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Rail passengers' rights and obligations in the EU

09-04-2021

In 2007, the EU established a set of basic rights for rail passengers, which became applicable at the end of 2009. These rights provide for all passengers, including those with reduced mobility, a harmonised minimum level of protection, information and assistance. Reports have concluded that the implementation of these rights, although relatively smooth, is not done uniformly across the EU. Moreover, other shortcomings have prevented these rights from being used to their full potential. In September ...

In 2007, the EU established a set of basic rights for rail passengers, which became applicable at the end of 2009. These rights provide for all passengers, including those with reduced mobility, a harmonised minimum level of protection, information and assistance. Reports have concluded that the implementation of these rights, although relatively smooth, is not done uniformly across the EU. Moreover, other shortcomings have prevented these rights from being used to their full potential. In September 2017, the European Commission presented a new proposal to address these issues and to strike a new balance between keeping rail operators competitive and providing adequate passenger protection. The European Parliament adopted its first-reading position on this proposal on 15 November 2018. For its part, the Council adopted its general approach on 2 December 2019, under the Finnish Presidency. Interinstitutional negotiations began at the end of January 2020, and on 1 October 2020, under the Germany Presidency, Council and Parliament reached a provisional agreement on the text. On 16 March 2021, the European Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism voted in favour of the agreed text as adopted by the Council. After more than three years of debate, the Parliament is expected to vote at second reading on this rather controversial proposal during its April 2021 plenary session.

At a glance - Research for TRAN Committee - Transport infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas

05-02-2021

The study investigates key challenges and trends concerning transport infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas . It also provides a comprehensive assessment of relevant transport policies and projects already implemented as well as policy recommendations aimed at overcoming those identified challenges and gaps.

The study investigates key challenges and trends concerning transport infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas . It also provides a comprehensive assessment of relevant transport policies and projects already implemented as well as policy recommendations aimed at overcoming those identified challenges and gaps.

Išorės autorius

VVA: Luca BISASCHI, Liviu CALOFIR , Jessica CARNEIRO, Davide CECCANTI, Francesco ROMANO, and Malin CARLBERG TEPR: Ian SKINNER

Research for TRAN Committee-Sustainable and smart urban transport

26-01-2021

Recent trends and developments indicate a growing user-centric approach to mobility, prioritising individual needs and users’ interests. Disruptive emerging technologies and shared mobility solutions bring new stakeholders to the urban ecosystem. COVID-19 has changed behaviours, with walking, cycling and private car use increasing. E-commerce demand has increased significantly, and contactless solutions are still preferred.

Recent trends and developments indicate a growing user-centric approach to mobility, prioritising individual needs and users’ interests. Disruptive emerging technologies and shared mobility solutions bring new stakeholders to the urban ecosystem. COVID-19 has changed behaviours, with walking, cycling and private car use increasing. E-commerce demand has increased significantly, and contactless solutions are still preferred.

Išorės autorius

Università degli Studi Roma Tre: Giacomo Lozzi, Edoardo Marcucci, Valerio Gatta Panteia B.V: Maria Rodrigues, Tharsis Teoh, Carolina Ramos, Eline Jonkers

Sustainable and smart mobility strategy

20-01-2021

Transport is the backbone of the EU economy, connecting people and businesses across various EU regions and countries. The coronavirus pandemic has shown the impact of mobility restrictions on the free movement of people, goods and services and, at the same time, confirmed the essential role of transport in safeguarding the functioning of vital supply chains. However, transport also generates significant costs to society, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, environmental pollution, accidents, congestion ...

Transport is the backbone of the EU economy, connecting people and businesses across various EU regions and countries. The coronavirus pandemic has shown the impact of mobility restrictions on the free movement of people, goods and services and, at the same time, confirmed the essential role of transport in safeguarding the functioning of vital supply chains. However, transport also generates significant costs to society, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, environmental pollution, accidents, congestion and loss of biodiversity. EU ambitions to address these negative impacts have increased over the years. In December 2019, the European Commission put forward the European Green Deal that aims to make the EU carbon neutral by 2050. This goal was subsequently endorsed by the European Parliament and EU Member States. To achieve climate neutrality, the EU transport sector has to cut its CO2 emissions by 90 %. This requirement is in stark contrast with the past trend: despite previously adopted measures, transport is the only sector in which greenhouse gas emissions have kept growing. The Commission has therefore proposed a strategy outlining how it wants to transform the EU transport sector and align it with the European Green Deal, by making it green, digital and resilient. While transport stakeholders have welcomed parts of the strategy as steps in the right direction, concerns about the text’s high ambitions and lack of concrete elements have been voiced. The Commission is to start proposing the measures envisaged in 2021. It remains to be seen to what extent, with what modifications and how fast they will be adopted and then implemented by EU Member States, shaping transport transformation for the years to come.

Single European Sky 2+ package: Amended Commission proposal

16-12-2020

The Single European Sky (SES) initiative aims to make EU airspace less fragmented and to improve air traffic management in terms of safety, capacity, cost-efficiency and the environment. Its current regulatory framework is based on two legislative packages: SES I (adopted in 2004), which set the principal legal framework, and SES II (adopted in 2009), which aimed to tackle substantial air traffic growth, increase safety, and reduce costs and delays and the impact of air traffic on the environment ...

The Single European Sky (SES) initiative aims to make EU airspace less fragmented and to improve air traffic management in terms of safety, capacity, cost-efficiency and the environment. Its current regulatory framework is based on two legislative packages: SES I (adopted in 2004), which set the principal legal framework, and SES II (adopted in 2009), which aimed to tackle substantial air traffic growth, increase safety, and reduce costs and delays and the impact of air traffic on the environment. Nonetheless, European airspace remains fragmented, costly and inefficient. The European Commission presented a revision of the SES in 2013 (the SES 2+ package). While the Parliament adopted its first-reading position in March 2014, in December 2014 the Council agreed only a partial general approach, owing to disagreement between the UK and Spain over the application of the text to Gibraltar airport. With Brexit having removed this blockage, and also to take into account the changed context, the Commission has amended its initial proposal. The Council and the Parliament are now discussing the revised proposal.