence policies. The following part examines the potential impact of Brexit on the most promising defence policies that the EU is presently carrying out: the support to the defence industry, PESCO, the Galileo and Copernicus programs and, naturally, the CSDP missions. Finally, this study reviews the EU options on the table of one of the most difficult negotiations in contemporary history.

Autore esterno

Federico SANTOPINTO (Groupe de Recherche et d’Information sur la Paix et la Sécurité - GRIP)

Statuto e finanziamento dei partiti politici europei e delle fondazioni politiche europee

11-04-2018

I partiti politici europei e le fondazioni politiche europee sono attualmente disciplinati da un regolamento UE del 2014 che conferisce personalità giuridica ai partiti politici e consente loro di accedere ai finanziamenti a titolo del bilancio unionale. Nel settembre 2017, la Commissione europea ha adottato una proposta che modifica il regolamento vigente e ovvia ad alcune carenze in vista delle elezioni europee del 2019. Il voto del Parlamento sulla proposta è previsto nel corso della tornata di ...

I partiti politici europei e le fondazioni politiche europee sono attualmente disciplinati da un regolamento UE del 2014 che conferisce personalità giuridica ai partiti politici e consente loro di accedere ai finanziamenti a titolo del bilancio unionale. Nel settembre 2017, la Commissione europea ha adottato una proposta che modifica il regolamento vigente e ovvia ad alcune carenze in vista delle elezioni europee del 2019. Il voto del Parlamento sulla proposta è previsto nel corso della tornata di aprile.

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