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Tackling deepfakes in European policy

30-07-2021

The emergence of a new generation of digitally manipulated media – also known as deepfakes – has generated substantial concerns about possible misuse. In response to these concerns, this report assesses the technical, societal and regulatory aspects of deepfakes. The rapid development and spread of deepfakes is taking place within the wider context of a changing media system. An assessment of the risks associated with deepfakes shows that they can be psychological, financial and societal in nature ...

The emergence of a new generation of digitally manipulated media – also known as deepfakes – has generated substantial concerns about possible misuse. In response to these concerns, this report assesses the technical, societal and regulatory aspects of deepfakes. The rapid development and spread of deepfakes is taking place within the wider context of a changing media system. An assessment of the risks associated with deepfakes shows that they can be psychological, financial and societal in nature, and their impacts can range from the individual to the societal level. The report identifies five dimensions of the deepfake lifecycle that policy-makers could take into account to prevent and address the adverse impacts of deepfakes. The report includes policy options under each of the five dimensions, which could be incorporated into the AI legislative framework, the digital service act package and beyond. A combination of measures will likely be necessary to limit the risks of deepfakes, while harnessing their potential.

Autore esterno

This study has been written by Mariëtte van Huijstee, Pieter van Boheemen and Djurre Das (Rathenau Institute, The Netherlands), Linda Nierling and Jutta Jahnel (Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany), Murat Karaboga (Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research, Germany) and Martin Fatun (Technology Centre of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic - TC ASCR), with the assistance of Linda Kool (Rathenau Institute) and Joost Gerritsen (Legal Beetle), at the request of the Panel for the Future of Science and Technology (STOA) and managed by the Scientific Foresight Unit, within the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (EPRS) of the Secretariat of the European Parliament.

Application of the equal pay principle through pay transparency measures

22-07-2021

This briefing provides an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the impact assessment (IA) accompanying the Commission proposal for a directive aimed at strengthening the application of the principle of equal pay for equal work or work of equal value between men and women, enshrined in Article 119 of the Treaty of Rome. Following two negative opinions of the Regulatory Scrutiny Board and an exceptional third positive one, the IA provides a good problem definition. The IA coherently ...

This briefing provides an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the impact assessment (IA) accompanying the Commission proposal for a directive aimed at strengthening the application of the principle of equal pay for equal work or work of equal value between men and women, enshrined in Article 119 of the Treaty of Rome. Following two negative opinions of the Regulatory Scrutiny Board and an exceptional third positive one, the IA provides a good problem definition. The IA coherently identifies the problem drivers and makes a compelling case for the consequences should situation remain unchanged. The options retained for assessment seem built around a pre-selected preferred option package. The analysis regarding the impact on SMEs appears to be insufficiently developed while the one on competitiveness is missing. The proposal includes all the measures presented in the IA's preferred package as well as two extra measures which were suggested, but not explicitly included in the preferred package.

LGBTI rights in the EU, recent developments following the Hungarian law

06-07-2021

On 15 June 2021, the Hungarian Parliament adopted a law originally intended to fight paedophilia, which, following amendments proposed by Members from the ruling Fidesz party, contains clauses prohibiting the portrayal of homosexuality and gender-reassignment to minors. Additionally, the law prohibits homosexuality and gender reassignment from being featured in sex education classes, and stipulates that such classes can now only be taught by registered organisations. Furthermore, changes to the Business ...

On 15 June 2021, the Hungarian Parliament adopted a law originally intended to fight paedophilia, which, following amendments proposed by Members from the ruling Fidesz party, contains clauses prohibiting the portrayal of homosexuality and gender-reassignment to minors. Additionally, the law prohibits homosexuality and gender reassignment from being featured in sex education classes, and stipulates that such classes can now only be taught by registered organisations. Furthermore, changes to the Business Advertising Law and to the Media Law require that adverts and content featuring LGBTI people must be rated as Category V (i.e. not recommended for minors). The law is due to come into force on 8 July and has generated widespread criticism at EU level. The law is due to be discussed during the European Parliament's July 2021 plenary session, following statements from the European Commission and the Council.

Workshop Large Sporting Events: Human Rights as a Game Changer?

06-07-2021

Large sporting events such as the football World Cup or the Olympic Games can have a considerable impact on a variety of human rights, including the rights of citizens in the host countries; the fundamental freedoms of athletes, journalists and spectators; and the rights of workers involved in construction sites and supply chains. In recent years, international sports federations and other stakeholders have increasingly acknowledged their role in promoting and respecting human rights by adopting ...

Large sporting events such as the football World Cup or the Olympic Games can have a considerable impact on a variety of human rights, including the rights of citizens in the host countries; the fundamental freedoms of athletes, journalists and spectators; and the rights of workers involved in construction sites and supply chains. In recent years, international sports federations and other stakeholders have increasingly acknowledged their role in promoting and respecting human rights by adopting strategies, appointing dedicated bodies and including human rights criteria in the bidding and selection process for hosting states. This workshop, requested by the Subcommittee on Human Rights, and organised in association with the Committee on Culture and Education, examined the progress made by sports governing bodies, in addition to the EU’s potential role in advocating for a coherent, human rights-based approach to sports events. The two briefings presented at the workshop analyse the legal human rights provisions in existing bidding and hosting regulations, as well as the political context for promoting human rights through large sporting events, including the potential linkages between human rights objectives and sustainable development goals.

Autore esterno

Daniela HEERDT, Hans Erik NÆSS

Disinformation campaigns about LGBTI+ people in the EU and foreign influence

02-07-2021

The purpose of this briefing is to give a concise overview of disinformation, misinformation and propaganda campaigns about LGBTI+ persons and rights, originating from or being supported and/or multiplied by actors outside the EU. Based on a review of existing literature, the briefing examines the main narratives used, supported and circulated, as well as which actors or group of actors are involved. Where available, information on methods, funding and impacts on European values is provided. The ...

The purpose of this briefing is to give a concise overview of disinformation, misinformation and propaganda campaigns about LGBTI+ persons and rights, originating from or being supported and/or multiplied by actors outside the EU. Based on a review of existing literature, the briefing examines the main narratives used, supported and circulated, as well as which actors or group of actors are involved. Where available, information on methods, funding and impacts on European values is provided. The main narratives identified include negative othering, opposing a ‘gender ideology’, ‘heteroactivism’, restoring a ‘natural’ order, ‘colonialism’ and child safety. The briefing concludes that there is a need for more research, further harmonisation of legal frameworks, the scrutiny of financial flows and strengthened capacity to detect disinformation, misinformation, propaganda and hate speech.

Autore esterno

Cecilia STRAND, Jakob SVENSSON, Roland BLOMEYER, Margarita SANZ

Monthly Highlights Newsletter - July 2021

01-07-2021

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

Bridging the gender gap in digital, research and industry: What is the way forward?

30-06-2021

These proceedings summarise the discussions that took place during the ITRE workshop held on June 17th, 2021, aimed to analyse the existing gender gaps in the digital sector. It was structured in three sessions, each consisting of two presentations, and a final Q&A round. Stereotypes hindering a greater participation of women in the digital sector, the role of women in the digital entrepreneurship ecosystem and the current situation of women in the Artificial Intelligence industry were addressed. ...

These proceedings summarise the discussions that took place during the ITRE workshop held on June 17th, 2021, aimed to analyse the existing gender gaps in the digital sector. It was structured in three sessions, each consisting of two presentations, and a final Q&A round. Stereotypes hindering a greater participation of women in the digital sector, the role of women in the digital entrepreneurship ecosystem and the current situation of women in the Artificial Intelligence industry were addressed.

Autore esterno

Juan Pablo VILLAR; Julio BLAZQUEZ; Carlota TARIN

The impact of disinformation campaigns about migrants and minority groups in the EU

24-06-2021

This analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Special Committee on Foreign Interference in all Democratic Processes in the European Union, including Disinformation (INGE), aims to explore the impact of disinformation activity originated or amplified from abroad targeting minorities in the EU over the years 2018-2021. While disinformation has become all-pervasive, it can be considered as yet another tool being used to target vulnerable groups in society. Looking at recent disinformation ...

This analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Special Committee on Foreign Interference in all Democratic Processes in the European Union, including Disinformation (INGE), aims to explore the impact of disinformation activity originated or amplified from abroad targeting minorities in the EU over the years 2018-2021. While disinformation has become all-pervasive, it can be considered as yet another tool being used to target vulnerable groups in society. Looking at recent disinformation campaigns that ethnic, religious and cultural minorities have been subjected to, this study finds both direct and indirect links between disinformation and fundamental rights, such as human dignity or physical and mental integrity, along with core European values, including equality, the rule of law and solidarity. The Roma are found to be victims of domestic disinformation, while migrants and the Jewish community are targeted by the Kremlin. The research found that disinformation by foreign and domestic actors as well as disinformation and organic content are increasingly merging, rendering measures to stop foreign disinformation more difficult.

Autore esterno

Judit SZAKÁCS, Éva BOGNÁR

Studies with a ‘Covid 19 angle’

23-06-2021

When the pandemic loomed over us in spring 2020, we asked experts to analyze whether it was possible to introduce a Covid angle into their studies. In many cases, it seemed prima facie a bit far-fetched. However, it soon became apparent that even in our area of work there were interesting aspects to investigate. This publication groups together the most relevant parts of the studies published so far and in which a Covid 19 angle has been presented and discussed.

When the pandemic loomed over us in spring 2020, we asked experts to analyze whether it was possible to introduce a Covid angle into their studies. In many cases, it seemed prima facie a bit far-fetched. However, it soon became apparent that even in our area of work there were interesting aspects to investigate. This publication groups together the most relevant parts of the studies published so far and in which a Covid 19 angle has been presented and discussed.

Gender-based violence as a new area of crime listed in Article 83(1) TFEU - European added value assessment

14-06-2021

This European added value assessment (EAVA) supports the European Parliament's legislative-initiative report on a 'Proposal for a Council decision to identify gender-based violence as a new area of crime listed in Article 83(1) TFEU', 2021/2035(INL). The assessment reviews the significant harm generated by gender-based violence in the EU and presents evidence supporting the classification of gender-based violence as a particularly serious crime with a cross-border dimension. Through improving prevention ...

This European added value assessment (EAVA) supports the European Parliament's legislative-initiative report on a 'Proposal for a Council decision to identify gender-based violence as a new area of crime listed in Article 83(1) TFEU', 2021/2035(INL). The assessment reviews the significant harm generated by gender-based violence in the EU and presents evidence supporting the classification of gender-based violence as a particularly serious crime with a cross-border dimension. Through improving prevention, prosecution and protection, EU action could generate significant benefits to victims and society; considering only the economic dimension, by decreasing the incidence of gender-based violence, it could generate benefits in the order of €25.1 billion in the short term and between €54.4 billion and €83.9 billion in the longer term. Moreover, the EAVA identifies complementary EU action that could enhance the European added value of this policy option, such as expanding the mandate of the equality bodies, promoting the quality of survey and administrative data and supporting education activities and training.

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