10

Rezultatas(-ai)

Žodis(-iai)
Publikacijos rūšis
Politikos sritis
Raktinis žodis
Datą

Regulating facial recognition in the EU

15-09-2021

The European Union is considering regulating facial recognition in the proposed artificial intelligence act, currently under discussion. This EPRS publication explains the state of play and further highlights the concerns raised by the use and the potential impacts on people's fundamental rights of facial recognition technologies. Against this background, the paper explores the current EU legal framework applicable to facial recognition and examines the recent proposals for regulating facial recognition ...

The European Union is considering regulating facial recognition in the proposed artificial intelligence act, currently under discussion. This EPRS publication explains the state of play and further highlights the concerns raised by the use and the potential impacts on people's fundamental rights of facial recognition technologies. Against this background, the paper explores the current EU legal framework applicable to facial recognition and examines the recent proposals for regulating facial recognition technologies at EU level in depth.

Internet access as a fundamental right: Exploring aspects of connectivity

15-07-2021

With digital technologies permeating all areas of life, and online access becoming a prerequisite for the exercise of a number of fundamental rights, the internet plays a crucial role for the individual, during but also looking beyond the coronavirus pandemic. As calls for a fundamental right to internet access resurface, it would come as no surprise if legislators engaged further with the topic and assessed policy and legislative options. Against this backdrop, the present analysis i) identifies ...

With digital technologies permeating all areas of life, and online access becoming a prerequisite for the exercise of a number of fundamental rights, the internet plays a crucial role for the individual, during but also looking beyond the coronavirus pandemic. As calls for a fundamental right to internet access resurface, it would come as no surprise if legislators engaged further with the topic and assessed policy and legislative options. Against this backdrop, the present analysis i) identifies design and operating parameters for a potential fundamental right to internet access, ii) sets out a design option, iii) reviews benefits and drawbacks of its potential recognition and iv) provides a brief overview of EU legislation and actions that may interact with such a novel right.

Squaring privacy rules with measures to combat child sexual abuse online

01-07-2021

With internet-based communications services, such as webmail, messaging services and internet telephony, becoming subject to the strict confidentiality requirements of the e-Privacy Directive, providers' deployments of specific technologies to detect, report and remove child sexual abuse material online now appear unlawful. To accommodate such practices, the European Commission proposed a regulation that would temporarily exempt them from certain provisions of the e-Privacy Directive, without, however ...

With internet-based communications services, such as webmail, messaging services and internet telephony, becoming subject to the strict confidentiality requirements of the e-Privacy Directive, providers' deployments of specific technologies to detect, report and remove child sexual abuse material online now appear unlawful. To accommodate such practices, the European Commission proposed a regulation that would temporarily exempt them from certain provisions of the e-Privacy Directive, without, however, stipulating the legality of these practices with respect to the wider EU data protection framework. During its July plenary session, the European Parliament is due to vote at first reading on the final text resulting from interinstitutional negotiations.

Data Governance Act

17-06-2021

Data is a key pillar of the European digital economy. To unlock its potential, the European Commission aims to build a market for personal and non-personal data that fully respects European rules and values. While the volume of data is expected to increase dramatically in the coming years, data re-use is hampered by low trust in data-sharing, conflicting economic incentives and technological obstacles. As the first of a set of measures announced in the European strategy for data, the Commission put ...

Data is a key pillar of the European digital economy. To unlock its potential, the European Commission aims to build a market for personal and non-personal data that fully respects European rules and values. While the volume of data is expected to increase dramatically in the coming years, data re-use is hampered by low trust in data-sharing, conflicting economic incentives and technological obstacles. As the first of a set of measures announced in the European strategy for data, the Commission put forward its proposed data governance act on 25 November 2020. It aims at facilitating (largely) voluntary data sharing across the EU and between sectors by strengthening mechanisms that increase data availability and foster trust in intermediaries. It establishes three principle re-use mechanisms and a horizontal coordination and steering board. While there seems to be considerable support for data governance rules, the appropriate approach remains fundamentally disputed. Issues have been raised concerning, for instance, the ineffectiveness of labelling and registration regimes to foster trust and data re-use, the uncertain interplay with other legislative acts, the onerous rules on international data transfers and the vulnerability of certain mechanisms to commercial exploitation. The co-legislators, the European Parliament and Council, are in the process of assessing whether the Commission's proposal presents an adequate response to the challenges identified and are working towards defining their respective positions.

International transfers of personal data

12-05-2021

In its July 2020 Schrems II ruling, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) invalidated the European Commission's US adequacy decision on account of insufficient US data protection standards. Drawing from the judgment, personal data may – in principle – only be transferred to a third country outside the EU/European Economic Area if the third country ensures an 'essentially equivalent' level of data protection to that of the EU, or if supplementary measures are deployed to compensate for ...

In its July 2020 Schrems II ruling, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) invalidated the European Commission's US adequacy decision on account of insufficient US data protection standards. Drawing from the judgment, personal data may – in principle – only be transferred to a third country outside the EU/European Economic Area if the third country ensures an 'essentially equivalent' level of data protection to that of the EU, or if supplementary measures are deployed to compensate for the lacunae in protection. With the United Kingdom (UK) becoming a third country within the meaning of EU data protection law, the convenient and cost-effective continuation of EU–UK data flows will depend on the adoption of the (already controversial) draft adequacy decisions concerning the UK. During its May plenary session, Parliament is due to debate resolutions on, respectively, the Schrems II ruling, and on UK data adequacy, i.e. the country's level of data protection.

EU-UK private-sector data flows after Brexit: Settling on adequacy

09-04-2021

EU-UK data flows – the lifelines of our shared digital trade – have come under pressure following the UK's withdrawal from the EU. To take regulatory and business decisions, a clear understanding of the state of play and future prospects for EU-UK transfers of personal data is indispensable. This EPRS in-depth analysis reviews and assesses trade dealings, adequacy challenges and transfer instruments under the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

EU-UK data flows – the lifelines of our shared digital trade – have come under pressure following the UK's withdrawal from the EU. To take regulatory and business decisions, a clear understanding of the state of play and future prospects for EU-UK transfers of personal data is indispensable. This EPRS in-depth analysis reviews and assesses trade dealings, adequacy challenges and transfer instruments under the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

A European strategy for data

24-03-2021

Data represents the driving force of the European digital transformation. In order to harness the potential of the data economy, the European Commission aims to build a market for personal and non-personal data that fully respects European rules and values. During its March II plenary session, Parliament is due to debate data issues, before voting on an own-initiative report concerning a European strategy for data and a resolution on the European Commission’s evaluation of the General Data Protection ...

Data represents the driving force of the European digital transformation. In order to harness the potential of the data economy, the European Commission aims to build a market for personal and non-personal data that fully respects European rules and values. During its March II plenary session, Parliament is due to debate data issues, before voting on an own-initiative report concerning a European strategy for data and a resolution on the European Commission’s evaluation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Complementary executive capacity

15-02-2021

Against the backdrop of new and unprecedented crises and challenges, the advantages of coordinated approaches and effective cross-border responses are all the more evident, and gaining support among Europeans, as shown by recent Eurobarometer surveys. In this context, EU complementary executive capacity could be a way of meeting citizens' expectations, through complementing, without replacing, the executive capacities of the Member States. The concept of complementary EU executive capacity dovetails ...

Against the backdrop of new and unprecedented crises and challenges, the advantages of coordinated approaches and effective cross-border responses are all the more evident, and gaining support among Europeans, as shown by recent Eurobarometer surveys. In this context, EU complementary executive capacity could be a way of meeting citizens' expectations, through complementing, without replacing, the executive capacities of the Member States. The concept of complementary EU executive capacity dovetails naturally with the ongoing transformation of the EU from a legislative union to a hybrid (legislative–executive) union, as it becomes more involved in implementing law rather than purely enacting it. Essentially, the notion repackages pre-existing administrative practices in a way that facilitates their operationalisation, draws attention to new areas of potential EU executive involvement, and presents a tool for communication with citizens that can be understood.

EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement: An analytical overview

02-02-2021

This EPRS publication seeks to provide an analytical overview of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) between the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), which was agreed between the two parties on 24 December and signed by them on 30 December 2020, and has been provisionally applied since 1 January 2021. The European Parliament is currently considering the Agreement with a view to voting on giving its consent to conclusion by the Council on behalf of the Union. The paper analyses many ...

This EPRS publication seeks to provide an analytical overview of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) between the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), which was agreed between the two parties on 24 December and signed by them on 30 December 2020, and has been provisionally applied since 1 January 2021. The European Parliament is currently considering the Agreement with a view to voting on giving its consent to conclusion by the Council on behalf of the Union. The paper analyses many of the areas covered in the agreement, including the institutional framework and arrangements for dispute settlement, trade in goods, services and investment, digital trade, energy, the level playing field, transport, social security coordination and visas for short-term visits, fisheries, law enforcement and judicial coordination in criminal matters, and participation in Union programmes. It looks at the main provisions of the Agreement in each area, setting them in context, and also gives an overview of the two parties' published negotiating positions in the respective areas.

The CJEU judgment in the Schrems II case

15-09-2020

In its July 2020 Schrems II judgment, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) declared the European Commission’s Privacy Shield Decision invalid on account of invasive US surveillance programmes, thereby making transfers of personal data on the basis of the Privacy Shield Decision illegal. Furthermore, the Court stipulated stricter requirements for the transfer of personal data based on standard contract clauses (SCCs). Data controllers or processors that intend to transfer data based on ...

In its July 2020 Schrems II judgment, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) declared the European Commission’s Privacy Shield Decision invalid on account of invasive US surveillance programmes, thereby making transfers of personal data on the basis of the Privacy Shield Decision illegal. Furthermore, the Court stipulated stricter requirements for the transfer of personal data based on standard contract clauses (SCCs). Data controllers or processors that intend to transfer data based on SCCs must ensure that the data subject is granted a level of protection essentially equivalent to that guaranteed by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights (CFR) – if necessary with additional measures to compensate for lacunae in protection of third-country legal systems. Failing that, operators must suspend the transfer of personal data outside the EU.

Būsimi renginiai

27-09-2021
Turning the tide on cancer: the national parliaments' view on Europe's Cancer Plan
Kitas renginys -
BECA
27-09-2021
US trade policy
Klausymas -
INTA
27-09-2021
Consumer protection and automated decision-making tools in a modern economy
Klausymas -
IMCO

Partneriai