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Members of the European Parliament from February 2020

18-09-2020

In May 2019, on a turnout of 51%, European Union citizens elected their representatives to the European Parliament for the next five years. On 31 January 2020, the United Kingdom withdrew from the Union. Of the 73 seats vacated by Members elected in the UK, 27 have been redistributed among 14 Member States, while 46 remain available for potential EU enlargements and/or the possible creation of a transnational constituency in the future. The number of seats in the Parliament has fallen from 751 to ...

In May 2019, on a turnout of 51%, European Union citizens elected their representatives to the European Parliament for the next five years. On 31 January 2020, the United Kingdom withdrew from the Union. Of the 73 seats vacated by Members elected in the UK, 27 have been redistributed among 14 Member States, while 46 remain available for potential EU enlargements and/or the possible creation of a transnational constituency in the future. The number of seats in the Parliament has fallen from 751 to 705. The 705 MEPs elected have an average age of 51 years (with the youngest being 22 and the oldest 83). A majority of MEPs (415) are new to the Parliament. Women now represent 39.6% of all MEPs.

European Commission: Facts and Figures

12-01-2016

The European Commission is the executive body of the European Union. Under the Treaties, its tasks are to ‘promote the general interest of the Union’, without prejudice to individual Member States, ‘ensure the application of the Treaties’ and adopted measures, and ‘execute the budget’. It further holds a virtual monopoly on legislative initiative, as it proposes nearly all EU legislation to the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union. The College of Commissioners is composed of ...

The European Commission is the executive body of the European Union. Under the Treaties, its tasks are to ‘promote the general interest of the Union’, without prejudice to individual Member States, ‘ensure the application of the Treaties’ and adopted measures, and ‘execute the budget’. It further holds a virtual monopoly on legislative initiative, as it proposes nearly all EU legislation to the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union. The College of Commissioners is composed of 28 individuals. The college which came into office in November 2014 has an explicit hierarchy created through the designation by the President of seven Vice-Presidents, heading ‘project teams’ of the other 20 Commissioners. The briefing sets out the responsibilities, composition and work of the Commission and its leadership, both in the current Commission and in the past. It also sheds light on the staff of the Commission’s departments, their main places of employment, gender distribution and national background. Finally, it provides a breakdown of the EU’s administrative budget and budget management responsibilities.

2014 European Elections: Profile of voters and non-voters

02-06-2015

A few months after the 2014 European elections, the time has come to examine in depth the reasons for participation and abstention in the contest. The Directorate-General for Communication in the European Parliament has commissioned desk research to analyse the electoral behaviour of voters and non-voters, in order to better understand the reasons underlying their decision either to vote or abstain, and to analyse their attitudes and opinions regarding the EU. This document is based on a post-election ...

A few months after the 2014 European elections, the time has come to examine in depth the reasons for participation and abstention in the contest. The Directorate-General for Communication in the European Parliament has commissioned desk research to analyse the electoral behaviour of voters and non-voters, in order to better understand the reasons underlying their decision either to vote or abstain, and to analyse their attitudes and opinions regarding the EU. This document is based on a post-election survey of more than 27,000 Europeans over the age of 18 (16 in Austria), carried out by TNS Opinion a few days after the vote, between 30 May and 27 June 2014.  It is divided in three parts: the desk research on voters and non-voters, and two series of factsheets per EU Member State, one dedicated to voters and another to non-voters. For Belgium, Luxembourg (compulsory vote for both countries) and Malta (high level of turnout), a factsheet on non-voters is not provided, given the low number of non-voters. ***This document is available in all EU official languages in the Eurobarometer page of Europarl.

European Parliament: Facts and Figures

20-04-2015

This Briefing, published by the European Parliamentary Research Service, is designed to provide key facts and figures about the European Parliament, both today and in previous terms since direct elections were introduced in June 1979. On the following pages you will find graphics of various kinds which: - detail the composition of the European Parliament now and in the past; - trace the increase in the number of parties represented in the Parliament and show the evolution of political groups; - chart ...

This Briefing, published by the European Parliamentary Research Service, is designed to provide key facts and figures about the European Parliament, both today and in previous terms since direct elections were introduced in June 1979. On the following pages you will find graphics of various kinds which: - detail the composition of the European Parliament now and in the past; - trace the increase in the number of parties represented in the Parliament and show the evolution of political groups; - chart the rise in the number of women sitting in the Parliament; - explain the electoral systems used in elections to the Parliament across the Member States; - show how turnout in European elections compares with that in national elections; - summarise the activity of the Parliament in the last term from 2009 to 2014; - present the annual cost of the Parliament compared with other parliaments; - outline the composition of the Parliament’s main governing bodies. This is an updated version of a briefing published in November 2014

EU demographic indicators: Situation, trends and potential challenges

18-03-2015

Europe's share of the global population is declining and its population is ageing. Unemployment is still high, although rates vary between Member States, as well as within them. Women, young adults and older workers have a higher risk of unemployment, while the number of part-time workers is increasing. Migrants represent 7% of the European population and account for around 7% of total employment. They are usually younger and more likely to face disproportionately heavy housing costs, to live in ...

Europe's share of the global population is declining and its population is ageing. Unemployment is still high, although rates vary between Member States, as well as within them. Women, young adults and older workers have a higher risk of unemployment, while the number of part-time workers is increasing. Migrants represent 7% of the European population and account for around 7% of total employment. They are usually younger and more likely to face disproportionately heavy housing costs, to live in overcrowded households and to be more materially deprived than nationals, although, within the group, trends diverge between migrants from other EU Member States and third-country migrants. Differences in the distribution of income are observed, although they are still lower than in many other parts of the world. Almost a quarter of Europeans face the risk of poverty or social exclusion, a risk which has a strong geographical dimension and varies among social groups. If current trends persist, there will be an increasing mismatch, with fewer low-skill jobs on offer to growing numbers of low-skilled workers and fewer qualified candidates to meet increasing demand for high-skilled labour. A shrinking workforce will have to provide for a growing number of retired persons. Migration, which is still substantial, may slow down and possibly shift towards developing countries with strong growth. Finally, the middle class may shrink and more wealth be concentrated in the hands of the richest. These trends present an opportunity for debate on concepts such as 'working age', and the adoption of well-designed comprehensive policies that will strengthen social cohesion and promote solidarity between generations.

European Parliament: Facts and Figures

24-11-2014

This briefing provides key facts and figures about the European Parliament, both today and in previous terms since direct elections were introduced in 1979. It includes graphics of various kinds which: detail the composition of the European Parliament now and in the past; trace the increase in the number of parties represented in the Parliament and show the evolution of political groups; chart the rise in the number of women sitting in the Parliament; explain the electoral systems used in elections ...

This briefing provides key facts and figures about the European Parliament, both today and in previous terms since direct elections were introduced in 1979. It includes graphics of various kinds which: detail the composition of the European Parliament now and in the past; trace the increase in the number of parties represented in the Parliament and show the evolution of political groups; chart the rise in the number of women sitting in the Parliament; explain the electoral systems used in elections to the Parliament across the Member States; show how turnout in European elections compares with that in national elections; summarise the activity of the Parliament in the last term from 2009 to 2014; present the annual cost of the Parliament compared with other parliaments; outline the composition of the Parliament’s main governing bodies. For more recent information, please see the updated version of this publication published on 20 April 2015.

Ageing population: projections 2010 - 2060 for the EU27

30-01-2014

Ageing of the European Union (EU) population has a major impact on society and in terms of economics. A decreasing birth rate and an increase in life expectancy are expected to transform the shape of the EU’s age pyramid and also raise the median age. In the 50 years from 2010 to 2060, the population aged 65 or over as a proportion of the working age population (aged 15-64) will almost double, rising from one older person for every four workers to one for every two. Persons active in the labour force ...

Ageing of the European Union (EU) population has a major impact on society and in terms of economics. A decreasing birth rate and an increase in life expectancy are expected to transform the shape of the EU’s age pyramid and also raise the median age. In the 50 years from 2010 to 2060, the population aged 65 or over as a proportion of the working age population (aged 15-64) will almost double, rising from one older person for every four workers to one for every two. Persons active in the labour force will face an increasing tax burden and higher social contributions in order to support their elders. Alternatively, older citizens will need to accept lower levels of support and services or a higher pension age. This spotlight highlights the major changes projected to take place in the five decades from 2010. It looks at the age profile of the EU population and shows the expected evolution in life expectancy, median age and labour force in Member States. Finally it shows the implications of an ageing society on social expenditure on old-age pensions, healthcare and long-term care.

Ageing population: projections 2010 - 2060 for the EU27

11-12-2013

Ageing of the European Union (EU) population has a major impact on society and in terms of economics. A decreasing birth rate and an increase in life expectancy are expected to transform the shape of the EU’s age pyramid and also raise the median age. In the 50 years from 2010 to 2060, the population aged 65 or over as a proportion of the working age population (aged 15-64) will almost double, rising from one older person for every four workers to one for every two. Persons active in the labour force ...

Ageing of the European Union (EU) population has a major impact on society and in terms of economics. A decreasing birth rate and an increase in life expectancy are expected to transform the shape of the EU’s age pyramid and also raise the median age. In the 50 years from 2010 to 2060, the population aged 65 or over as a proportion of the working age population (aged 15-64) will almost double, rising from one older person for every four workers to one for every two. Persons active in the labour force will face an increasing tax burden and higher social contributions in order to support their elders. Alternatively, older citizens will need to accept lower levels of support and services or a higher pension age. This spotlight highlights the major changes projected to take place in the five decades from 2010. It looks at the age profile of the EU population and shows the expected evolution in life expectancy, median age and labour force in Member States. Finally it shows the implications of an ageing society on social expenditure on old-age pensions, healthcare and long-term care.

The Demographic Future of Europe Compilation of briefing papers for the Hearing (28 Mai 2008)

23-06-2008

Ārējais autors

INED - Institut national d'études démographiques M. François Héran Directeur 133, Boulevard Davout F-75980 Paris Cedex 20 France M. Hervé Le Bras 26, rue Vavin F-75006 Paris France

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