Fittex

Ir-riżultati tiegħek

Qed tara 10 minn 13 riżultati

Although freshwater is relatively abundant in the European Union (EU), water stress occurs in many areas, particularly in the Mediterranean region and parts of the Atlantic region, with environmental and economic impacts. In May 2018, the European Commission put forward a proposal for a regulation setting EU-wide standards that reclaimed water would need to meet in order to be used for agricultural irrigation, with the aim of encouraging greater use of reclaimed water and contributing to alleviating ...

The Commission proposal aims to increase the uptake of water reuse for agricultural irrigation. The supporting impact assessment (IA) is based on extensive data and analysis. The range of options, the scope and the analysis of impacts, and the stakeholder consultation seem to have been done in line with the Better Regulation Guidelines. However, the objectives set in the IA are not time-bound, nor measurable. Furthermore, proportionality of the options and the presentation of the problem could be ...

Water protection and management

Skedi Informattivi dwar l-UE 01-11-2017

Water is essential for human, animal and plant life and is an indispensable resource for the economy. Its protection and management transcend national boundaries. EU water legislation was transformed with the adoption in 2000 of the Water Framework Directive (WFD), which introduced a holistic approach for the management and protection of surface waters and groundwater based on river basins. The WFD is supplemented by international agreements and legislation relating to water quantity, quality and ...

Water use in the EU

Briefing 27-04-2016

Water stress is st eadily increasing, as a result either of droughts – a temporary decline in water resources due to low rainfall – or situations of water scarcity, where demand exceeds the level of sustainable use. Assessment of the global use of water resources is hampered by the lack of established standards, and conventional measurements may yield diverging results. Data extracted in April 2016. This is an updated version of a document published in May 2015.

The human right to water has been firmly established and its implications for policy-making have been discussed in many fields. Thus far, this has hardly been the case for conflicts over water. This study discusses what it means to integrate human rights in the context of governing water and addressing conflicts over water. A human rights perspective on conflicts over water will help formulating equitable water governance strategies. To support such developments, the EU should integrate human rights ...

Potential benefits of EU water legislation

Mad-Daqqa t''Għajn 16-06-2015

The Water Framework Directive, adopted in December 2000, set an ambitious target of achieving ‘good’ ecological status for all Europe’s rivers by 2015. Today however, 50% of European surface water is of poor ecological status and the chemical status of 40% is ‘unknown’. With better implementation of the legislation, and reaching the target of good ecological status for all European water bodies, the benefits would be at least €2.8 billion a year.

Water use in the EU

Briefing 29-05-2015

Water stress is steadily increasing, as a result either of droughts – a temporary decline in water resources due to low rainfall – or situations of water scarcity, where demand exceeds the level of sustainable use. Assessment of the global use of water resources is hampered by the lack of established standards, and conventional measurements may yield diverging results.

In more than 260 trans­boundary watercourses around the world, the closely linked issues of energy, water and agriculture cause difficulties. Tensions between energy-starved Tajikistan and cotton-producing Uzbekistan over the planned Rogun hydro-electric dam illustrate the continuing 'water versus energy' debate. At the same time, the scarcity of water resources in Central Asia is often caused by mismanagement.

Lack of water is expected to affect one-third of the population worldwide by 2025. Today, 1.2 billion people live in areas of scarcity, while 1.6 billion face water shortages due to economic problems. The issue is particularly worrying in least developed countries (LDCs), where water is scarce or there is little or no infrastructure to extract, distribute or conserve water.

The upcoming Blueprint on Europe’s waters triggered the Coordinators of the ENVI Committee to request a study and workshop on the state and challenges of Europe’s waters. The following document is a summary of the proceedings of the workshop. The workshop included presentations and discussions with MEPs and experts on water-management and policy.