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Waste Shipment Regulation

08-04-2021

The New Circular Economy Action Plan is one of the main building blocks of the European Green Deal. It sets initiatives along the entire lifecycle of products with the aim to ensure that the resources used for their production, including the waste generated, are kept in the EU economy for as long as possible. At the same time, the circular economy policy aims at protecting the environment and empowering the consumers. Waste shipment within and outside the EU has a crucial role in achieving the EU ...

The New Circular Economy Action Plan is one of the main building blocks of the European Green Deal. It sets initiatives along the entire lifecycle of products with the aim to ensure that the resources used for their production, including the waste generated, are kept in the EU economy for as long as possible. At the same time, the circular economy policy aims at protecting the environment and empowering the consumers. Waste shipment within and outside the EU has a crucial role in achieving the EU circular economy objectives. At EU level, the transboundary movements of waste are governed by Regulation (EC) 1013/2006 on shipments of waste (WSR). However, the current design and implementation of the regulation suffer from deficiencies and thus challenge the achievement of the EU circular economy objectives. This Implementation Appraisal looks at the practical implementation of the WSR in light of the Commission proposal for a revision of the regulation expected in the second quarter of 2021.

InvestEU programme: The EU's new investment support scheme

30-03-2021

The InvestEU programme is a single investment support mechanism for the 2021-2027 period. It brings together various EU financial instruments for internal policies previously supported by different funds and programmes of the EU budget. On 26 March 2021, the InvestEU Regulation entered into force, with retroactive application from 1 January 2021. The EU guarantee, set at €26.2 billion, is expected to mobilise at least €372 billion of investment across the EU (in current prices). In addition, at Parliament's ...

The InvestEU programme is a single investment support mechanism for the 2021-2027 period. It brings together various EU financial instruments for internal policies previously supported by different funds and programmes of the EU budget. On 26 March 2021, the InvestEU Regulation entered into force, with retroactive application from 1 January 2021. The EU guarantee, set at €26.2 billion, is expected to mobilise at least €372 billion of investment across the EU (in current prices). In addition, at Parliament's insistence, European Investment Bank legacy portfolios will be consolidated with InvestEU, which could mobilise an extra €35-40 billion in investment. Under the national compartment, Member States are able to allocate amounts to InvestEU from funds under shared management and from the new Recovery and Resilience Facility. Composed of four policy windows (sustainable infrastructure; research, innovation and digitalisation; SMEs; and social investment and skills), InvestEU is designed to contribute to the green transition in various ways, including through investment targets and a horizontal Just Transition Scheme.

First appraisal of the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement by Policy Department A

30-03-2021

“Agreements concluded by the Union are binding upon the institutions of the Union and on its Member States.” (Article 216(2) TFEU). According to the Case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), International law takes precedence over (secondary) EU law: “It should also be pointed out that, by virtue of Article 216(2) TFEU, where international agreements are concluded by the European Union they are binding upon its institutions and, consequently, they prevail over acts of the European ...

“Agreements concluded by the Union are binding upon the institutions of the Union and on its Member States.” (Article 216(2) TFEU). According to the Case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), International law takes precedence over (secondary) EU law: “It should also be pointed out that, by virtue of Article 216(2) TFEU, where international agreements are concluded by the European Union they are binding upon its institutions and, consequently, they prevail over acts of the European Union (see, to this effect, Case C‑61/94 Commission v Germany [1996] ECR I‑3989, paragraph 52; Case C‑311/04 Algemene Scheeps Agentuur Dordrecht [2006] ECR I‑609, paragraph 25; Case C‑308/06 Intertanko and Others [2008] ECR I‑4057, paragraph 42; and Joined Cases C‑402/05 P and C‑415/05 P Kadi and Al Barakaat International Foundation v Council and Commission [2008] ECR I‑6351, paragraph 307)” . Arguably, acts adopted by bodies established by the EU-UK TCA could also enjoy primacy: “7 It follows [...] that decisions of the EEC-Turkey Association Council are measures adopted by a body provided for by the Agreement and empowered by the Contracting Parties to adopt such measures. 18 In so far as they implement the objectives set by the Agreement, such decisions are directly connected with the Agreement and, as a result of the second sentence of Article 22(1) thereof, have the effect of binding the Contracting Parties. 19 By virtue of the Agreement, the Contracting Parties agreed to be bound by such decisions and if those parties were to withdraw from that commitment, that would constitute a breach of the Agreement itself.

Ārējais autors

Andreas Huber at Al.

EU climate action policy: Responding to the global emergency

18-03-2021

The European Green Deal aims to make the European Union climate-neutral by 2050, a target supported by all EU institutions. With this objective, the EU takes a leading role in addressing the global climate emergency. Achieving the climate-neutrality goal requires massive investment and an unprecedented transformation of all sectors of the economy. This study explains the physical basis of climate change and highlights its expected impacts on the EU. To give an overview of EU and international climate ...

The European Green Deal aims to make the European Union climate-neutral by 2050, a target supported by all EU institutions. With this objective, the EU takes a leading role in addressing the global climate emergency. Achieving the climate-neutrality goal requires massive investment and an unprecedented transformation of all sectors of the economy. This study explains the physical basis of climate change and highlights its expected impacts on the EU. To give an overview of EU and international climate policies, it outlines international climate agreements, EU climate action and the climate policies of major economies. It assesses the coherence of EU climate policy with other policy areas, and presents the financing of EU climate action through the EU budget and other instruments. To assess the implications of the climate neutrality objective, the study analysis the challenges and opportunities for the EU economy and its impacts on issues such as international relations, migration, trade, consumers and health . The final chapter addresses the issues facing European decision-makers and the outlook for European and global climate action in the context of the coronavirus pandemic.

Energy Efficiency Directive

15-03-2021

The Energy Efficiency Directive (EED) was adopted in 2012 to promote energy efficiency across the EU and to help the EU to reach its (at least) 20 % energy efficiency target by 2020. In 2018, the EED was amended as part of the 'Clean energy for all Europeans package'. The amendments included raising the EU energy efficiency target to (at least) 32.5 %, to be achieved by 2030, among other things. The European Commission plans to submit its proposal for the revision of the EED in June 2021, with the ...

The Energy Efficiency Directive (EED) was adopted in 2012 to promote energy efficiency across the EU and to help the EU to reach its (at least) 20 % energy efficiency target by 2020. In 2018, the EED was amended as part of the 'Clean energy for all Europeans package'. The amendments included raising the EU energy efficiency target to (at least) 32.5 %, to be achieved by 2030, among other things. The European Commission plans to submit its proposal for the revision of the EED in June 2021, with the aim of better adjusting the EED to the European Green Deal objectives and an increased climate ambition. Improvements will aim to achieve the objective for Europe to become the first climate-neutral continent, with net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

Policy Departments’ Monthly Highlights - March 2021

08-03-2021

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

InvestEU programme

03-03-2021

InvestEU is a single investment support mechanism for the 2021-2027 period, which streamlines various EU financial instruments for internal policies previously supported by different funds of the EU budget. Parliament is due to vote on the first-reading agreement on InvestEU during its March I 2021 plenary part-session.

InvestEU is a single investment support mechanism for the 2021-2027 period, which streamlines various EU financial instruments for internal policies previously supported by different funds of the EU budget. Parliament is due to vote on the first-reading agreement on InvestEU during its March I 2021 plenary part-session.

CAN NATURE GET IT RIGHT? A Study on Rights of Nature in the European Context

01-03-2021

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, explores the concept of “Rights of Nature” (RoN) and its different aspects in legal philosophy and international agreements, as well as in legislation and case-law on different levels. The study delves on the ideas of rights of nature in comparison with rights to nature, legal personhood and standing in court for natural entities, and analyses ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, explores the concept of “Rights of Nature” (RoN) and its different aspects in legal philosophy and international agreements, as well as in legislation and case-law on different levels. The study delves on the ideas of rights of nature in comparison with rights to nature, legal personhood and standing in court for natural entities, and analyses ECtHR and CJEU case-law on access to justice in environmental decision-making. It emphasises, in particular, the need to strengthen the requirements for independent scientific evaluations in certain permit regimes under EU law. The study also highlights the crucial importance of promoting the role of civil society as watchdog over the implementation of EU environmental law by way of a wider access to justice via both the national courts and the CJEU, which is also in line with the political priorities for delivering the European Green Deal.

Ārējais autors

Jan DARPÖ

What if we could engineer the planet to help fight climate change?

23-02-2021

Efforts to curb carbon emissions are falling short ‒ and geoengineering is again in the spotlight. Will governments end up tinkering with Earth’s thermostat?

Efforts to curb carbon emissions are falling short ‒ and geoengineering is again in the spotlight. Will governments end up tinkering with Earth’s thermostat?

Carbon dioxide removal: Nature-based and technological solutions

23-02-2021

As a party to the Paris Agreement, the European Union has committed to implementing climate mitigation policies to keep the average temperature rise to well below 2°C, while pursuing efforts to limit it to 1.5°C. Meeting the more ambitious goal of 1.5°C requires bringing the level of global net greenhouse gas emissions to zero by around 2050, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Following this scientific consensus, the European Commission presented in 2019 the European ...

As a party to the Paris Agreement, the European Union has committed to implementing climate mitigation policies to keep the average temperature rise to well below 2°C, while pursuing efforts to limit it to 1.5°C. Meeting the more ambitious goal of 1.5°C requires bringing the level of global net greenhouse gas emissions to zero by around 2050, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Following this scientific consensus, the European Commission presented in 2019 the European Green Deal as the strategy towards a climate-neutral Europe by 2050, and proposed a European climate law in 2020 to make this target legally binding. The IPCC scenarios consistent with limiting the temperature rise to 1.5°C show that removing CO2 from the atmosphere is essential and complements the implementation of emissions reduction policies. In line with this, the European science academies recommend prioritising deep emissions cuts, but also to start developing a portfolio of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) options immediately. Various options are being discussed in light of the growing consensus that meeting the established targets is dependent on CDR. These range from nature-based practices – such as forestation, soil carbon sequestration and wetland restoration – to technological alternatives such as enhanced weathering, bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, and direct air capture and storage. Nature-based solutions stand out as more cost-effective and viable in the short run, while some technological alternatives have potential to become more relevant later this century. The European Commission recognises the crucial role of CDR, and intends to focus on nature-based options. An extensive revision of the EU climate mitigation legislation, planned for 2021, will provide an opportunity to set a regulatory framework for CDR. The European Parliament has repeatedly called for prioritising emissions reductions over CDR, and stressed the importance of conserving biodiversity and enhancing natural sinks and reservoirs. Its position on the proposed European climate law involves removing GHGs that exceed manmade emissions in the EU and each Member State from 2051.

Gaidāmie notikumi

13-04-2021
Decarbonisation of the energy system
Uzklausīšana -
ITRE
13-04-2021
AFCO Public Hearing on the Reform of European Electoral Law - 13 April 2021
Uzklausīšana -
AFCO
13-04-2021
Hearing on "Interference through advertisement"
Uzklausīšana -
INGE IMCO

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