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The future of regional airports: Challenges and opportunities

26-02-2021

Regional airports are an important part of the aviation system in the European Union (EU). They are engines of socio-economic development and improve accessibility to certain locations, in particular those that are remote or not well served by other forms of transportation. They also have a vital role in terms of economic and social cohesion, stimulating tourism and employment, as well as facilitating access to essential services. In addition, they can help to reduce congestion at major hub airports ...

Regional airports are an important part of the aviation system in the European Union (EU). They are engines of socio-economic development and improve accessibility to certain locations, in particular those that are remote or not well served by other forms of transportation. They also have a vital role in terms of economic and social cohesion, stimulating tourism and employment, as well as facilitating access to essential services. In addition, they can help to reduce congestion at major hub airports. The Covid 19 pandemic has hit regional airports hard, especially those more dependent on passenger traffic, which has been more severely hit than cargo traffic. The situation is so difficult that without government support, many regional airports, which serve local communities, face the risk of insolvency. Meanwhile, the pandemic is putting airports under pressure to become more digital. Moreover, a greater focus on tackling climate change is driving various projects to make airports more sustainable. The recovery from the crisis is likely to take several years. It will depend on several factors, such as the duration and magnitude of the crisis, pace of vaccination and consumer confidence. The speed with which the economy recovers will also affect how long the recovery of air travel will take. All this requires support. The EU has taken steps to ensure that Member States can make full use of the flexibility allowed under State aid rules, to provide regional airports with support to overcome this unprecedented crisis. Since March 2020, the European Commission has approved numerous State aid schemes from which regional airports can benefit. The EU can also support airports through its Recovery and Resilience Facility, which aims at making Europe more sustainable, resilient and better prepared for the challenges and opportunities of the green and digital transitions.

Air services: Revision of Regulation (EC) No 1008/2008

15-12-2020

New rules regulating the air services are expected by the end of year. The basic legal act organising the internal EU aviation market, namely Regulation (EC) No 1008/2008, is expected to be revised by the European Commission, after being evaluated in 2019.

New rules regulating the air services are expected by the end of year. The basic legal act organising the internal EU aviation market, namely Regulation (EC) No 1008/2008, is expected to be revised by the European Commission, after being evaluated in 2019.

Civil and military drones: Navigating a disruptive and dynamic technological ecosystem

08-10-2019

Often labelled as one of today's main disruptive technologies, drones have indeed earned this label by prompting a fundamental rethinking of business models, existing laws, safety and security standards, the future of transport, and modern warfare. The European Union (EU) recognises the opportunities that drones offer and sees them as opening a new chapter in the history of aerospace. The EU aviation strategy provides guidance for exploring new and emerging technologies, and encourages the integration ...

Often labelled as one of today's main disruptive technologies, drones have indeed earned this label by prompting a fundamental rethinking of business models, existing laws, safety and security standards, the future of transport, and modern warfare. The European Union (EU) recognises the opportunities that drones offer and sees them as opening a new chapter in the history of aerospace. The EU aviation strategy provides guidance for exploring new and emerging technologies, and encourages the integration of drones into business and society so as to maintain a competitive EU aviation industry. Ranging from insect-sized to several tonnes in weight, drones are extremely versatile and can perform a very large variety of functions, from filming to farming, and from medical aid to search and rescue operations. Among the advantages of civil and military drones are their relative low cost, reach, greater work productivity and capacity to reduce risk to human life. These features have led to their mass commercialisation and integration into military planning. Regulatory and oversight challenges remain, however, particularly regarding dual-use drones – civil drones that can be easily turned into armed drones or weaponised for criminal purposes. At EU level, the European Commission has been empowered to regulate civil drones and the European Aviation Safety Agency to assist with ensuring a harmonised regulatory framework for safe drone operations. The latest EU legislation has achieved the highest ever safety standards for drones. Another challenge remaining for regulators, officials and manufacturers alike is the need to build the trust of citizens and consumers. Given that drones have been in the public eye more often for their misuse than their accomplishments, transparency and effective communication are imperative to prepare citizens for the upcoming drone age.

New civil aviation safety rules

15-10-2018

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules ...

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules. Two years later, the European Parliament and the Council reached a provisional agreement on the new rules and the rules have been in force since 11 September 2018. The reform includes the first-ever EU rules for civil drones, extends the EASA's mandate and provides for using existing resources more efficiently. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 620.199, 28 March 2018.

New civil aviation safety rules

28-03-2018

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules ...

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules. Two years later, the European Parliament and the Council reached a provisional agreement on the new rules. The reform includes the first-ever EU rules for civil drones, extends the EASA's mandate and provides for using existing resources more efficiently. The provisional agreement now needs to be confirmed by Parliament in plenary. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 595.877, 12 January 2017.

Oro transportas. Rinkos taisyklės

01-07-2017

Aviacijos bendrosios rinkos sukūrimas praeito amžiaus 10-ojo dešimtmečio pabaigoje iš esmės pakeitė oro transporto pramonę ir per pastaruosius dvidešimt metų labai prisidėjo prie spartaus oro transporto augimo Europoje.

Aviacijos bendrosios rinkos sukūrimas praeito amžiaus 10-ojo dešimtmečio pabaigoje iš esmės pakeitė oro transporto pramonę ir per pastaruosius dvidešimt metų labai prisidėjo prie spartaus oro transporto augimo Europoje.

New civil aviation safety rules

12-01-2017

Despite some recent high-profile disasters, flying remains one of the safest forms of transport and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. In addition, new technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European ...

Despite some recent high-profile disasters, flying remains one of the safest forms of transport and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. In addition, new technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to replace the current Regulation on civil aviation safety and the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The new proposal would introduce risk- and performance-based rules, close some safety gaps and interlinks safety more closely with other domains such as security and the environment. It proposes to strengthen EASA's role and take several measures to use existing resources more efficiently (e.g. sharing aviation inspectors). It also introduces essential requirements for drones. In November 2016, the European Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism generally backed the updated rules, in particular the idea of regulating drones at EU level. The report constitutes Parliament’s position for negotiations with the Council, which adopted its general approach for the negotiations with the Parliament on 1 December 2016. This updates an earlier edition, of January 2016: PE 573.933. "A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html"

The International Civil Aviation Organization

24-10-2016

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a specialised agency of the United Nations, established in 1944 to manage the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the Chicago Convention). This is an update of an earlier edition of this 'at a glance' note, from May 2016.

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a specialised agency of the United Nations, established in 1944 to manage the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the Chicago Convention). This is an update of an earlier edition of this 'at a glance' note, from May 2016.

Research for TRAN Committee - Prospects for “Remote” En-Route Air Traffic Services

15-08-2016

Remote tower services, where aircraft at an airport are remote-controlled from a separate location, have been introduced to some airports and are being tested at several others. By reviewing the current and emerging technologies, considering some of the risks associated with these technologies and evaluating the contribution of the NextGen and SESAR programmes, this paper aims to assess the feasibility of also providing “remote” en-route Air Traffic Services in Europe.

Remote tower services, where aircraft at an airport are remote-controlled from a separate location, have been introduced to some airports and are being tested at several others. By reviewing the current and emerging technologies, considering some of the risks associated with these technologies and evaluating the contribution of the NextGen and SESAR programmes, this paper aims to assess the feasibility of also providing “remote” en-route Air Traffic Services in Europe.

Išorės autorius

Stephen Wainwright and Rosie Offord, Mark Scott (Steer Davies Gleave)

Airports in the EU: Challenges ahead

09-06-2016

With soaring passenger traffic and an increasing number of destinations and connections, air transport in the EU has been undergoing profound change in recent decades, impacting on airports as key players in the aviation value chain and civil aviation infrastructure. EU airports, which differ significantly in size and role, had to adapt following the liberalisation of the internal market for aviation; they now have commercial objectives and compete to attract and retain traffic. This analysis provides ...

With soaring passenger traffic and an increasing number of destinations and connections, air transport in the EU has been undergoing profound change in recent decades, impacting on airports as key players in the aviation value chain and civil aviation infrastructure. EU airports, which differ significantly in size and role, had to adapt following the liberalisation of the internal market for aviation; they now have commercial objectives and compete to attract and retain traffic. This analysis provides a comprehensive overview of the challenges confronting EU airports, beginning with an overview of historical developments up to today, and focusing in particular on connectivity issues, the economics of airports, and future trends. The second part looks at the measures taken by the EU to tackle the challenges facing airports, including the Commission's recent Aviation Strategy for Europe.

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