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EU framework programme processes: Adoption, implementation, evaluation

17-01-2018

Over the past 35 years, the European Union (EU) institutions have adopted eight framework programmes for research. The lifecycles of these framework programmes have been progressively streamlined and aligned with the general guidelines for the adoption of EU programmes. These lifecycles unfold in four key phases: adoption, implementation, execution, and evaluation, with the EU institutions being in charge of all phases except execution. The adoption of a new framework programme includes the preparation ...

Over the past 35 years, the European Union (EU) institutions have adopted eight framework programmes for research. The lifecycles of these framework programmes have been progressively streamlined and aligned with the general guidelines for the adoption of EU programmes. These lifecycles unfold in four key phases: adoption, implementation, execution, and evaluation, with the EU institutions being in charge of all phases except execution. The adoption of a new framework programme includes the preparation of an impact assessment, the preparation of the Commission proposals and the adoption of the various legislative acts by the European Parliament and the Council to establish the programme. The implementation phase covers the adoption of the work programmes and the selection of the projects to be funded. Following the execution of the research and innovation activities, the evaluation phase aims to assess the outcomes of the programmes and whether the initial objectives have been met. In 2018, a new cycle is expected to start for the adoption of the ninth framework programme for research and innovation (FP9) to be effective by 2020. Understanding the processes that take place under each phase of this cycle is important for the preparation and adoption of the key legislative acts, establishing (1) the framework programme itself, (2) the specific programmes for implementation, and (3) the rules for participation, and for dissemination of the programme's results.

Work-life balance for parents and carers

25-09-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, submitted on 26 April 2017 and referred to Parliament’s Committee on Employment and Social Affairs. The proposal is a follow-up to the withdrawal of the Commission's proposal to revise Council Directive 92/85/EEC (the Maternity Leave Directive). After the withdrawal, the Commission announced its intention to prepare a new initiative with ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, submitted on 26 April 2017 and referred to Parliament’s Committee on Employment and Social Affairs. The proposal is a follow-up to the withdrawal of the Commission's proposal to revise Council Directive 92/85/EEC (the Maternity Leave Directive). After the withdrawal, the Commission announced its intention to prepare a new initiative with a broader approach. The European Parliament has called in its resolutions for a comprehensive proposal from the Commission on work-life balance. In line with the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the Commission conducted a two-stage consultation with the social partners on work-life balance. There was no agreement among social partners to enter into direct negotiations to conclude an EU level agreement. A roadmap for the new initiative was published in August 2015 and the initiative was included in the Commission's 2017 work programme within the framework of the European Pillar of Social Rights. The Commission's proposal for a directive is part of a package of measures aiming to address women's underrepresentation in employment by improving conditions to reconcile work and family duties. The proposal builds on existing EU legislation (especially Directive 2010/18/EU on parental leave), policies and best practices of the Member States in the area of work-life balance.

The 2017 State of the Union debate in the European Parliament

08-09-2017

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker’s State of the Union address to the European Parliament, and the subsequent debate, on 13 September come in the context of the ongoing broader reflection on the future path of the European Union. This has been intensified by the first-ever withdrawal of a Member State from the Union; although lamented by most, this is often cited as an opportunity to rebuild the Union on stronger grounds. The debate will therefore feed into a larger reflection process ...

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker’s State of the Union address to the European Parliament, and the subsequent debate, on 13 September come in the context of the ongoing broader reflection on the future path of the European Union. This has been intensified by the first-ever withdrawal of a Member State from the Union; although lamented by most, this is often cited as an opportunity to rebuild the Union on stronger grounds. The debate will therefore feed into a larger reflection process, to which Parliament contributed three landmark resolutions, launched by EU-27 leaders in the Rome declaration of 25 March 2017. As announced in President Juncker’s 2016 State of the Union speech, the Commission published a white paper on the future of Europe, identifying five scenarios for the further course of the Union. The Commission President has recently pointed to a sixth scenario to be revealed in his State of the Union speech. The State of the Union debate forms part of the process for the adoption of the annual Commission Work Programme and thus plays an important role in identifying major political priorities to be agreed in interinstitutional dialogue. This briefing is an update of an earlier one of September 2016, PE 586.665.

Hearing of Commissioner-designate Sir Julian King

08-09-2016

On 12 September, Parliament's Civil Liberties Committee will hold a hearing of Commissioner-designate Sir Julian King (Security Union). He has been nominated as a result of the resignation of Lord Hill following the outcome of the UK referendum on withdrawal from the Union. Under the EU Treaties, a new Member of the Commission is appointed by the Council by common accord with the Commission President, after consulting Parliament.

On 12 September, Parliament's Civil Liberties Committee will hold a hearing of Commissioner-designate Sir Julian King (Security Union). He has been nominated as a result of the resignation of Lord Hill following the outcome of the UK referendum on withdrawal from the Union. Under the EU Treaties, a new Member of the Commission is appointed by the Council by common accord with the Commission President, after consulting Parliament.

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