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How families have coped with the financial crisis

14-10-2016

Families in the European Union (EU) were hit hard by the financial and economic crisis of 2008, which, together with its after-effects, also triggered a social crisis. If measureable changes in family patterns and the breakdown of families may not be immediately observable and directly related to the downturn, the knock-on effects of the economic and financial crisis on families are far more apparent. Throughout the EU, single-parent families (16 % of all families) are exposed to the highest risk ...

Families in the European Union (EU) were hit hard by the financial and economic crisis of 2008, which, together with its after-effects, also triggered a social crisis. If measureable changes in family patterns and the breakdown of families may not be immediately observable and directly related to the downturn, the knock-on effects of the economic and financial crisis on families are far more apparent. Throughout the EU, single-parent families (16 % of all families) are exposed to the highest risk of poverty or social exclusion. Single-parent families are predominantly composed of single mothers, who face a higher poverty risk than single fathers. The adverse impact of the economic crisis on families placed children at greater risk of poverty or social exclusion than the rest of the population in 23 of the 28 EU Member States in 2014. In the same year, there were 27.4 million children under the age of 18 living at risk of poverty or social exclusion in the EU. Two drivers have played a growing part in the rise of families' difficulties in the EU since the onset of the recession: a cyclical one – the economic crisis and the strain it put on family-supportive policies – and a structural one – the reinforcement of the phenomenon of inherited poverty. Therefore, even if family policies fall within the responsibility of the Member States, the condition of families has become a policy concern for European institutions.

High Expectations of the Moderate Cleric's Victory in Iran

14-06-2013

Centrist cleric Hassan Rowhani wins Iran's presidential election in a surprise landslide victory, securing 52 % of the votes. The Iranian presidential election took place at a time of unprecedented economic isolation. Rowhani's victory is due to an unprecedented upsurge of mobilisation a mere three days before the vote. President Rowhani will have little leeway in foreign policy matters, these powers belonging to the Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei. Whether Rowhani will be willing to challenge the primacy ...

Centrist cleric Hassan Rowhani wins Iran's presidential election in a surprise landslide victory, securing 52 % of the votes. The Iranian presidential election took place at a time of unprecedented economic isolation. Rowhani's victory is due to an unprecedented upsurge of mobilisation a mere three days before the vote. President Rowhani will have little leeway in foreign policy matters, these powers belonging to the Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei. Whether Rowhani will be willing to challenge the primacy of the clerical establishment remains to be seen. Voter turnout rose to 72 %. Out of the 51 million registered voters, 37.5 million came to the ballot box, with young voters accounting for one third. Haunted by the 2009 chaos, this election's voter turnout was instrumental in consolidating the foundations of the Islamic Republic. Ayatollah Khamenei played an instrumental role in the election, exercising great influence over the Guardian Council's vetting process. The Guardian Council disqualified reformist movement candidates. Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei, Ahmadinejad’s heir, was also barred from running. The disqualification of Rafsanjani and Mashaei was a strong indicator of the clerical establishment’s intent to micromanage the election. Recurrent allegations of rigged elections and fraud were further exacerbated by Khamenei’s attempt to engineer the election. While the massive participation by Iranians and the choice of president are a reflection of a participatory electoral process, it is primarily a victory for the Supreme Leader. Khamenei successfully used the elections to legitimise the foundations of the Islamic Republic and redeem the situation after the massive protests of 2009. The electoral outcome will have little impact on Iran’s regional policies, particularly as regards Syria, or on the nuclear issue. The election will, on the other hand, determine the fate of Iranians over the next four years. For Iranians, the election represented an opportunity

Turkmenistan: Selected Trade and Economic Issues

17-05-2013

Like a number of former Soviet Union republics in Central Asia, Turkmenistan has recently recorded quite high economic growth rates — often in the double digits — mainly thanks to the increasing global demand for energy and other raw materials, which are abundant in the country. Despite recent progress, the country's economic growth is still hampered by inefficient economic and public structures, still largely inspired by Soviet models and lacking modern infrastructure. The geographical location ...

Like a number of former Soviet Union republics in Central Asia, Turkmenistan has recently recorded quite high economic growth rates — often in the double digits — mainly thanks to the increasing global demand for energy and other raw materials, which are abundant in the country. Despite recent progress, the country's economic growth is still hampered by inefficient economic and public structures, still largely inspired by Soviet models and lacking modern infrastructure. The geographical location of Turkmenistan, a land-locked country with some 'difficult' neighbours (such as Iran and Afghanistan), also negatively influences its development. Among the former Soviet Union republics, Turkmenistan has what is probably the worst record in terms of economic and trade liberalisation. Despite growing public revenues, malnutrition still plagues remote rural areas, and poverty is widespread.

Presidential Elections in Venezuela : Towards 20 Years of Bolivarian Revolution ?

26-10-2012

President Hugo Chávez won his fourth presidential election, with 55.1% of the vote, almost 11% more than his main rival, Henrique Capriles, the candidate of a united opposition. Voter turnout was very high and voting took place in a calm atmosphere, with no irregularities reported. President Chávez was supported by a broad alliance led by his own United Socialist Party of Venezuela. He campaigned on a platform to reinforce social and economic change. Henrique Capriles was backed by an alliance integrating ...

President Hugo Chávez won his fourth presidential election, with 55.1% of the vote, almost 11% more than his main rival, Henrique Capriles, the candidate of a united opposition. Voter turnout was very high and voting took place in a calm atmosphere, with no irregularities reported. President Chávez was supported by a broad alliance led by his own United Socialist Party of Venezuela. He campaigned on a platform to reinforce social and economic change. Henrique Capriles was backed by an alliance integrating nearly all the opposition. Capriles campaigned on a platform advocating moderation and pragmatic solutions to solve Venezuela's problems. Both candidates recognised the result of the elections and stated their commitment to dialogue. However, it is doubtful whether this will lead to a more cooperative political climate. State elections will take place in mid-December, meaning that the government-opposition rivalry continues. Despite being cleared of cancer in July 2012, Chávez's health has led some to doubt whether he will conclude his new six-year term. The appointment of Nicolas Maduro as Vice President could be considered a possible succession strategy. The re-elected President Chávez and his government will need to address a number of challenges. Among the most important are the increase in crime rates and violence. Many analysts expect a devaluation of the currency, which could drive up the country's already high inflation rates. Yet, if oil prices remain high, the country should enjoy a substantial trade surplus and steady revenues, meaning that current economic policies are unlikely to change.

Women Living Alone : Evaluation of their Specific Difficulties

15-09-2008

This study presents the specific difficulties of women over 25 years of age living alone (divided into three groups: single women, single mothers and elderly women) in the European countries, highlighting national differences in the incidence and main characteristics of women living alone, and analyses the policies adopted to support their economic and living conditions, focusing on pension and assistance schemes and providing examples of good practices and policy recommendations.

This study presents the specific difficulties of women over 25 years of age living alone (divided into three groups: single women, single mothers and elderly women) in the European countries, highlighting national differences in the incidence and main characteristics of women living alone, and analyses the policies adopted to support their economic and living conditions, focusing on pension and assistance schemes and providing examples of good practices and policy recommendations.

Ārējais autors

IRS – Istituto per la Ricerca Sociale (Milano, Italy)

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