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EU4Health programme

22-04-2021

On 28 May 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on a new health programme (EU4Health) for 2021 to 2027. Announced as part of the Next Generation EU (NGEU) recovery instrument, according to the Commission, the EU4Health programme is intended to boost the EU's preparedness for major cross-border health threats and improve health systems' resilience. EU4Health would be a stand-alone, dedicated funding programme with an originally proposed budget of €10.4 billion (in current ...

On 28 May 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on a new health programme (EU4Health) for 2021 to 2027. Announced as part of the Next Generation EU (NGEU) recovery instrument, according to the Commission, the EU4Health programme is intended to boost the EU's preparedness for major cross-border health threats and improve health systems' resilience. EU4Health would be a stand-alone, dedicated funding programme with an originally proposed budget of €10.4 billion (in current prices). However, during the negotiations on the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework (MFF) and NGEU, the budget for EU4Health was revised downwards, with the July 2020 European Council conclusions allocating the programme €1.7 billion. On 14 December 2020, Parliament and Council reached a provisional agreement on the programme, including a budget of €5.1 billion. Stakeholders had broadly welcomed the proposal, but generally regretted the European Council's reduction of the financial envelope allocated to it. The co-legislators' December agreement on an increased budget was thus positively received. After adoption by the Parliament and Council in March 2021, based on the text agreed in trilogue, the final act was signed by the presidents of the co-legislators on 24 March 2021. Regulation (EU) 2021/522 entered into force on 27 March 2021 and applies retroactively from 1 January 2021. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Building up resilience to cross-border health threats: Moving towards a European health union

20-04-2021

On 11 November 2020, the European Commission put forward a proposal for a regulation on serious cross-border threats to health. In the light of lessons learned from the Covid-19 crisis, it aims to strengthen the EU's health security by revising Decision No 1082/2013/EU (the 'Cross-Border Health Threats Decision'). The proposal was presented in a package that also includes proposals to strengthen the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA), ...

On 11 November 2020, the European Commission put forward a proposal for a regulation on serious cross-border threats to health. In the light of lessons learned from the Covid-19 crisis, it aims to strengthen the EU's health security by revising Decision No 1082/2013/EU (the 'Cross-Border Health Threats Decision'). The proposal was presented in a package that also includes proposals to strengthen the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA), as first steps towards a European health union. Stakeholders widely welcome the proposal and the package. Some say it could be improved further, suggesting concrete elements, while others think it should go beyond crisis preparedness. Still others consider it a springboard to a bigger role for the European Union (EU) in health. Parliament has repeatedly called for stronger cooperation on health, for a new regulation to replace the Cross-Border Health Threats Decision, and for revised mandates of both the ECDC and the EMA. Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety is responsible for the file and the rapporteur's draft report is expected to be presented in committee on 22 April 2021. In Council, work is ongoing in the working party on pharmaceuticals and medical devices. First edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Limits on exposure to carcinogens and mutagens at work: Fourth proposal

31-03-2021

The European Commission has proposed to amend Directive 2004/37/EC, by expanding its scope and by including and/or revising occupational exposure limit values for a number of cancer- or mutation-causing chemical agents. The initiative is proceeding in steps and has now become a continuous process. Following on from three previous legislative amendments, which covered a total of 26 priority chemical agents, the present (fourth) proposal addresses an additional three. The proposal was announced as ...

The European Commission has proposed to amend Directive 2004/37/EC, by expanding its scope and by including and/or revising occupational exposure limit values for a number of cancer- or mutation-causing chemical agents. The initiative is proceeding in steps and has now become a continuous process. Following on from three previous legislative amendments, which covered a total of 26 priority chemical agents, the present (fourth) proposal addresses an additional three. The proposal was announced as one of the first measures of the Commission's commitment to fight cancer under Europe's Beating Cancer Plan. Broad discussions with scientists and social partners fed into all four proposals. The Commission's feedback period on the proposal ran until November 2020. While broadly welcoming the proposal, professional organisations, trade unions and patient groups would like carcinogenic and mutagenic hazardous medicines as well as substances toxic for reproduction to be brought within the scope of the current proposal. Parliament's Committee on Employment and Social Affairs (EMPL) is in charge of the file. The rapporteur's draft report was considered in the EMPL meeting on 27 January 2021 and adopted on 25 March 2021. The Council agreed its position on 25 November 2020. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Europe's Beating Cancer plan: Quick overview and initial reactions

24-03-2021

On 3 February 2021, the European Commission presented Europe's Beating Cancer plan, slightly delayed on account of the pandemic. The plan is a key European Union (EU) public health initiative and a cornerstone of the European health union process launched in November 2020. Responsibility for health lies primarily with the governments of the individual EU Member States. Europe's Beating Cancer plan sets out actions to support, coordinate or supplement Member States' efforts at every stage of the disease ...

On 3 February 2021, the European Commission presented Europe's Beating Cancer plan, slightly delayed on account of the pandemic. The plan is a key European Union (EU) public health initiative and a cornerstone of the European health union process launched in November 2020. Responsibility for health lies primarily with the governments of the individual EU Member States. Europe's Beating Cancer plan sets out actions to support, coordinate or supplement Member States' efforts at every stage of the disease: from prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment, to an improved quality of life for cancer patients and survivors. Cross-cutting themes include research and innovation, digital and personalised medicine, and action to reduce cancer inequalities across the EU. A particular focus will be on childhood cancers. The plan consists of 10 flagship initiatives and 32 supporting actions, to be rolled out over the coming years. Implementation will be monitored by means of a roadmap and progress indicators, and the Commission will establish an EU cancer plan implementation group. With a €4 billion budget, the plan will make use of all available funding instruments, including the new EU4Health programme, Horizon Europe, and the Digital Europe programme. EU institutional actors and public and private stakeholders have widely commented on Europe's Beating Cancer plan. While non-governmental organisations and industry associations broadly welcome the plan and its ambition, some have criticised specific elements. The European Parliament's Special Committee on Cancer is working on an own-initiative report that will be Parliament's contribution to Europe's Beating Cancer plan. Health and Food Safety Commissioner Stella Kyriakides has stressed that Parliament and its special committee has played an important role in shaping the plan, and will also be instrumental during its implementation.

EU4Health programme 2021-2027

03-03-2021

On 28 May 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on the establishment of a programme for the Union's action in the field of health for the 2021-2027 period (EU4Health programme). Interinstitutional negotiations between the European Parliament and the Council were concluded on 14 December 2020 with a provisional agreement on the programme, including a budget of €5.1 billion. Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety endorsed the final compromise ...

On 28 May 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on the establishment of a programme for the Union's action in the field of health for the 2021-2027 period (EU4Health programme). Interinstitutional negotiations between the European Parliament and the Council were concluded on 14 December 2020 with a provisional agreement on the programme, including a budget of €5.1 billion. Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety endorsed the final compromise on 15 January 2021. Parliament's first-reading vote is expected during the March I plenary session.

Covid-19 vaccination campaigns: The public dimension

29-01-2021

The arrival of the Covid-19 vaccines marks a turning point in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. For European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, vaccination is about self protection and solidarity. For many people, it is also about trust. Some are hesitant to get vaccinated, while others are against vaccination on principle. According to estimates, coverage of at least 60 % to 75 % is needed to establish population immunity through vaccination. Polls show that sizeable numbers of ...

The arrival of the Covid-19 vaccines marks a turning point in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. For European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, vaccination is about self protection and solidarity. For many people, it is also about trust. Some are hesitant to get vaccinated, while others are against vaccination on principle. According to estimates, coverage of at least 60 % to 75 % is needed to establish population immunity through vaccination. Polls show that sizeable numbers of people in the EU are hesitant − or even opposed − to vaccination in general. As regards Covid-19 vaccination, surveys suggest that Europeans are among the most sceptical in the world. According to the World Health Organization, vaccine hesitancy is complex and context-specific, varying across time, place and vaccine. Science has identified several behavioural factors underpinning vaccine uptake. Vaccine scepticism can also be linked to trust in government and is associated with certain political mindsets. Many commentators agree that Covid-19 vaccine communication is a collective endeavour that should ideally involve institutional actors, healthcare professionals, scientists, journalists and people with standing in communities. There is a need to engage with the wider public, in particular with groups that have a low level of trust in scientists and are less favourable to vaccines. It is considered key to move towards an open dialogue that respects people's emotions, and to understand the individual values behind doubters' fears. Reaching diverse populations is deemed instrumental, as is involving political and community leaders in communication strategies. The December 2020 European Council conclusions stressed the importance of providing clear factual information on Covid-19 vaccines and countering disinformation. The European Commission is set to roll out a two-phase vaccine communication campaign complementing the Member States' efforts. The European Parliament has insisted on the need to counter the spread of unreliable, misleading and unscientific information on vaccination, and Members have repeatedly called for more transparency on the EU advance purchase agreements with vaccine developers.

Coronavirus testing: Contributing to efforts to stem the second wave

07-12-2020

The coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic remains a major threat to public health in the European Union (EU). Testing is considered an essential aspect of the response to the pandemic. There are different types of coronavirus tests, each having its own merits and limitations. The timing of tests is also critical. Among the tests that detect current infection, (rapid) antigen tests have recently come to the fore. In view of a resurgence of coronavirus cases, the European Commission adopted on 28 October ...

The coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic remains a major threat to public health in the European Union (EU). Testing is considered an essential aspect of the response to the pandemic. There are different types of coronavirus tests, each having its own merits and limitations. The timing of tests is also critical. Among the tests that detect current infection, (rapid) antigen tests have recently come to the fore. In view of a resurgence of coronavirus cases, the European Commission adopted on 28 October 2020 a recommendation for a common EU testing approach for Covid-19. It addresses key points linked to testing capacities and resources, as well as rapid antigen tests. This was followed on 18 November by a recommendation on the use of rapid antigen tests for the diagnosis of Covid-19, which provides guidance on how to select rapid antigen tests, when they are appropriate and who should perform them. It also calls for validation and mutual recognition of tests and their results. EU and international public health bodies, including the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and the World Health Organization, have given testing recommendations and outlined strategies and objectives. Several Member States have started to use rapid antigen tests in practice. Testing policies range from testing only people who both have symptoms and also meet specific criteria, to testing anyone with symptoms, to open public testing, including asymptomatic people. In a September 2020 resolution, the European Parliament called for the adoption and implementation of a common testing strategy under which test results would be recognised in all Member States. Since the outbreak of the pandemic, coronavirus testing has rapidly evolved and will continue to play an important role. New methods are emerging, including 'out of the box' options.

Europe's Beating Cancer plan - Pre-legislative synthesis of national, regional and local positions on the European Commission proposal

26-11-2020

This briefing forms part of an EPRS series offering syntheses of the pre-legislative state of play and consultation on key European Commission priorities during the current five-year term. It summarises the state of affairs in the relevant policy field, examines how the existing policy is working on the ground, and, where possible, identifies best practice and ideas for the future on the part of governmental organisations at all levels of European system of multilevel governance. EPRS analysis of ...

This briefing forms part of an EPRS series offering syntheses of the pre-legislative state of play and consultation on key European Commission priorities during the current five-year term. It summarises the state of affairs in the relevant policy field, examines how the existing policy is working on the ground, and, where possible, identifies best practice and ideas for the future on the part of governmental organisations at all levels of European system of multilevel governance. EPRS analysis of the positions of partner organisations at European, national, regional and local levels suggests that they would like the following main considerations to be reflected in discussion of the forthcoming Europe's Beating Cancer plan: * Submissions from all four levels of governance highlight the EU's key role in prevention, including as regards cancer-causing environmental factors and tobacco consumption. Input obtained refers to the active role Europe's local and regional actors can play in putting prevention into practice. * European and national levels point to predictive diagnostic tools and novel approaches in cancer medicine. Regional actors advocate for closer cooperation between primary care and hospital care in early diagnosis. Both the regional and local levels would like the EU to help improve screening. * Equitable access to cancer care is featured across all levels. National input raises the issue of availability and affordability of medicines. The local level underscores the merits of ambulatory care, and sees a role for the EU in the creation of local coordination platforms for doctors and patients. * The European level addresses cancer after-care in the local community and cancer survivorship and rehabilitation. Both the regional and local levels recommend fostering personalised care and follow-up for cancer patients. * European and national input stresses the importance of EU-wide cancer research cooperation, information sharing and better deployment of (big) data. Attention is drawn to improving information, communication, education and awareness-raising for both the wider public and healthcare professionals, with regional input encouraging the development of new technologies to ease doctor-patient communication. * All levels would like Europe's Beating Cancer plan to address health inequalities in cancer. EU-level action is considered key to help reduce socioeconomic and geographical disparities, and tackle differences in cancer prevalence and survival rates. A 'health in all policies' approach is supported.

The EU's new health programme: EU4Health

05-11-2020

On 28 May 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on the establishment of a programme for the Union's action in the field of health for the 2021-2027 period (EU4Health programme). It was announced as part of the Next Generation EU recovery instrument, aimed at countering the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. The July European Council meeting reduced the programme's budget from the initially proposed €9.4 billion to €1.7 billion. In its report, European Parliament's Committee ...

On 28 May 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on the establishment of a programme for the Union's action in the field of health for the 2021-2027 period (EU4Health programme). It was announced as part of the Next Generation EU recovery instrument, aimed at countering the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. The July European Council meeting reduced the programme's budget from the initially proposed €9.4 billion to €1.7 billion. In its report, European Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety proposes, inter alia, to restore EU4Health's initial budget. Parliament is expected to vote on the report during the November I plenary session. This would open the way for trilogue negotiations.

Coronavirus vaccines strategy

29-09-2020

On 17 June 2020, the European Commission presented a strategy to accelerate the development, manufacturing and deployment of vaccines against the coronavirus disease (Covid-19). The strategy aims to secure high quality, safe, effective and affordable Covid-19 vaccines for all in the EU within 12-18 months, if not earlier. To this end, the Commission has started to enter into advance purchase agreements with vaccine producers on behalf of the EU Member States. With the Coronavirus Global Response ...

On 17 June 2020, the European Commission presented a strategy to accelerate the development, manufacturing and deployment of vaccines against the coronavirus disease (Covid-19). The strategy aims to secure high quality, safe, effective and affordable Covid-19 vaccines for all in the EU within 12-18 months, if not earlier. To this end, the Commission has started to enter into advance purchase agreements with vaccine producers on behalf of the EU Member States. With the Coronavirus Global Response initiative and its participation in the COVAX facility, the EU is also positioning itself as a leader of global solidarity effort to speed up universal access to vaccines.

Būsimi renginiai

22-04-2021
Joint FEMM-EMPL Public Hearing on Pay Transparency
Klausymas -
FEMM EMPL
22-04-2021
The need for better EU policies for health (online event)
Seminaras -
STOA
23-04-2021
EPRS' Fifth Annual Forum on Comparative Law
Kitas renginys -
EPRS

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