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EU Space programme

12-05-2021

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a budget of €16 billion to finance EU space activities during the 2021-2027 period. The majority of this would be allocated to Galileo and EGNOS, the EU's global and regional satellite navigation systems; around a third would be allocated to Copernicus, the EU's Earth Observation programme; and the remainder would be earmarked for security, such as the Space and Situational Awareness (SSA) programme and the new Governmental Satellite Communication initiative ...

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a budget of €16 billion to finance EU space activities during the 2021-2027 period. The majority of this would be allocated to Galileo and EGNOS, the EU's global and regional satellite navigation systems; around a third would be allocated to Copernicus, the EU's Earth Observation programme; and the remainder would be earmarked for security, such as the Space and Situational Awareness (SSA) programme and the new Governmental Satellite Communication initiative (GOVSATCOM) to support border protection, civil protection and humanitarian interventions. The main aims of the new space programme are to secure EU leadership in space activities, foster innovative industries, safeguard autonomous access to space and simplify governance. The European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Agency will be transformed into a new EU Agency for the Space Programme. In April 2019, after trilogue meetings, Parliament and Council reached a partial agreement on the programme, which was later incorporated by the Parliament in its first-reading position. The agreement covered most of the programme content but not the budget, relations with third countries, or operational security. Further trilogue negotiations, alongside the conclusion of MFF negotiations, helped to secure a comprehensive political agreement on 16 December 2020. The EU space programme will have a total budget of €14.8 billion. The agreed text was then adopted by the Council and Parliament in April 2021. Third edition of a briefing originally drafted by Cemal Karakas. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Global and regional trends [What Think Tanks are thinking]

30-11-2018

The European Union’s key institutions held a joint conference on 28-29 November entitled ‘Global trends to 2030: Shaping the future in a fast-changing world’. The annual event was organised under the auspices of the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS), which is a framework for cooperation between the administrations of the European Parliament, the European Commission, Council of the European Union, European External Action Service and other bodies to work together on medium- and ...

The European Union’s key institutions held a joint conference on 28-29 November entitled ‘Global trends to 2030: Shaping the future in a fast-changing world’. The annual event was organised under the auspices of the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS), which is a framework for cooperation between the administrations of the European Parliament, the European Commission, Council of the European Union, European External Action Service and other bodies to work together on medium- and long-term trends facing or relating to the European Union. This note brings together commentaries, analyses and studies by major international think tanks and research institutes on longer term trends – global and regional, with a focus on Europe. Some reports listed here were presented at the conference, some others can be found in the ESPAS repository of strategic studies, named Orbis.

Establishing the European Space Programme

15-11-2018

The Commission proposed to continue the existing space services, launch new actions and to increase the budget allocation, bringing all space-related activities under the new EU Space programme. The supporting impact assessment merely presents the proposed measures without discussing alternatives or conducting a proper impact analysis, nor does it address the costs and benefits of transforming the Global Navigation Satellite System Agency into a European Union Agency for the Space Programme, thereby ...

The Commission proposed to continue the existing space services, launch new actions and to increase the budget allocation, bringing all space-related activities under the new EU Space programme. The supporting impact assessment merely presents the proposed measures without discussing alternatives or conducting a proper impact analysis, nor does it address the costs and benefits of transforming the Global Navigation Satellite System Agency into a European Union Agency for the Space Programme, thereby falling short of the Better Regulation Guidelines requirements.

Brexit and Industry and Space Policy - workshop proceedings

09-11-2018

This document summarises the presentations and discussions of the workshop of “Brexit and Industry and Space Policy”, which was held on 24 September 2018. The effects of Brexit on EU27 business, trade, value chains, innovation and space policy were assessed. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

This document summarises the presentations and discussions of the workshop of “Brexit and Industry and Space Policy”, which was held on 24 September 2018. The effects of Brexit on EU27 business, trade, value chains, innovation and space policy were assessed. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

Išorės autorius

Bowen CALL, Bruegel Reinhilde VEUGELERS, Bruegel

Copernicus – The EU's Earth observation and monitoring programme

24-10-2017

Copernicus is the European Union's Earth observation and monitoring programme. It has a space component and a ground-based component, and provides users with data services. It is a user-driven programme under civilian control, building on existing national and European capacities, and continuing the work of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) programme. It is based on a partnership between the EU, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the EU Member States.

Copernicus is the European Union's Earth observation and monitoring programme. It has a space component and a ground-based component, and provides users with data services. It is a user-driven programme under civilian control, building on existing national and European capacities, and continuing the work of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) programme. It is based on a partnership between the EU, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the EU Member States.

Securing the Copernicus programme: Why EU earth observation matters

06-04-2017

The Copernicus programme is a user-driven programme which provides six free-of-charge operational services (atmosphere monitoring, marine environment monitoring, land monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security) to EU, national, and regional institutions, as well as to the private sector. The programme builds on the initiative on global monitoring for environment and security launched in 2001. It aims at filling the gaps in European earth observation capacities. Data is provided ...

The Copernicus programme is a user-driven programme which provides six free-of-charge operational services (atmosphere monitoring, marine environment monitoring, land monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security) to EU, national, and regional institutions, as well as to the private sector. The programme builds on the initiative on global monitoring for environment and security launched in 2001. It aims at filling the gaps in European earth observation capacities. Data is provided from space infrastructures, particularly the sentinel missions developed under the programme, and in situ infrastructure supported by the Member States. Copernicus services are mainly operated by European Union (EU) agencies. Copernicus requires a high level of continuity in data and service provision. A strong political commitment at EU level is required to provide adequate funding for the development of the operational earth observation missions and services. The EU – under the framework programme for research and operational programmes – and the European Space Agency (ESA) have invested more than €7 billion in Copernicus since 2002. By the end of 2017, four of the six sentinel missions should be fully deployed and the last of the six services should become fully operational. As Copernicus reaches its full operational stage, the focus of the programme is shifting towards the uptake of the services and the development of a downstream sector that would provide additional commercial services to the users. This aspect is a key priority of the space strategy adopted by the European Commission in October 2016. The development of the downstream sector is dependent on the long-term continuity of service, to be ensured by improved governance of the programme and renewed long-term political and financial commitments for the next EU budgetary period.

EU space policy: Industry, security and defence

14-11-2016

Autonomous space capabilities play a key role for in enhancing situational awareness, response to complex crises (natural disasters), management of natural resources (water, forests), delivery of services (health, energy, transport, communication, weather forecasting), and national security. With an increasing number of countries gaining access to outer space, the European Commission adopted a 'Space Strategy for Europe' in October 2016. This publication updates an 'at a glance' note from June 2016 ...

Autonomous space capabilities play a key role for in enhancing situational awareness, response to complex crises (natural disasters), management of natural resources (water, forests), delivery of services (health, energy, transport, communication, weather forecasting), and national security. With an increasing number of countries gaining access to outer space, the European Commission adopted a 'Space Strategy for Europe' in October 2016. This publication updates an 'at a glance' note from June 2016.