21

rezultāts(-i)

Vārds(-i)
Publikācijas veids
Politikas joma
Jautājuma autors
Atslēgvārds
Datums

General revision of the European Parliament's Rules of Procedure: Achieving greater transparency and efficiency as of January 2017

16-07-2018

The last general and extensive overhaul of the European Parliament’s Rules of Procedure, which entered into force as of 16 January 2017, was intended to bring more transparency and efficiency to parliamentary work. Among the numerous modifications, may be noted the increased attention to the conduct of Members, the streamlining of the types of thresholds for procedural requests, the increased transparency surrounding the decision to begin negotiations during the various stages of the legislative ...

The last general and extensive overhaul of the European Parliament’s Rules of Procedure, which entered into force as of 16 January 2017, was intended to bring more transparency and efficiency to parliamentary work. Among the numerous modifications, may be noted the increased attention to the conduct of Members, the streamlining of the types of thresholds for procedural requests, the increased transparency surrounding the decision to begin negotiations during the various stages of the legislative procedure, the abolition of written declarations and the modification of the maximum number of questions for written answer allowed. These and further modifications required to adapt to the 2016 Interinstititional Agreement on Better Law-making were introduced to bring clarity, incorporate existing practices and correct redundancies or inconsistencies.

Commissioner-designate – Mariya Gabriel

28-06-2017

Mariya Gabriel has been designated Commissioner for the Digital Economy and Society. The Committees on Industry, Research and Energy and on Culture and Education jointly held a hearing with her on 20 June 2017. Parliament is due to vote on her appointment on 4 July.

Mariya Gabriel has been designated Commissioner for the Digital Economy and Society. The Committees on Industry, Research and Energy and on Culture and Education jointly held a hearing with her on 20 June 2017. Parliament is due to vote on her appointment on 4 July.

Electing the European Parliament's President

10-01-2017

At the January plenary sitting, the European Parliament (EP) is due to elect its 30th President, to hold the office until the next European parliamentary elections, due in 2019. The President has an important and increasingly visible function in the EU institutional and international setting, mirroring the influential role of the Parliament as a shaper of EU policies and co-legislator.

At the January plenary sitting, the European Parliament (EP) is due to elect its 30th President, to hold the office until the next European parliamentary elections, due in 2019. The President has an important and increasingly visible function in the EU institutional and international setting, mirroring the influential role of the Parliament as a shaper of EU policies and co-legislator.

The role of constitutional courts in multi-level governance - European Union: The Court of Justice of the European Union

30-11-2016

This study will analyse the role and competences assigned to the Court of Justice of the European Union by the founding Treaties, the Statute and the Rules of Procedure. Particular attention will be paid to the functions carried out by the Court in resolving disputes between institutions, between the Member States and between the Members States and the institutions in a multi-level governance system. The objective is to facilitate comparison with the competences granted to the Constitutional Courts ...

This study will analyse the role and competences assigned to the Court of Justice of the European Union by the founding Treaties, the Statute and the Rules of Procedure. Particular attention will be paid to the functions carried out by the Court in resolving disputes between institutions, between the Member States and between the Members States and the institutions in a multi-level governance system. The objective is to facilitate comparison with the competences granted to the Constitutional Courts of the Member States. This study was written by Prof Dr Vincenzo Salvatore of the University of Insubria, Varese (Italy), at the request of the Comparative Law Library Unit of the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) of the General Secretariat of the European Parliament.

Ārējais autors

DG, EPRS; EPRS, DG

Parliament's committees of inquiry and special committees

02-06-2016

The European Parliament has recently been making increasing use of its investigative instruments – special and inquiry committees. The TAXE Committee, established in the aftermath of the 'LuxLeaks' scandal to look into unfair tax practices in the EU, was followed by the TAXE 2 special committee on tax rulings. The EMIS committee of inquiry is looking into emission measurements in the automotive sector. The recently revealed 'Panama papers' prompted a new committee of inquiry on tax havens. Parliament's ...

The European Parliament has recently been making increasing use of its investigative instruments – special and inquiry committees. The TAXE Committee, established in the aftermath of the 'LuxLeaks' scandal to look into unfair tax practices in the EU, was followed by the TAXE 2 special committee on tax rulings. The EMIS committee of inquiry is looking into emission measurements in the automotive sector. The recently revealed 'Panama papers' prompted a new committee of inquiry on tax havens. Parliament's right of inquiry is an important instrument for the exercise of its control functions. Its investigative powers, however, fall short of the powers of committees of inquiry in national parliaments, which have quasi-judicial investigative tools at their disposal. Committees of inquiry are limited to examinations of alleged contraventions and maladministration in the implementation of EU law, thus excluding evidence-gathering about general subjects and inquiries into actions by third-country authorities. 'Special committees', on the other hand, can be set up for any parliamentary inquiry and have thus been used more often by Parliament. Although they are not equipped with formal powers, special committees conduct their work using the same investigative mechanisms as committees of inquiry. The Lisbon Treaty conferred on Parliament the power to propose and adopt a binding regulation on the inquiry rules.

Preparing a Harmonized Maternity Leave for Members of the European Parliament - Legal Analysis

20-04-2016

Upon request by the FEMM Committee, the Policy Department has examined the Member States' different national legislations for maternity or parental leave for national members of Parliament. Furthermore, the rules concerning absence and leave for Members of the European Parliament have also been explored. The overview of the European and national rules provide insights in the different ways how maternity or parental leave is regulated for members of parliament at both levels. It concludes that the ...

Upon request by the FEMM Committee, the Policy Department has examined the Member States' different national legislations for maternity or parental leave for national members of Parliament. Furthermore, the rules concerning absence and leave for Members of the European Parliament have also been explored. The overview of the European and national rules provide insights in the different ways how maternity or parental leave is regulated for members of parliament at both levels. It concludes that the provisions of the European Electoral Act prohibit presently the introduction of rules for maternity or parental leave with a possibility of temporary replacement for MEPs.

Understanding the d'Hondt method: Allocation of parliamentary seats and leadership positions

08-04-2016

The allocation of seats in collegiate organs such as parliaments requires a method to translate votes proportionally into whole seats. The 'd'Hondt method' is a mathematical formula used widely in proportional representation systems, although it leads to less proportional results than other systems for seat allocation such as the Hare-Niemeyer and Sainte-Laguë/Schepers methods. Moreover, it tends to increase the advantage for the electoral lists gaining most votes to the detriment of those with fewer ...

The allocation of seats in collegiate organs such as parliaments requires a method to translate votes proportionally into whole seats. The 'd'Hondt method' is a mathematical formula used widely in proportional representation systems, although it leads to less proportional results than other systems for seat allocation such as the Hare-Niemeyer and Sainte-Laguë/Schepers methods. Moreover, it tends to increase the advantage for the electoral lists gaining most votes to the detriment of those with fewer votes. It is, however, effective in facilitating majority formation and thus in securing parliamentary operability. The d'Hondt method is used by 17 EU Member States for the elections to the European Parliament. Furthermore, it is also used within the Parliament as a formula for distributing the chairs of the parliamentary committees and delegations, as well as to distribute those posts among the national delegations within the political groups. Such proportional distribution of leadership positions within Parliament prevents domination of parliamentary political life by only one or two large political groups, ensuring smaller political groups also have a say on the political agenda. Some argue however that this limits the impact of the election results on the political direction of decision-making within Parliament and call for a 'winner-takes-all' approach instead. Many national parliaments in the EU also distribute committee chairs and other posts proportionally among political groups (either using the d'Hondt method or more informally). Other Member States, however, apply a 'winner-takes-more' approach with only some committee chairs with particular relevance to government scrutiny being reserved for opposition groups, while in the US House of Representatives committee chairs have to come from the majority party. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format xxxx

New Members of the European Court of Auditors

05-04-2016

In 2016, the terms of ten out of the 28 Members of the European Court of Auditors comes to an end. Five candidates among six nominees for the current renewal are new faces. After their presentation at a meeting of the Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) and the subsequent vote on each candidature, it is up to the European Parliament's plenary to decide which of the candidates to recommend to the Council as suitable to be appointed.

In 2016, the terms of ten out of the 28 Members of the European Court of Auditors comes to an end. Five candidates among six nominees for the current renewal are new faces. After their presentation at a meeting of the Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) and the subsequent vote on each candidature, it is up to the European Parliament's plenary to decide which of the candidates to recommend to the Council as suitable to be appointed.

The right to petition the European Parliament

19-06-2015

The right to petition the European Parliament (EP) was formally set out in the Maastricht Treaty as one of the rights of European Union citizenship. Parliament's predecessors, from the beginnings of the Communities in the 1950s, had already recognised the importance of receiving petitions from citizens, and this has become a major expression of the Parliament's role as direct representative of EU citizens. The EP's practice is based on those of national parliaments, though is more extensive compared ...

The right to petition the European Parliament (EP) was formally set out in the Maastricht Treaty as one of the rights of European Union citizenship. Parliament's predecessors, from the beginnings of the Communities in the 1950s, had already recognised the importance of receiving petitions from citizens, and this has become a major expression of the Parliament's role as direct representative of EU citizens. The EP's practice is based on those of national parliaments, though is more extensive compared to many national parliaments in terms of scope. The right of petition has developed substantially over time. In particular petitions addressed to the EP's Committee on Petitions (PETI Committee) and then transferred to the Commission can potentially lead to infringement procedures against Member States. There are, however, still some issues over effectively ensuring the exercise of the right – in particular concerning the responsiveness of the Commission and involving national parliaments more effectively. These have led to a number of suggestions regarding the deadlines for the Commission to respond to PETI Committee requests for information and follow-up, and on ensuring regular information flow between the EP and the Commission. Other practical proposals deal with cooperation with national parliaments, in particular through a network involving the EP and national parliaments, and the closer involvement of Member States' representatives in the PETI Committee's meetings. Suggestions also concern achieving greater visibility and effectiveness of the PETI Committee within the European Parliament itself, including developments of its own procedure.

Rules on political groups in the EP

19-06-2015

Members of the European Parliament may form political groups; these are not organised by nationality, but by political affiliation. At the start of the current parliamentary term there were seven political groups in the Parliament, as there were throughout the 2009-14 period. The formation of a new, eighth, political group, to be called Europe of Nations and Freedoms, has been announced recently. To form a political group, a minimum of 25 MEPs, elected from at least one quarter (currently seven ...

Members of the European Parliament may form political groups; these are not organised by nationality, but by political affiliation. At the start of the current parliamentary term there were seven political groups in the Parliament, as there were throughout the 2009-14 period. The formation of a new, eighth, political group, to be called Europe of Nations and Freedoms, has been announced recently. To form a political group, a minimum of 25 MEPs, elected from at least one quarter (currently seven) of the EU's Member States is required. Those Members (MEPs) who do not belong to any political group are known as 'non-attached' (non-inscrits) Members. Although the political groups play a very prominent role in Parliament's life, individual MEPs and/or several MEPs acting together also have many rights, including in respect of the exercise of oversight over other EU institutions, such as the Commission. However, belonging to a political group is of a particular relevance for the allocation of key positions in Parliament's political and organisational structures, such as committee and delegation chairs and rapporteurships on important dossiers. Moreover, political groups receive higher funding for their collective staff and parliamentary activities than the non-attached MEPs. Political-group funding is however to be distinguished from funding granted to European political parties and foundations, which, if they comply with the requirements to register as such, may apply for funding from the European Parliament if they are represented in Parliament by at least one Member. This briefing updates an earlier one of June 2014.

Gaidāmie notikumi

30-11-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | How to own the room (and the zoom) [...]
Cits pasākums -
EPRS
30-11-2020
Hearing on Future-proofing the Tourism Sector: Challenges and Opportunities Ahead
Uzklausīšana -
TRAN
30-11-2020
LIBE - FEMM Joint Hearing: Combating Gender based Violence: Cyber Violence
Uzklausīšana -
FEMM LIBE

Partneri