4

Rezultatas(-ai)

Žodis(-iai)
Publikacijos rūšis
Politikos sritis
Autorius
Raktinis žodis
Datą

International Criminal Court at 15: International justice and the crisis of multilateralism

10-05-2017

The establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) on 1 July 2002 was heralded at the time as a major breakthrough for ending impunity for most serious crimes of international concern, namely genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Fifteen years later, the record of the Court is mixed and criticism from both supporters and opponents has abounded. The challenges and the criticism it is currently facing are typical of many other multilateral institutions today. The Court has conducted ...

The establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) on 1 July 2002 was heralded at the time as a major breakthrough for ending impunity for most serious crimes of international concern, namely genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Fifteen years later, the record of the Court is mixed and criticism from both supporters and opponents has abounded. The challenges and the criticism it is currently facing are typical of many other multilateral institutions today. The Court has conducted investigations and trials on some of the world's most brutal conflicts, but it has faced criticism that it was politicised and biased against the African continent. The atrocities committed by groups such as ISIL/Da'esh have unveiled the ICC's limitations, since it is unable to investigate in Syria and Iraq, which are not parties to the Rome Statute, without UN Security Council authorisation. As a multilateral institution with universal ambitions, the Court is also limited in its effectiveness by the refusal of major powers such as the US, China and Russia to join it. Lack of cooperation by some states parties has also severely constrained its effectiveness. Yet the Court has had positive effects on the capacity of some states to deal themselves with crimes under their jurisdiction. The Court has taken its role seriously, not shying away from indicting persons of the highest rank, such as heads of state, and proving that it is committed to the principle of universal responsibility. Shortcomings in the prosecutorial investigations, for example in relation to witness interference and protection, have been addressed in a transparent and firm way.

EU Economic Diplomacy Strategy

03-03-2017

The post-World War II order is undergoing profound changes with globalisation and the emergence of new economic powers. The economy has gradually taken over as the main driver of political influence and global now transcend the old national or regional divides. As the EU was emerging as a global economic player, the economic and financial crisis made the need to tap into foreign markets all the greater. The creation of the European External Action Service (EEAS), incorporating the EU delegations, ...

The post-World War II order is undergoing profound changes with globalisation and the emergence of new economic powers. The economy has gradually taken over as the main driver of political influence and global now transcend the old national or regional divides. As the EU was emerging as a global economic player, the economic and financial crisis made the need to tap into foreign markets all the greater. The creation of the European External Action Service (EEAS), incorporating the EU delegations, and the new EU competence for direct foreign investment under the Treaty of Lisbon have given the Union the tools to assume an independent identity in economic diplomacy. As a result, the EU’s business-promotion policy evolved into a much more sophisticated economic diplomacy strategy, handled in a more structured manner by the Commission and the EEAS. The European Parliament must now be involved, beyond its legislative and scrutiny roles, in devising this new strategy. Not only could the EP add to the debate but it can also help the Commission and the EEAS with its long-established tradition of parliamentary diplomacy.

Handover of Power to a New Generation in Qatar

28-06-2013

Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa transformed his country into a bold and assertive presence on the world stage. He supported new Islamist forces in countries affected by the Arab Spring, but ensured continuity in the Gulf. The appointment of the new cabinet suggests a slightly more domestic orientation. The youthful ruler may coordinate more with regional partners, but will maintain an independent approach to international questions.

Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa transformed his country into a bold and assertive presence on the world stage. He supported new Islamist forces in countries affected by the Arab Spring, but ensured continuity in the Gulf. The appointment of the new cabinet suggests a slightly more domestic orientation. The youthful ruler may coordinate more with regional partners, but will maintain an independent approach to international questions.

High Expectations of the Moderate Cleric's Victory in Iran

14-06-2013

Centrist cleric Hassan Rowhani wins Iran's presidential election in a surprise landslide victory, securing 52 % of the votes. The Iranian presidential election took place at a time of unprecedented economic isolation. Rowhani's victory is due to an unprecedented upsurge of mobilisation a mere three days before the vote. President Rowhani will have little leeway in foreign policy matters, these powers belonging to the Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei. Whether Rowhani will be willing to challenge the primacy ...

Centrist cleric Hassan Rowhani wins Iran's presidential election in a surprise landslide victory, securing 52 % of the votes. The Iranian presidential election took place at a time of unprecedented economic isolation. Rowhani's victory is due to an unprecedented upsurge of mobilisation a mere three days before the vote. President Rowhani will have little leeway in foreign policy matters, these powers belonging to the Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei. Whether Rowhani will be willing to challenge the primacy of the clerical establishment remains to be seen. Voter turnout rose to 72 %. Out of the 51 million registered voters, 37.5 million came to the ballot box, with young voters accounting for one third. Haunted by the 2009 chaos, this election's voter turnout was instrumental in consolidating the foundations of the Islamic Republic. Ayatollah Khamenei played an instrumental role in the election, exercising great influence over the Guardian Council's vetting process. The Guardian Council disqualified reformist movement candidates. Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei, Ahmadinejad’s heir, was also barred from running. The disqualification of Rafsanjani and Mashaei was a strong indicator of the clerical establishment’s intent to micromanage the election. Recurrent allegations of rigged elections and fraud were further exacerbated by Khamenei’s attempt to engineer the election. While the massive participation by Iranians and the choice of president are a reflection of a participatory electoral process, it is primarily a victory for the Supreme Leader. Khamenei successfully used the elections to legitimise the foundations of the Islamic Republic and redeem the situation after the massive protests of 2009. The electoral outcome will have little impact on Iran’s regional policies, particularly as regards Syria, or on the nuclear issue. The election will, on the other hand, determine the fate of Iranians over the next four years. For Iranians, the election represented an opportunity

Būsimi renginiai

20-01-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable with the World Bank: Where next for the global economy
Kitas renginys -
EPRS
25-01-2021
Public Hearing on "Gender aspects of precarious work"
Klausymas -
FEMM
27-01-2021
Public hearing on AI and Green Deal
Klausymas -
AIDA

Partneriai