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Migrant seasonal workers in the European agricultural sector

26-02-2021

The EU fruit and vegetable sector is heavily dependent on a non-national labour force, either from other EU Member States or third countries. Germany, Italy, Spain, France and Poland, in particular, employ high numbers of migrant seasonal farm workers. While these numbers have been steadily increasing, they compensate only partly for the ongoing decline in national agricultural workforces. Migrant seasonal workers from the EU are entitled to fully equal treatment with nationals of the host country ...

The EU fruit and vegetable sector is heavily dependent on a non-national labour force, either from other EU Member States or third countries. Germany, Italy, Spain, France and Poland, in particular, employ high numbers of migrant seasonal farm workers. While these numbers have been steadily increasing, they compensate only partly for the ongoing decline in national agricultural workforces. Migrant seasonal workers from the EU are entitled to fully equal treatment with nationals of the host country under the fundamental right to the free movement of workers within the EU, whereas third-country nationals are covered by the Seasonal Workers Directive of 2014, which grants them equal treatment as regards terms of employment and some social benefits. EU Member States manage their own seasonal worker schemes depending on the needs of the domestic labour market, their ties with third countries and their broader immigration system. The reality of seasonal agricultural work is a harsh one, with generally poor working and living conditions. Undocumented migrants, but also legal ones, can fall victim to illegal gang-master practices or even modern forms of slavery. Exploitation of women occurs in certain regions. The coronavirus pandemic, which disrupted harvests in the spring of 2020 as seasonal workers faced travel restrictions, also highlighted their essential role in EU agriculture and laid bare their sometimes appalling working and living conditions. Reacting to this situation, the European Parliament adopted a resolution on the protection of seasonal workers in June 2020, calling on Member States to ensure proper implementation of the relevant EU legislation and on the European Commission to issue new specific guidelines and propose long-term solutions to fight abusive practices and protect victims. In July 2020, the Commission responded to this call by issuing new guidelines on the protection of seasonal workers in the context of the pandemic, announcing further action, including ongoing work with the European Labour Authority.

New avenues for legal and labour migration - Selected and commented bibliography of research since 2015

06-04-2020

The Commissions Legal Migration Fitness check of March 2019 found the objectives of the EU's legal migration directives still relevant to the EU's needs, but found that it presents a fragmented system which impacts the coherence and effectiveness of the system as a whole. In view of the upcoming LIBE own-initiative report on "New avenues for legal labour migration", this in-depth analysis of Policy Department C presents short summaries of relevant research on the subject since 2015, covering the ...

The Commissions Legal Migration Fitness check of March 2019 found the objectives of the EU's legal migration directives still relevant to the EU's needs, but found that it presents a fragmented system which impacts the coherence and effectiveness of the system as a whole. In view of the upcoming LIBE own-initiative report on "New avenues for legal labour migration", this in-depth analysis of Policy Department C presents short summaries of relevant research on the subject since 2015, covering the role and effects of migration policies, the mobility of third-country nationals in the EU, how to attract international talent to the EU and how to improve integration in the host society.

The impact of the free movement of economically active citizens within the EU

18-12-2019

In recent years employment rates increased for nationals and mobile EU-citizens especially when minimum wages and/or collective agreements were in place. The free movement leads to higher employment, higher productivity and income, and has a positive impact on taxes and social contributions. However, the vocational qualifications are not fully recognized, therefore the potential cannot be used to the full extent.

In recent years employment rates increased for nationals and mobile EU-citizens especially when minimum wages and/or collective agreements were in place. The free movement leads to higher employment, higher productivity and income, and has a positive impact on taxes and social contributions. However, the vocational qualifications are not fully recognized, therefore the potential cannot be used to the full extent.

Awtur estern

Müller, Klaus

Study in Focus: Labour Mobility and recognition

04-09-2019

An overview of the main findings and recommendations of the study "Labour mobility and recognition in the regulated professions" prepared for the Committee on Employment and Social affairs (EMPL).

An overview of the main findings and recommendations of the study "Labour mobility and recognition in the regulated professions" prepared for the Committee on Employment and Social affairs (EMPL).

European Labour Authority

26-08-2019

The rapid increase in the number of Europeans working in a Member State other than their own, the large number of daily cross-border commuters and the need for information on job opportunities and rights at home and abroad have led the European Commission to propose the creation of a European-level coordinating body. The European Labour Authority (ELA) would replace, reorganise, or cooperate with existing structures dealing with information for individuals and employers, mediate between national ...

The rapid increase in the number of Europeans working in a Member State other than their own, the large number of daily cross-border commuters and the need for information on job opportunities and rights at home and abroad have led the European Commission to propose the creation of a European-level coordinating body. The European Labour Authority (ELA) would replace, reorganise, or cooperate with existing structures dealing with information for individuals and employers, mediate between national labour authorities and social security bodies, and gather viable data on posted workers and commuters. According to the final text of the agreement reached between the Council and the Parliament, the main tasks of the ELA will be to facilitate access to information, enhance cooperation, and coordinate and support concerted and joint inspections. Furthermore, the ELA, in cooperation with Member States and social partner organisations, will assess risks and carry out analyses regarding labour mobility and social security coordination. The ELA may also conclude cooperation agreements with other relevant Union agencies. The European Parliament approved the agreement in plenary on 16 April 2019. The Council adopted the act on 13 June 2019 and the final act was signed on 20 June 2019 and entered into force on 31 July 2019. The Authority will become operational with the capacity to implement its own budget by 1 August 2021. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Study in focus: Employment barriers in border regions

15-05-2019

The note summarises key results from a study prepared at reqest of the Employment and Social Affairs Committee. It concludes with a set of policy recommendations including the design of EU funding post-2020.

The note summarises key results from a study prepared at reqest of the Employment and Social Affairs Committee. It concludes with a set of policy recommendations including the design of EU funding post-2020.

Employment barriers in border regions: Strategies and EU funding

15-01-2019

This study draws primarily on available literature, as well as on information gathered from interviews to examine barriers to employment in border regions. The study first outlines cross-border labour mobility trends and drivers. It then looks at barriers to cross-border labour mobility before assessing measures - including legislation, key programmes and initiatives, and funding structures - adopted at EU-level to address them. The study concludes by presenting a series of recommendations on ways ...

This study draws primarily on available literature, as well as on information gathered from interviews to examine barriers to employment in border regions. The study first outlines cross-border labour mobility trends and drivers. It then looks at barriers to cross-border labour mobility before assessing measures - including legislation, key programmes and initiatives, and funding structures - adopted at EU-level to address them. The study concludes by presenting a series of recommendations on ways to facilitate cross-border labour mobility going forward. This analysis has been produced by Policy Department A at request of the EMPL Committee to feed into its work on the European Social Fund Plus.

Brexit and Migration

16-10-2018

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs, at the request of the European Parliament Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE Committee), focuses on the future relationship between the UK and the EU following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU in the field of migration (excluding asylum), including future movement of EU citizens and UK nationals between the EU and UK. Moreover, it investigates the role ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs, at the request of the European Parliament Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE Committee), focuses on the future relationship between the UK and the EU following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU in the field of migration (excluding asylum), including future movement of EU citizens and UK nationals between the EU and UK. Moreover, it investigates the role of the Court of Justice of the EU.

Awtur estern

Carolus Grütters, Elspeth Guild, Paul Minderhoud, Ricky van Oers, Tineke Strik

Social protection in the EU: State of play, challenges and options

11-10-2018

Globalisation, technological change, an aging population and changes to the world of work have made securing social protection for all, i.e. economic and social security, a major challenge. When social protection systems work well, they can have a stabilising effect on the economy and promote socio-economic equality and stability. By contrast, inadequate or ineffective systems can exacerbate inequality. Indeed, improving the existing social protection systems is the priority of half of the principles ...

Globalisation, technological change, an aging population and changes to the world of work have made securing social protection for all, i.e. economic and social security, a major challenge. When social protection systems work well, they can have a stabilising effect on the economy and promote socio-economic equality and stability. By contrast, inadequate or ineffective systems can exacerbate inequality. Indeed, improving the existing social protection systems is the priority of half of the principles of the European Pillar of Social Rights – the European Commission's overarching social field initiative designed to serve as a compass for policies updating current labour market and welfare systems. While implementation of the 'social pillar' remains primarily the responsibility of the Member States, in close cooperation with the social partners, the European Commission has put forward several legislative and non-legislative initiatives to support this process in the area of social protection. These include the proposal for a recommendation on social protection for all, including non-standard workers, responding to calls from the European Parliament and the social partners and stakeholders. This proposal had the difficult task of addressing all the disagreements that had arisen during the two-phase consultation in the preparatory phase. While all parties seem to agree on the importance of adjusting social protection to the new realities of life and work, there are differences of opinion concerning the technicalities, such as the financing of schemes. This is in part a reflection of the current evidence that raises many questions as to the optimal response to the new challenges in very diverse systems of social protection across the Member States. The main trends currently include a combination of social protection and social investment, individualisation of social protection schemes and a potential move towards universal social protection, whereby social protection would be removed from the employment relationship. However, financing these schemes poses a challenge.

Proportionality test for new national regulations for professions

25-07-2018

In the EU, professions are regulated at either Union or Member State level. In the latter case, qualification requirements can differ widely between Member States, due to their respective historical development and experience. This can lead to a lack of clarity on the criteria used, and result in fragmentation of the single market. The proposed directive on a proportionality test before adoption of new regulation of professions, tabled by the European Commission, sought to harmonise the way in which ...

In the EU, professions are regulated at either Union or Member State level. In the latter case, qualification requirements can differ widely between Member States, due to their respective historical development and experience. This can lead to a lack of clarity on the criteria used, and result in fragmentation of the single market. The proposed directive on a proportionality test before adoption of new regulation of professions, tabled by the European Commission, sought to harmonise the way in which proportionality tests are carried out before Member States introduce new regulation on professions. The new directive will supplement provisions of Directive 2005/36/EC on the recognition of professional qualifications, last amended by Directive 2013/55/EU. The European Parliament proposed a specific status for healthcare services, and explicitly addressed gold-plating practices (unnecessary national requirements). A text was agreed between Parliament and Council in trilogue in March, which was voted in the Parliament plenary on 14 June 2018 and adopted by the Council on 21 June 2018. The final act was signed on 28 June 2018. Member States have until 30 July 2020 to bring into force the laws and administrative provisions necessary to comply with the directive. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Avvenimenti fil-ġejjieni

25-10-2021
European Gender Equality Week - October 25-28, 2021
Avveniment ieħor -
FEMM AFET DROI SEDE DEVE BUDG CONT ECON EMPL ITRE TRAN AGRI PECH CULT JURI PETI
25-10-2021
Ninth meeting of the Joint Parliamentary Scrutiny Group on Europol, 25-26 October
Avveniment ieħor -
LIBE
26-10-2021
Investment Policy and Investment Protection Reform
Smigħ -
INTA

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