15

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Climate action in Sweden: Latest state of play

27-10-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Sweden submitted its NECP in January 2020. A high proportion of Swedes (76%) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Sweden accounts for 1.4 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slightly faster pace ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Sweden submitted its NECP in January 2020. A high proportion of Swedes (76%) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Sweden accounts for 1.4 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slightly faster pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of Sweden's economy is the lowest in the Union and continues to decrease faster than the EU-wide average. Sweden's transport sector has the highest share of total emissions, but reduced its levels by over 23 % from 2005 to 2019. The sector with the greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 56.4 % – was waste management. Under the Effort-sharing Decision (2013 2020) Sweden needs to reduce its emissions in sectors not included in the EU emissions trading system by 17 % compared with 2005 levels. The 2030 target under the Effort-sharing Regulation (2021-2030) is a 40 % reduction. The country is well placed to achieve both the 2020 and 2030 targets. The country's share of renewable energy sources was 56.4 % in 2019 and is predicted to reach 65 % by 2030, mainly through wind farms and solar power.

Climate action in Hungary: Latest state of play

11-10-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Hungary submitted its NECP in December 2019. A high proportion of Hungarians (60 %) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Hungary accounts for 1.7 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Hungary submitted its NECP in December 2019. A high proportion of Hungarians (60 %) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Hungary accounts for 1.7 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Hungarian economy decreased by 35 % between 2005 and 2019, at a faster rate than the EU-27 average. Transport emissions increased by just over 19 % in the 2005-2019 period in Hungary, bringing their share of total emissions up to over 22 %. Reductions are expected as the country proceeds with its electromobility measures. The greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 37.5 % – was made by the energy industries sector. Under the Effort-sharing Decision for the 2013 2020 period, Hungary was allowed to increase its emissions in sectors not included in the EU's emissions trading system by 10 %, compared with 2005 levels, and is on track to achieving that target. Under the Effort-sharing Regulation (2021-2030) Hungary must reduce its emissions by 7 % compared with 2005. The share of renewable energy sources in Hungary reached 12.6 % in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 21 % share is focused mainly on changes to the transport and heating and cooling sectors, where changes to the existing district heating networks are expected.

Climate action in Slovenia: Latest state of play

11-10-2021

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Slovenia submitted its NECP in February 2020. More than half (52 %) of Slovenians expect national governments to tackle climate change. Slovenia accounts for 0.5 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than ...

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Slovenia submitted its NECP in February 2020. More than half (52 %) of Slovenians expect national governments to tackle climate change. Slovenia accounts for 0.5 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Slovenian economy decreased by 36 % between 2005 and 2019, a higher rate than the EU average. Energy industry emissions fell by 29.5 % in the 2005-2019 period in the country. Measures, such as coal phase-out, are expected to further decrease these emissions. The sector with the greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 45.2 % – was 'other emissions' (buildings and tertiary sector). Under the Effort-sharing Decision (2013 2020), Slovenia was allowed to increase emissions in sectors not included in the EU emissions trading system by 4 %, compared with 2005 levels, and is on track to achieve this target. The Effort-sharing Regulation (2021-2030) requires Slovenia to reduce these emissions by 15 %. The share of renewable energy sources in the country reached 22 % in 2019. For 2030 the target is 27 %, to be reached mainly through solar and hydro power, and through the use of wood biomass.

Cities in a globalised world: Exploring trends and the effect on urban resilience

07-10-2021

Cities are inevitably affected by shocks and disruptions, the pandemic being a case in point. The extent of the impact however depends on cities' preparedness and capacity to adapt. By thinking ahead, cities can explore emerging or plausible developments in order to anticipate them and contain potential disruption. Drawing on a report prepared by the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS), this EPRS paper explores the impact on and implications for cities of current global trends, such ...

Cities are inevitably affected by shocks and disruptions, the pandemic being a case in point. The extent of the impact however depends on cities' preparedness and capacity to adapt. By thinking ahead, cities can explore emerging or plausible developments in order to anticipate them and contain potential disruption. Drawing on a report prepared by the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS), this EPRS paper explores the impact on and implications for cities of current global trends, such as climate change, population growth, urbanisation, economic growth, increasing energy demand, higher connectivity and a changing world order, that will have direct consequences for the future of cities and their inhabitants.

Climate action in Latvia: Latest state of play

03-09-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) to cover the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Latvia submitted its NECP in November 2019. More than half (56 %) of Latvians expect national governments to tackle climate change. Latvia accounts for 0.3 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and its emissions increased between 2005 and 2019, in contrast ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) to cover the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Latvia submitted its NECP in November 2019. More than half (56 %) of Latvians expect national governments to tackle climate change. Latvia accounts for 0.3 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and its emissions increased between 2005 and 2019, in contrast to the average EU trend. The carbon intensity of Latvia's economy is higher than the EU average, but has declined since 2005. Emissions from the transport sector increased by 6.9 % between 2005 and 2019, accounting for 27.8 % of total emissions. The manufacturing industries and construction sector showed the biggest percentage reduction (42 %) in emissions over the period. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Latvia was allowed to increase its emissions by 17 % by 2020, compared with 2005, and in 2019 was on track to achieving the target. Latvia achieved a 41 % share of renewable energy sources in 2019 and aims to reach 50 % by 2030. The European Commission regards this ambition as adequate, but warns of possible hurdles.

Climate action in Cyprus: Latest state of play

03-09-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Cyprus submitted its NECP in January 2020. A high proportion of Cypriots (70 %) expect national governments to tackle climate. Cyprus accounts for 0.26 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Cyprus submitted its NECP in January 2020. A high proportion of Cypriots (70 %) expect national governments to tackle climate. Cyprus accounts for 0.26 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Cypriot economy decreased by close to 25 % between 2005 and 2019, at a rate slower than the EU average. Energy industry emissions fell by 3.7 % in the 2005 to 2019 period in Cyprus. Further emissions reductions are expected as the country shifts its electricity production from heavy fuel oil to natural gas by the end of 2021. Transport and industrial processes and product use were the sectors with the smallest reductions. Under the Effort-sharing Decision for the 2013 2020 period, Cyprus needed to reduce its emissions in sectors not included in the EU's emission trading system by 5 %, compared with 2005 levels. For the Effort-sharing Regulation period (2021-2030) the target is set at -21 % compared with 2005 levels. The share of renewable energy in Cyprus reached 13.8 % in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 22.9 % share is focused on changes in the heating and cooling, and electricity sectors.

Climate action in Portugal: Latest state of play

03-09-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Portugal submitted its NECP in December 2019. More than half (57%) of Portuguese people expect national governments to tackle climate change. Portugal generates 1.8 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2019, the carbon intensity of Portugal's ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Portugal submitted its NECP in December 2019. More than half (57%) of Portuguese people expect national governments to tackle climate change. Portugal generates 1.8 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2019, the carbon intensity of Portugal's economy was 22 % above the EU average, and fell at a slightly slower pace than the EU average over the 2005-2019 period. The transport sector reduced its emissions by 10.3 % between 2005 and 2019 and is the sector with the highest emissions, accounting for 26 % of Portuguese emissions in 2019. Energy sector emissions, accounting for 19 % of total emissions in 2019, fell by 50 % between 2005 and 2019 – the largest reduction in emissions of all sectors. Under EU effort-sharing legislation for the 2013-2020 period, Portugal was allowed to increase its non-ETS GHG emissions by 1 %, compared with 2005, and never surpassed its allocated emissions The share of renewable energy sources in 2019 was 30.6 %. The country's 2030 target of a 47 % share is one of the highest in the EU, with a renewable energy in electricity target of 80 % by 2030.

Climate action in the Netherlands: Latest state of play

30-08-2021

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. The Netherlands submitted its NECP in November 2019. A high proportion of Dutch people (73 %) expect national governments to tackle climate. The Netherlands accounts for 5.2 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower ...

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. The Netherlands submitted its NECP in November 2019. A high proportion of Dutch people (73 %) expect national governments to tackle climate. The Netherlands accounts for 5.2 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Dutch economy decreased by 29 % between 2005 and 2019, a slower rate than the EU-wide average. Energy industry emissions fell by 15 % in the 2005-2019 period in the country. Measures such as the introduction of carbon pricing, are expected to further decrease these emissions. The sector with the greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 55 % – was waste management. Under the Effort-sharing Decision (2013 2020) and Effort-sharing Regulation (2021-2030), the Netherlands needs to reduce its emissions in sectors not included in the EU emissions trading system by 16 % and 36 % respectively, compared with 2005 levels. The share of renewable energy sources in the country reached 8.8 % in 2019, and for 2030 the target is 27 %, to be reached mainly through solar power and offshore and onshore wind farms.

Climate action in Greece: Latest state of play

24-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Greece submitted its NECP in December 2019. Greece accounts for 2.4 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a higher pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Greek economy decreased by 23 % from ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Greece submitted its NECP in December 2019. Greece accounts for 2.4 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a higher pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Greek economy decreased by 23 % from 2005 to 2019, at a slower rate than the EU-27 average. Energy industry emissions fell by almost 45 % in the 2005-2019 period in Greece, reducing their share of total emissions by 14 %. Further reductions are expected as the country proceeds with phasing out lignite-fired power plants. The sector that showed the greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 54 % – was manufacturing industries and construction. Transport and agriculture were the sectors with the lowest reductions. Under the Effort-sharing Decision for the 2013 2020 period, Greece needs to reduce its emissions in sectors not included in the EU's emission trading system by 4 %, compared with 2005 levels, and is on track to achieving it. The share of renewable energy sources in Greece reached 19.7 % in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 35 % share is focused mainly on changes to the transport and heating and cooling sectors. This briefing is one in a series which will cover all EU Member States.

Climate action in Germany: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. Germany submitted its NECP in June 2020. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Germany accounts for 24 % of net EU-27 emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Since 2005, emissions have steadily decreased, following the average trend in the Union. The carbon intensity of the German economy is falling ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. Germany submitted its NECP in June 2020. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Germany accounts for 24 % of net EU-27 emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Since 2005, emissions have steadily decreased, following the average trend in the Union. The carbon intensity of the German economy is falling, also mirroring the EU pattern. Energy industries are the largest source of emissions, responsible for 29 % of total emissions. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, by 2020 Germany was required to reduce its emissions by 14 % compared with 2005. However, the country exceeded its allocated emissions from 2016 to 2019. Germany's current 2030 target under the Effort-sharing Regulation (ESR) is to reduce emissions by 38 % from 2005 levels. According to the Commission's assessment of Germany's NECP, with the new proposed measures the reduction will fall short of the target by 3 percentage points. In 2019, renewable energy sources accounted for 17.4 % of gross final consumption, just 0.6 percentage points short of the target set for 2020. Following a court ruling on 24 March 2021, which found that the Climate Change Act was not aligned with fundamental rights, the German government announced its intention to strengthen its commitment, aiming to achieve net-zero emissions by 2045. This briefing is one in a series which will cover all EU Member States.

Būsimi renginiai

28-10-2021
Workshop "Envisioning International Justice: what role for the ICC?"
Seminaras -
DROI
28-10-2021
Dual quality of goods in the Single Market
Klausymas -
IMCO
28-10-2021
Public hearing on the "Luxletters revelations"
Klausymas -
FISC

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