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New plant-breeding techniques: Applicability of EU GMO rules

13-11-2020

New plant genetic modification techniques, referred to as 'gene editing' or 'genome editing', have evolved rapidly in recent years, allowing much faster and more precise results than conventional plant-breeding techniques. They are seen as a promising innovative field for the agri-food industry, offering great technical potential. Consumers could benefit from enhanced nutritional quality or reduced allergenicity of food, for example, such as gluten-reduced wheat. There is, however, considerable debate ...

New plant genetic modification techniques, referred to as 'gene editing' or 'genome editing', have evolved rapidly in recent years, allowing much faster and more precise results than conventional plant-breeding techniques. They are seen as a promising innovative field for the agri-food industry, offering great technical potential. Consumers could benefit from enhanced nutritional quality or reduced allergenicity of food, for example, such as gluten-reduced wheat. There is, however, considerable debate as to how these new techniques should be regulated, and whether some or all of them should fall within the scope of EU legislation on genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Those who take the view that the new techniques should be exempt from GMO legislation generally argue that the end product is very similar to products generated using conventional breeding techniques, or that similar changes could also occur naturally. Those who consider that the new techniques should fall within the scope of GMO legislation contend that the processes used mean that plants bred using the new techniques are in fact genetically modified. In July 2018, the Court of Justice of the European Union ruled that genome-edited organisms fall under the scope of European GMO legislation. While welcomed by some, the judgment also sparked criticism and calls for the new European Commission to amend EU GMO legislation. In November 2019, the Council requested that the Commission submit a study in light of the Court of Justice judgment regarding the status of novel genomic techniques (NGTs), by 30 April 2021. This is an updated edition of an October 2019 Briefing.

What if crop protection were environment-friendly?

11-02-2020

Pesticides are indispensable in modern agriculture, but the EU wants crop protection to be responsible and eco-friendly. What options are there to reduce the use of synthetic pesticides?

Pesticides are indispensable in modern agriculture, but the EU wants crop protection to be responsible and eco-friendly. What options are there to reduce the use of synthetic pesticides?

Commitments made at the hearing of Stella KYRIAKIDES, Commissioner-designate - Health

22-11-2019

The commissioner-designate, Stella Kyriakides, appeared before the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety Committee of the European Parliament on 01 October 2019 to answer MEPs’ questions. During the hearing, she made a number of oral commitments which are highlighted in this document. These commitments refer to her portfolio, as described in the mission letter sent to her by Ursula von der Leyen, President-elect of the European Commission, including "protecting and promoting public health" and ...

The commissioner-designate, Stella Kyriakides, appeared before the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety Committee of the European Parliament on 01 October 2019 to answer MEPs’ questions. During the hearing, she made a number of oral commitments which are highlighted in this document. These commitments refer to her portfolio, as described in the mission letter sent to her by Ursula von der Leyen, President-elect of the European Commission, including "protecting and promoting public health" and "food safety and animal and plant health".

New plant-breeding techniques: Applicability of EU GMO rules

10-10-2019

New plant genetic modification techniques, referred to as 'gene editing' or 'genome editing', have evolved rapidly in recent years, allowing much faster and more precise results than conventional plant-breeding techniques. They are seen as a promising innovative field for the agri-food industry, offering great technical potential. There is, however, considerable debate as to how these new techniques should be regulated, and whether some or all of them should fall within the scope of EU legislation ...

New plant genetic modification techniques, referred to as 'gene editing' or 'genome editing', have evolved rapidly in recent years, allowing much faster and more precise results than conventional plant-breeding techniques. They are seen as a promising innovative field for the agri-food industry, offering great technical potential. There is, however, considerable debate as to how these new techniques should be regulated, and whether some or all of them should fall within the scope of EU legislation on genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Those who take the view that the new techniques should be exempt from GMO legislation generally argue that the end product is very similar to products generated using conventional breeding techniques, or that similar changes could also occur naturally. Those who consider that the new techniques should fall within the scope of GMO legislation contend that the processes used mean that plants bred using the new techniques are in fact genetically modified. In July 2018, the European Court of Justice gave a judgment ruling that genome-edited organisms fall under the scope of European GMO legislation. While welcomed by some, the judgment has also sparked criticism and calls for the new European Commission to amend EU GMO legislation. This is an updated edition of a 2016 Briefing.

Hearings of the Commissioners-designate: Stella Kyriakides - Health

26-09-2019

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication ...

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication skills'. At the end of the hearings process, Parliament votes on the proposed Commission as a bloc, and under the Treaties may only reject the entire College of Commissioners, rather than individual candidates. The Briefing provides an overview of key issues in the portfolio areas, as well as Parliament's activity in the last term in that field. It also includes a brief introduction to the candidate.

EU authorisation procedure for pesticides

10-01-2019

In the wake of controversy over the renewal of the approval of glyphosate, the European Parliament set up in February 2018 a special committee on the Union's authorisation procedure for pesticides. The Parliament is expected to vote in plenary on the special committee's recommendations in January 2019.

In the wake of controversy over the renewal of the approval of glyphosate, the European Parliament set up in February 2018 a special committee on the Union's authorisation procedure for pesticides. The Parliament is expected to vote in plenary on the special committee's recommendations in January 2019.

Implementation of pesticides legislation

05-09-2018

Against the backdrop of ongoing controversy regarding the approval of glyphosate, the European Parliament is expected to vote on a report on the implementation of EU legislation on plant protection products in September.

Against the backdrop of ongoing controversy regarding the approval of glyphosate, the European Parliament is expected to vote on a report on the implementation of EU legislation on plant protection products in September.

Renewing the approval for glyphosate

23-10-2017

Glyphosate, one of the world's most widely used active substances in herbicides, has recently become the subject of controversy. The European Commission now proposes to renew its approval for 10 years. The ENVI committee has adopted a motion for a resolution calling for glyphosate to be phased out by 2020, and a vote on this issue is expected during the October II plenary session.

Glyphosate, one of the world's most widely used active substances in herbicides, has recently become the subject of controversy. The European Commission now proposes to renew its approval for 10 years. The ENVI committee has adopted a motion for a resolution calling for glyphosate to be phased out by 2020, and a vote on this issue is expected during the October II plenary session.

Parliament rejects criteria for endocrine disruptors

12-10-2017

On 4 October 2017, the European Parliament voted to object to the European Commission's draft regulation setting out criteria for identifying endocrine disruptors in the area of plant protection products (PPPs). The vote followed the Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) backing a motion for resolution to reject the criteria. The Commission says it needs now to reflect on the next steps to take.

On 4 October 2017, the European Parliament voted to object to the European Commission's draft regulation setting out criteria for identifying endocrine disruptors in the area of plant protection products (PPPs). The vote followed the Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) backing a motion for resolution to reject the criteria. The Commission says it needs now to reflect on the next steps to take.

Agreement on criteria for endocrine disruptors

11-07-2017

On 4 July 2017, the European Commission's Standing Committee on Plants, Animals, Food and Feed (SC PAFF), made up of experts from the EU Member States, voted on the Commission's draft regulation setting out criteria for identifying endocrine disruptors in the area of plant protection products (PPPs). The vote was preceded by several meetings in which the Commission presented revised versions of its drafts. The European Parliament and the Council of the EU now have three months to examine the agreed ...

On 4 July 2017, the European Commission's Standing Committee on Plants, Animals, Food and Feed (SC PAFF), made up of experts from the EU Member States, voted on the Commission's draft regulation setting out criteria for identifying endocrine disruptors in the area of plant protection products (PPPs). The vote was preceded by several meetings in which the Commission presented revised versions of its drafts. The European Parliament and the Council of the EU now have three months to examine the agreed text.

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