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Just Transition Fund

03-07-2020

The EU aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 50-55 % by 2030, and achieve climate neutrality by 2050. This will require a socio-economic transformation in regions relying on fossil fuels and carbon intensive industries. As part of the European Green Deal, on 14 January 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation to create the Just Transition Fund, aimed at supporting EU regions most affected by the transition to a low carbon economy. In the context of recovery from the coronavirus ...

The EU aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 50-55 % by 2030, and achieve climate neutrality by 2050. This will require a socio-economic transformation in regions relying on fossil fuels and carbon intensive industries. As part of the European Green Deal, on 14 January 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation to create the Just Transition Fund, aimed at supporting EU regions most affected by the transition to a low carbon economy. In the context of recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, an amended proposal on the Just Transition Fund (JTF) was published on 28 May 2020, increasingly the previously proposed JTF budget from €7.5 to €40 billion (in 2018 prices, with €10 billion under the core EU budget and €30 billion from Next Generation EU). Funding will be available to all Member States, while focusing on regions with the biggest transition challenges. The proposed budget for the Just Transition Fund is to be complemented with resources from cohesion policy funds and national co financing. The Fund will be part of a Just Transition Mechanism, which also includes resources under InvestEU and a public-sector loan facility. Total funding mobilised under the mechanism is expected to reach at least €150 billion. In the European Parliament, the file has been entrusted to the Committee on Regional Development (REGI). The rapporteur's draft report was published on 23 March and presented on 12 May. The REGI committee is due to vote on the report on 6 July, with a view to fixing Parliament's position for trilogue negotiations.

Covid-19 Newsletter 2: Exit strategy

03-07-2020

As EU Member States embark on a cautious de-confinement path, the economy slides into recession and the question of the proportionality of public health-related measures and their economic consequences is increasingly present in the public debate. As long as a vaccine (or an effective treatment) for the Covid-19 disease is not found and deployed, post-Covid-19 societies will have to coexist with the virus, and find an equilibrium between the social constraints resulting from health protecting measures ...

As EU Member States embark on a cautious de-confinement path, the economy slides into recession and the question of the proportionality of public health-related measures and their economic consequences is increasingly present in the public debate. As long as a vaccine (or an effective treatment) for the Covid-19 disease is not found and deployed, post-Covid-19 societies will have to coexist with the virus, and find an equilibrium between the social constraints resulting from health protecting measures and the need to mitigate as much as possible a huge economic shock, which if not addressed adequately, could have unpredictable social and political consequences. The Covid-19 crisis has shown above all the importance of joint European action. Although public health is primarily the competence of the Member States, the European Parliament has called on the Commission and the Member States to act together and to rise to the challenge and ensure that the Union emerges stronger from this crisis. In particular, a differentiated but coordinated post-lockdown approach in the EU should be ensured, in order to avoid a resurgence of the virus. The present Covid-19 Newsletter focuses on the de-confinement strategies and EU measures to support the economic recovery. An update of ongoing Covid-19 related expertise work for the ECON, EMPL, ENVI, ITRE and IMCO committees is provided at the end of this document.

New EU rules on labelling of tyres

26-06-2020

On 17 May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a new regulation on the labelling of tyres for the purposes of fuel efficiency, safety, and noise reduction. This would replace the 2009 Tyre Labelling Regulation (TLR), while maintaining and reinforcing most of its key provisions. The new regulation seeks to increase consumer awareness of the tyre label, and improve market surveillance and enforcement of TLR provisions across the EU Member States. Suppliers would be obliged to display ...

On 17 May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a new regulation on the labelling of tyres for the purposes of fuel efficiency, safety, and noise reduction. This would replace the 2009 Tyre Labelling Regulation (TLR), while maintaining and reinforcing most of its key provisions. The new regulation seeks to increase consumer awareness of the tyre label, and improve market surveillance and enforcement of TLR provisions across the EU Member States. Suppliers would be obliged to display the tyre label in all forms of purchase, including where the tyre is not physically shown in the store and where it is sold online or on a long-distance basis. Whereas the tyre label is currently applicable to passenger and light-duty vehicles, in future it would also apply to heavy-duty vehicles. The new label would include visual information on tyre performance in snow or ice conditions, and could be adjusted by means of delegated acts to include information on mileage, abrasion or re-studded tyres. Tyre labels would be included in the new European Product Database for Energy Labelling before any sale on the EU market. On 13 November 2019, successful trilogue negotiations resulted in a provisional agreement on the content of the new regulation. The legal text was finalised and the new TLR was formally adopted by the Council and Parliament in 2020 and published in the Official Journal of the EU on 5 June 2020. Its provisions become applicable from 1 May 2021.

The impact of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) on artificial intelligence

25-06-2020

This study addresses the relation between the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and artificial intelligence (AI). It considers challenges and opportunities for individuals and society, and the ways in which risks can be countered and opportunities enabled through law and technology. The study discusses the tensions and proximities between AI and data protection principles, such as in particular purpose limitation and data minimisation. It makes a thorough analysis of automated decision-making ...

This study addresses the relation between the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and artificial intelligence (AI). It considers challenges and opportunities for individuals and society, and the ways in which risks can be countered and opportunities enabled through law and technology. The study discusses the tensions and proximities between AI and data protection principles, such as in particular purpose limitation and data minimisation. It makes a thorough analysis of automated decision-making, considering the extent to which it is admissible, the safeguard measures to be adopted, and whether data subjects have a right to individual explanations. The study then considers the extent to which the GDPR provides for a preventive risk-based approach, focused on data protection by design and by default.

Išorės autorius

DG, EPRS_The study was led by Professor Giovanni Sartor, European University Institute of Florence, at the request of the Panel for the Future of Science and Technology (STOA) and managed by the Scientific Foresight Unit, within the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (EPRS) of the Secretariat of the European Parliament. It was co-authored by Professor Sartor and Dr Francesca Lagioia, European University Institute of Florence, working under his supervision.

How to Fully Reap the Benefits of the Internal Market for E-Commerce?

15-06-2020

This paper provides a framework for maximising current and potential benefits of e-commerce for the single market while minimising economic and societal costs. It takes stock of the role of the e-Commerce Directive and analyses new challenges arising in the age of platforms. Forward-looking solutions are presented to enhance cross-border e-commerce in the EU, facilitate access to digital copyrighted content and improve the sustainability of online platforms. Finally, the paper reflects on the planned ...

This paper provides a framework for maximising current and potential benefits of e-commerce for the single market while minimising economic and societal costs. It takes stock of the role of the e-Commerce Directive and analyses new challenges arising in the age of platforms. Forward-looking solutions are presented to enhance cross-border e-commerce in the EU, facilitate access to digital copyrighted content and improve the sustainability of online platforms. Finally, the paper reflects on the planned digital services act, outlining policy recommendations. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request of the committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO).

Išorės autorius

Nadina IACOB, Felice SIMONELLI

The Legal Framework for E-commerce in the Internal Market

15-06-2020

This at a glance presents an overview of the current state of play in the area of e-commerce. It discusses the existing legislative framework of the Digital Single Market as well as the technology-driven changes of market and economy that have taken place over the last twenty years. The analysis identifies areas prone to producing a positive reaction to legislative intervention. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request ...

This at a glance presents an overview of the current state of play in the area of e-commerce. It discusses the existing legislative framework of the Digital Single Market as well as the technology-driven changes of market and economy that have taken place over the last twenty years. The analysis identifies areas prone to producing a positive reaction to legislative intervention. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request of the committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO).

Išorės autorius

Ida RÜFFER, Carlos NOBREGA, Hans SCHULTE-NÖLKE, Aneta WIEWÓROWSKA-DOMAGALSKA

New aspects and challenges in consumer protection

15-06-2020

The original full study discusses the new challenges and opportunities for digital services that are provided by artificial intelligence, in particular which regard to consumer protection, data protection, and providers’ liability. The discussion addresses the way in which digital services rely on Artificial Intelligence (AI) for processing consumer data and for targeting consumers with ads and other messages, with a focus on risks to consumer privacy and autonomy, as well as on the possibility ...

The original full study discusses the new challenges and opportunities for digital services that are provided by artificial intelligence, in particular which regard to consumer protection, data protection, and providers’ liability. The discussion addresses the way in which digital services rely on Artificial Intelligence (AI) for processing consumer data and for targeting consumers with ads and other messages, with a focus on risks to consumer privacy and autonomy, as well as on the possibility of developing consumer-friendly AI applications. Also addressed is the relevance of AI for the liability of service providers in connection with the use of AI systems for detecting and responding to unlawful and harmful content.

Išorės autorius

Prof Dr Giovanni Sartor

EU–São Tomé and Príncipe fisheries agreement

11-06-2020

EU fishing vessels have long been active in the waters of the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe, in the framework of a bilateral EU fisheries agreement. The conclusion of a new protocol implementing this agreement is expected to be the subject of a consent vote in Parliament during the June plenary part-session. The protocol provides access rights for the EU fleet to fish for tunas in São Tomean waters. In addition, it aims to promote sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources in ...

EU fishing vessels have long been active in the waters of the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe, in the framework of a bilateral EU fisheries agreement. The conclusion of a new protocol implementing this agreement is expected to be the subject of a consent vote in Parliament during the June plenary part-session. The protocol provides access rights for the EU fleet to fish for tunas in São Tomean waters. In addition, it aims to promote sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources in the region and to support the development of the local fisheries sector.

EU fisheries agreement with Guinea-Bissau

11-06-2020

During the June plenary part-session, Parliament is due to vote on giving its consent to the conclusion of a new protocol to the existing EU fisheries partnership agreement with the Republic of Guinea-Bissau. Besides granting fishing opportunities to EU vessels in Guinea-Bissauan waters, the protocol aims to promote sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources and to support the efforts of Guinea-Bissau to develop its blue economy.

During the June plenary part-session, Parliament is due to vote on giving its consent to the conclusion of a new protocol to the existing EU fisheries partnership agreement with the Republic of Guinea-Bissau. Besides granting fishing opportunities to EU vessels in Guinea-Bissauan waters, the protocol aims to promote sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources and to support the efforts of Guinea-Bissau to develop its blue economy.

Sustainable Consumption and Consumer Protection Legislation

15-05-2020

This paper analyses the contribution, or lack of contribution of, the current EU Consumer Protection Legislation to a sustainable consumption and a longer lifetime of products. In addition, it gives an overview of the most relevant best practices at national and international level and provides recommendations on the future development and possible reforms of European consumer protection legislation in order to contribute to a more sustainable consumption and a longer lifetime of products. This ...

This paper analyses the contribution, or lack of contribution of, the current EU Consumer Protection Legislation to a sustainable consumption and a longer lifetime of products. In addition, it gives an overview of the most relevant best practices at national and international level and provides recommendations on the future development and possible reforms of European consumer protection legislation in order to contribute to a more sustainable consumption and a longer lifetime of products. This document was commissioned by Policy Department A at the request of the European Parliament’s Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO).

Išorės autorius

Bert KEIRSBILCK, KU Leuven Evelyne TERRYN, KU Leuven Anaïs MICHEL, KU Leuven Ivano ALOGNA, BIICL

Būsimi renginiai

06-07-2020
Geopolitical implications of the COVID-19 crisis - online hearing
Klausymas -
AFET
06-07-2020
Follow-up of OLAF case files, fighting fraud, corruption and other irregularities
Klausymas -
CONT
07-07-2020
STOA roundtable on deconfinement going digital: The rise of contact tracing apps
Seminaras -
STOA

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