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European Maritime and Fisheries Fund 2021-2027

06-04-2021

As part of the EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission proposed in June 2018 a regulation to continue the fund dedicated to the Common Fisheries Policy and the Integrated Maritime Policy. On 4 April 2019, Parliament adopted its first reading position on the file. After lengthy interinstitutional negotiations, started after the 2019 elections, political agreement was reached on 4 December 2020. The new fund allows for more flexibility in national programmes. A greater ...

As part of the EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission proposed in June 2018 a regulation to continue the fund dedicated to the Common Fisheries Policy and the Integrated Maritime Policy. On 4 April 2019, Parliament adopted its first reading position on the file. After lengthy interinstitutional negotiations, started after the 2019 elections, political agreement was reached on 4 December 2020. The new fund allows for more flexibility in national programmes. A greater focus on aquaculture is reflected in its inclusion in the name of the fund. A thorny issue in the negotiations was support for investment in fishing vessels, on which the co legislators wanted to go beyond the proposal. The compromise allows aid for vessels up to 24 metres long: support for the first acquisition of a vessel by a young fisherman, the replacement or modernisation of engines, and operations that improve safety, working conditions or energy efficiency. The measures come with restrictive conditions, such as the respect of fishing capacity ceilings. At least 15 % of Member States' allocations should be spent on control and data collection. The agreed text was endorsed by the Committee on Fisheries on 22 February 2021. After adoption by the Council, Parliament is expected to adopt the text and complete the procedure at second reading.

Three critical issues in EU-UK relations

08-06-2020

Following the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) on 1 February 2020, the EU and the UK launched negotiations on a new partnership agreement, to come into effect at the end of the transition period, scheduled for 31 December 2020. The negotiations are intended to address nearly all the domains covered in the Political Declaration negotiated by both parties alongside the Withdrawal Agreement, including trade and economics, fisheries, thematic cooperation, and internal ...

Following the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) on 1 February 2020, the EU and the UK launched negotiations on a new partnership agreement, to come into effect at the end of the transition period, scheduled for 31 December 2020. The negotiations are intended to address nearly all the domains covered in the Political Declaration negotiated by both parties alongside the Withdrawal Agreement, including trade and economics, fisheries, thematic cooperation, and internal and external security. As far as negotiations on the future economic relationship are concerned, while the parties agree in principle on an exceptional zero-tariff and zero-quota comprehensive and balanced free trade agreement (FTA) aiming for as 'frictionless' trade as possible, they still disagree on major aspects of the economic partnership, especially fisheries and level playing-field (LPF) commitments. The EU wants the future agreement in the fisheries domain to retain the status quo as far as possible, including reciprocal access to waters in return for access to markets and quota-shares that are based on historical fishing patterns. The EU also insists that an effective LPF would ensure fair competition. After the third round of talks, which took place in May 2020, the UK's chief negotiator, David Frost, said that the EU proposal on fisheries was ‘simply not realistic’, and it was unacceptable that the LPF binds the UK to EU law or standards; if need be, the UK would aim for a less ambitious FTA. The EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, said that negotiating an FTA providing for tariffs would be far more time-consuming, and the EU would still demand the same LPF commitments because 'open and fair competition is not a "nice-to-have", it is a "must-have" '. Following the fourth round of negotiations, from 2 to 5 June, the positions therefore still seemed irreconcilable. However, the long stand-off in the earlier negotiations on UK withdrawal had seemed equally irreconcilable before the final agreement was reached and then ratified. One area in which the two sides did manage to agree in those negotiations is the financial settlement included in the Withdrawal Agreement. While that settlement is now being implemented, it had initially been seen as one of the more difficult areas of the withdrawal negotiations.

Research for PECH Committee - Seafood Industry Integration in all EU Member States with a coastline

18-12-2019

This study researched the drivers and mechanisms of both structural and non-structural horizontal and vertical integration in the seafood industry in all Member States with a coastline. The objective of the study was to identify trends among the Member States. The observed trends generally fall into three broad, inter-linked categories: regulatory environment, natural resources and firm performance.

This study researched the drivers and mechanisms of both structural and non-structural horizontal and vertical integration in the seafood industry in all Member States with a coastline. The objective of the study was to identify trends among the Member States. The observed trends generally fall into three broad, inter-linked categories: regulatory environment, natural resources and firm performance.

Awtur estern

Ward Warmerdam, Barbara Kuepper, Jeroen Walstra, Mara Werkman, Milena Levicharova, Linnea Wikström, Daniel Skerrit, Laura Enthoven, Robin Davies

Hearings of the Commissioners-designate: Virginijus Sinkevičius - Environment, Oceans and Fisheries

26-09-2019

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication ...

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication skills'. At the end of the hearings process, Parliament votes on the proposed Commission as a bloc, and under the Treaties may only reject the entire College of Commissioners, rather than individual candidates. The Briefing provides an overview of key issues in the portfolio areas, as well as Parliament's activity in the last term in that field. It also includes a brief introduction to the candidate.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Fisheries

28-06-2019

The European Union has sole responsibility for the conservation of its marine fisheries resources, and manages them under the common fisheries policy (CFP). Launched in 1983 and reformed every ten years since then, the CFP has come a long way. The current framework, resulting from the 2013 CFP reform, is aimed at ensuring that EU fisheries are sustainable – environmentally, economically and socially. The CFP has a dedicated financial instrument – the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) – ...

The European Union has sole responsibility for the conservation of its marine fisheries resources, and manages them under the common fisheries policy (CFP). Launched in 1983 and reformed every ten years since then, the CFP has come a long way. The current framework, resulting from the 2013 CFP reform, is aimed at ensuring that EU fisheries are sustainable – environmentally, economically and socially. The CFP has a dedicated financial instrument – the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) – with a budget of €6.4 billion for the 2014-2020 period. The 2013 reform introduced the target to achieve exploitation of all stocks at sustainable levels by 2020, and provided several major tools to support progress towards this goal. In particular, adoption of multiannual plans has become a priority, to ensure long-term management of stocks. An obligation to land all catches was designed to end the practice of discarding fish back into the sea. The reform also introduced regionalisation of decision-making, with the possibility to adopt conservation measures based on joint recommendations by the Member States concerned. Implementation of the reformed CFP was the main feature of the 2014-2019 parliamentary term, with legislative work making headway on several important topics. A series of multiannual plans have been launched, and four of them, concerning fisheries in the Baltic Sea, the North Sea, the Western Waters and the western Mediterranean, are now in force. The landing obligation has been phased in, as scheduled, from 2015 to 2019. The EU adopted an updated framework for collection of fisheries data to support management decisions, as well as a new system of fishing authorisations improving the monitoring of EU vessels fishing outside EU waters. EU activities have also covered different aspects of the CFP's external dimension, such as conclusion of fisheries agreements with third countries, and participation in international fisheries governance. In the future, further progress is expected on issues such as adoption of multiannual plans and the revision of the fisheries control system. The EMFF will be renewed as part of the next EU multiannual budget for 2021-2027. Taking stock of progress made in implementing the latest reform and achieving its objectives, with a view to future CFP developments, will also be on the agenda. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

European Maritime and Fisheries Fund 2021-2027

21-01-2019

The 2021-2027 European Maritime and Fisheries Fund is the major financial tool supporting the EU common fisheries policy (CFP). The new EMFF is focused “on evolution rather than radical changes” - and is supposed to be simpler and more flexible for the stakeholders involved. The notes on quality, research and analysis of the impact assessment concluded that the range of options, the scope and analysis of impacts, and the stakeholder consultation seem to be not always in line with the Better Regulation ...

The 2021-2027 European Maritime and Fisheries Fund is the major financial tool supporting the EU common fisheries policy (CFP). The new EMFF is focused “on evolution rather than radical changes” - and is supposed to be simpler and more flexible for the stakeholders involved. The notes on quality, research and analysis of the impact assessment concluded that the range of options, the scope and analysis of impacts, and the stakeholder consultation seem to be not always in line with the Better Regulation Guidelines for financial programmes.

Research for PECH Committee - Fisheries in Ireland

14-09-2018

This overview of the fisheries sector in the Republic of Ireland (henceforth: Ireland) provides information for the delegation of the PECH committee to the country (Cork, 17-19 September 2018).

This overview of the fisheries sector in the Republic of Ireland (henceforth: Ireland) provides information for the delegation of the PECH committee to the country (Cork, 17-19 September 2018).

Research for PECH Committee - Åland Islands

15-05-2018

The Åland Islands is an autonomous, demilitarised, Swedish-speaking region of Finland. The archipelago has its own government and parliament. The Åland Islands is a small society with an open economy that is dependent on trade with its neighbouring regions, notably Southern Finland and the Stockholm region. In 2017 the Åland Islands had 6 aquaculture facilities operating. The number of employed persons in the aquaculture sector was 95 people in that same year. The number of employed persons in the ...

The Åland Islands is an autonomous, demilitarised, Swedish-speaking region of Finland. The archipelago has its own government and parliament. The Åland Islands is a small society with an open economy that is dependent on trade with its neighbouring regions, notably Southern Finland and the Stockholm region. In 2017 the Åland Islands had 6 aquaculture facilities operating. The number of employed persons in the aquaculture sector was 95 people in that same year. The number of employed persons in the fishing sector in the Åland Islands amounted to 88 persons in 2016.

Plenary round-up – Strasbourg, January 2018

19-01-2018

The January session highlights were the European Council conclusions debate and a presentation of Bulgarian Presidency priorities, as well as the first in a series of debates with EU leaders on the future of Europe, with the Irish prime minister, Leo Varadkar. Parliament voted, inter alia, on three clean energy package proposals; a review of dual-use items export controls; its opinion on the revised Brussels IIa Regulation; and gave its consent for the conclusion of the Marrakesh Treaty.

The January session highlights were the European Council conclusions debate and a presentation of Bulgarian Presidency priorities, as well as the first in a series of debates with EU leaders on the future of Europe, with the Irish prime minister, Leo Varadkar. Parliament voted, inter alia, on three clean energy package proposals; a review of dual-use items export controls; its opinion on the revised Brussels IIa Regulation; and gave its consent for the conclusion of the Marrakesh Treaty.

Research for PECH Committee - Regional ocean governance in Europe: the role of fisheries

15-08-2017

This study requested by the European Parliament (PECH Committee) ex-amines regional ocean governance in the European regional seas in the context of fisheries. It assesses key regional organisations (the Regional Fisheries Management Organisations (RFMOs) and Regional Seas Con-ventions (RSCs)) examining the mechanisms by which they cooperate and coordinate as well as their outcomes, within the context of EU policy.

This study requested by the European Parliament (PECH Committee) ex-amines regional ocean governance in the European regional seas in the context of fisheries. It assesses key regional organisations (the Regional Fisheries Management Organisations (RFMOs) and Regional Seas Con-ventions (RSCs)) examining the mechanisms by which they cooperate and coordinate as well as their outcomes, within the context of EU policy.

Awtur estern

Nienke van der Burgt, Claire Dupont, Roxana Mastor, Sabina Potestio, Nina Smith and Sophie Vancauwenbergh

Avvenimenti fil-ġejjieni

07-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: What is the future of (European) sovereignty?
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS
08-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Statistics, Data and Trust: Why figures matter [...]
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS
21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Matters of Record: Inside European Politics
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS

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