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Detecting and protecting victims of trafficking in hotspots

15-07-2019

This study focuses on the issue of trafficking in human beings in the specific context of hotspots. It analyses the processes in place to facilitate the detection of victims when they arrive by sea on Greek and Italian shores, as well as the protection they are granted.

This study focuses on the issue of trafficking in human beings in the specific context of hotspots. It analyses the processes in place to facilitate the detection of victims when they arrive by sea on Greek and Italian shores, as well as the protection they are granted.

Victims of trafficking in hotspots

21-02-2019

This briefing looks at the risks of exploitation faced by people leaving their countries in search of safety or better lives and arriving in Europe by sea. It gives an overview of the processes related to early identification of victims of trafficking in first reception facilities (hotspots) and the related challenges.

This briefing looks at the risks of exploitation faced by people leaving their countries in search of safety or better lives and arriving in Europe by sea. It gives an overview of the processes related to early identification of victims of trafficking in first reception facilities (hotspots) and the related challenges.

FEMM Mission to Italy - 17-19 December 2018

13-12-2018

The FEMM Committee requested the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs to provide a briefing for a mission to Italy (17-19 December 2018). The focus of this FEMM mission is on conscientious objection to abortion in Italy and the trafficking of migrant women for prostitution in Italy. This briefing provides background information on both subjects.

The FEMM Committee requested the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs to provide a briefing for a mission to Italy (17-19 December 2018). The focus of this FEMM mission is on conscientious objection to abortion in Italy and the trafficking of migrant women for prostitution in Italy. This briefing provides background information on both subjects.

Combating sexual abuse of children

05-12-2017

Directive 2011/93/EU on combating the sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography, adopted in December 2011, establishes minimum standards for the definition of, and sanctions for, such criminal offences, as well as provisions to strengthen the prevention of those crimes and the protection of victims. During the December plenary session, the Parliament is due to debate a report on the implementation of the directive.

Directive 2011/93/EU on combating the sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography, adopted in December 2011, establishes minimum standards for the definition of, and sanctions for, such criminal offences, as well as provisions to strengthen the prevention of those crimes and the protection of victims. During the December plenary session, the Parliament is due to debate a report on the implementation of the directive.

Implementation of the Directive on Human Trafficking from a gender perspective

02-05-2016

In 2011, the European Parliament and the Council adopted Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings (THB) and protecting its victims. The European Commission was required to report to the Parliament and Council by 6 April 2015 on Member State compliance with the Directive, which had to be transposed into national law by 6 April 2013. At its May plenary session the Parliament will vote on an own-initiative report on implementation of the Directive from a gender perspective ...

In 2011, the European Parliament and the Council adopted Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings (THB) and protecting its victims. The European Commission was required to report to the Parliament and Council by 6 April 2015 on Member State compliance with the Directive, which had to be transposed into national law by 6 April 2013. At its May plenary session the Parliament will vote on an own-initiative report on implementation of the Directive from a gender perspective.

Trafficking in Human Beings from a Gender Perspective (Directive 2011/36/EU): European Implementation Assessment

29-04-2016

Trafficking in human beings (THB), in all its forms, is a serious crime affecting fundamental rights, health, social life, economy and justice. THB knows no boundaries and most reported victims are female EU nationals from Central and Eastern Europe. THB can be tackled effectively only through a coherent approach at the levels of legislation and executive powers and through strategic policy-making. Proper investigation and prosecution are important and enhance victim protection and assistance as ...

Trafficking in human beings (THB), in all its forms, is a serious crime affecting fundamental rights, health, social life, economy and justice. THB knows no boundaries and most reported victims are female EU nationals from Central and Eastern Europe. THB can be tackled effectively only through a coherent approach at the levels of legislation and executive powers and through strategic policy-making. Proper investigation and prosecution are important and enhance victim protection and assistance as well as prevention. However, taking into account the gender dimension of THB is essential to ensure adequate support for the victims as well as effective prevention. The 2011 EU Anti-Trafficking Directive represents a landmark piece of legislation in that respect. The Ex-Post Impact Assessment Unit of the European Parliament has asked several groups of experts to analyse the implementation and application of the Directive, from a gender perspective, in 12 Member States: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Romania, Sweden, the UK and Spain. The contributions received point to an uneven implementation of the Directive's requirements across the EU Member States. The findings emphasise the need to improve the identification of victims, which is key for granting them protection, to establish better training on the gender aspects of the different forms of human trafficking for front-line officers, to enhance cooperation between public administration and competent NGOs, and to expand prevention via public awareness campaigning.

Awtur estern

- Denise Charlton and Nusha Yonkova, on Ireland; - Josie Christodoulou, on Cyprus and Greece; - Ryszard Piotrowicz, Bärbel Uhl, Klara Skrivankova, Marjan Wijers, on Germany, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Romania, Sweden and the UK; - Venla Roth, on Finland; - Genoveva Tisheva and Nusha Yonkova, on Bulgaria; - Viviana Waisman and Gema Fernandez Rodriguez de Liévana, on Spain.

The gender dimension of human trafficking

08-02-2016

Human trafficking is a serious crime and a violation of human rights. It is on the rise due to increasing mobility, the development of new technologies and the generally low risks and high profit involved. Data on the prevalence of this crime show that the majority of its victims are women and girls. Sexual exploitation is by far the first purpose of trafficking in women. Most trafficked women are forced into commercial sexual services while many are also victims of domestic servitude. There are ...

Human trafficking is a serious crime and a violation of human rights. It is on the rise due to increasing mobility, the development of new technologies and the generally low risks and high profit involved. Data on the prevalence of this crime show that the majority of its victims are women and girls. Sexual exploitation is by far the first purpose of trafficking in women. Most trafficked women are forced into commercial sexual services while many are also victims of domestic servitude. There are several factors which contribute to trafficking in women. Their vulnerability, especially as a consequence of violence, and the demand for their sexual services are two leading factors which have received increased attention in recent years. Tackling this demand requires addressing prostitution. EU Member States have adopted different approaches to this phenomenon, ranging from criminalisation of all activities related to prostitution to regulation. Traffickers operate via various channels of recruitment which involve coercion, force or deception. They usually exploit the poor economic situation of women searching for a better life abroad. The internet and new technologies play an important role, as does migrant smuggling. The EU has adopted key instruments to tackle trafficking in human beings. They are based on a victim-centred approach and recognise that support and protection of victims, as well as prevention should be gender-specific. The European Parliament plays an important part in shaping EU policies in the field.

The Policy on Gender Equality in Netherlands

21-09-2015

At the request of the FEMM Committee, this note provides an overview of the existing gender-equality legislation and policies in the Netherlands, focussing on their recent developments and achievements. It covers a range of topics including participation in decision making and labour market, reconciliation of work and family life, eradication of gender-based violence, and women’s well-being. The Netherlands has a long tradition in emancipation policies and equality legislation. Important policy issues ...

At the request of the FEMM Committee, this note provides an overview of the existing gender-equality legislation and policies in the Netherlands, focussing on their recent developments and achievements. It covers a range of topics including participation in decision making and labour market, reconciliation of work and family life, eradication of gender-based violence, and women’s well-being. The Netherlands has a long tradition in emancipation policies and equality legislation. Important policy issues are the high part-time rate which translates in a relatively low participation rate in full time equivalents and the low share of women in top positions.

Awtur estern

Janneke PLANTENGA and Chantal REMERY

The Policy on Gender Equality in Denmark

07-07-2015

Upon request of the FEMM committee, this in-depth analysis updates a previous note published in October 2011 and describes Danish policies, practices and legislation within the area of women's rights and gender equality, covering the period from October 2011, when the Social Democrat-led government took office, to April 2015. During this period, the focus has been put on gender-based violence, leave policies, pay statistics, gender segregation in the labour market and in education, as well as sexual ...

Upon request of the FEMM committee, this in-depth analysis updates a previous note published in October 2011 and describes Danish policies, practices and legislation within the area of women's rights and gender equality, covering the period from October 2011, when the Social Democrat-led government took office, to April 2015. During this period, the focus has been put on gender-based violence, leave policies, pay statistics, gender segregation in the labour market and in education, as well as sexual and reproductive health and rights. Earmarked leave for fathers and gender quota on company boards have been on the agenda but not adopted.

The Policy on Gender Equality in Germany

15-04-2015

Upon request by the FEMM Committee, this note provides an overview of the gender-equality legislation and policies in Germany, focussing on their recent developments and achievements. It reviews gender equality in decision-making, in employment, reconciliation of private and professional life, strategies to combat violence against women and sexual and reproductive health rights. Germany has achieved some progress in gender equality, mainly in the area of employment. European legislation has acted ...

Upon request by the FEMM Committee, this note provides an overview of the gender-equality legislation and policies in Germany, focussing on their recent developments and achievements. It reviews gender equality in decision-making, in employment, reconciliation of private and professional life, strategies to combat violence against women and sexual and reproductive health rights. Germany has achieved some progress in gender equality, mainly in the area of employment. European legislation has acted as the main driver for legal improvements in equal treatment and anti-discrimination.

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