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Research for REGI Committee - Digital agenda and cohesion policy

15-06-2018

This study provides a critical analysis of the contribution of Cohesion Policy and the European Structural Investment Funds to the Digital Agenda for Europe and the Digital Single Market. Based on the analysis of past and current patterns of ESIF digital investments and selected case studies, this study shows that Cohesion Policy should concentrate where its added value is highest, i.e., on support to the formulation of effective regional digital strategies and on the promotion of partnerships between ...

This study provides a critical analysis of the contribution of Cohesion Policy and the European Structural Investment Funds to the Digital Agenda for Europe and the Digital Single Market. Based on the analysis of past and current patterns of ESIF digital investments and selected case studies, this study shows that Cohesion Policy should concentrate where its added value is highest, i.e., on support to the formulation of effective regional digital strategies and on the promotion of partnerships between relevant stakeholders, at regional level and beyond.

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CSIL: Julie PELLEGRIN, Louis COLNOT supported by: Łukasz ARENDT, Luca BISASCHI, Gelsomina CATALANO, Žilvinas MARTINAITIS, Giorgio MICHELETTI

WIFI4EU - Promotion of internet connectivity in local communities

05-09-2017

The European Commission has launched an initiative aimed at providing free access to fast internet in local communities. The European Parliament is due to discuss and vote on WIFI4EU during its September plenary.

The European Commission has launched an initiative aimed at providing free access to fast internet in local communities. The European Parliament is due to discuss and vote on WIFI4EU during its September plenary.

EU strategy on cooperative intelligent transport systems

31-08-2017

Digital technologies, and systems based on them, are being rapidly introduced in transport all over the world. Cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) in road transport are part of this development, and one element in a wider drive towards vehicle automation. These systems use technologies allowing road vehicles to communicate with other vehicles or road users and roadside infrastructure. By increasing the quality and reliability of information, C-ITS can improve road safety and traffic ...

Digital technologies, and systems based on them, are being rapidly introduced in transport all over the world. Cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) in road transport are part of this development, and one element in a wider drive towards vehicle automation. These systems use technologies allowing road vehicles to communicate with other vehicles or road users and roadside infrastructure. By increasing the quality and reliability of information, C-ITS can improve road safety and traffic efficiency as well as reduce energy consumption and emissions from transport, provided that cyber security and data protection are ensured. The European Commission has put forward a strategy outlining the path towards commercial deployment of C-ITS in the EU by 2019, seeking to avoid market fragmentation and maintain EU competitiveness. The main steps proposed are to adopt a legal framework for providing investors with legal certainty, to make EU funding available for projects, and to continue cooperation with EU stakeholders and international partners. The strategy addresses key issues such as data protection and cyber-security, systems interoperability and technical specifications. In the meantime, several ongoing pilot projects are consolidating the experience to be shared. The European Parliament, a long-time supporter of C-ITS and defender of personal data protection, is preparing a report on the strategy.

Ten more technologies which could change our lives

14-07-2017

In 2015, the European Parliament's Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) broke new ground with its publication 'Ten technologies which could change our lives – potential impacts and policy implications', with each chapter highlighting a particular technology, its promises and potential negative consequences, and the role that the European Parliament could and should play in shaping these developments. This new study continues this work, presenting ten additional technologies ...

In 2015, the European Parliament's Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) broke new ground with its publication 'Ten technologies which could change our lives – potential impacts and policy implications', with each chapter highlighting a particular technology, its promises and potential negative consequences, and the role that the European Parliament could and should play in shaping these developments. This new study continues this work, presenting ten additional technologies that will increasingly require the attention of policy-makers. The topics for the current study have been chosen to reflect the wide range of topics that the Parliament's Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) Panel has decided to focus upon for the eighth parliamentary term (2014-2019). The aim of the publication is not only to draw attention to these ten particular technologies, but also to promote further reflection about other technological developments that may still be at an early stage but that could, in a similar way, massively impact our lives in the short- or longer-term future.

New radio frequencies for mobile internet services

03-07-2017

While radio spectrum management is predominantly a national competence, EU policy plays an increasingly important role in its coordination and harmonisation. The EU actively seeks ways to harmonise use of the different bands of the spectrum to meet the ever-growing demand for wireless mobile broadband. Nevertheless, spectrum allocation in the EU remains fragmented and varies among Member States. Following developments in the international framework, as well as the considerations of high-level expert ...

While radio spectrum management is predominantly a national competence, EU policy plays an increasingly important role in its coordination and harmonisation. The EU actively seeks ways to harmonise use of the different bands of the spectrum to meet the ever-growing demand for wireless mobile broadband. Nevertheless, spectrum allocation in the EU remains fragmented and varies among Member States. Following developments in the international framework, as well as the considerations of high-level expert groups and a public consultation, the Commission adopted a long-term strategy for use of the 470-790 MHz frequency band. The strategy proposes to repurpose the 694-790 MHz band, to use it for wireless broadband rather than television broadcasting. The latter is to have priority in the 470-694 MHz band. Under the agreement among the co-legislators, Member States will reassign the 694-790 MHz band by 30 June 2020. This reallocation may be delayed by up to two years in duly justified cases, examples of which are given in the agreed text. Broadcasting services will maintain priority in 470-694 MHz band at least until 2030, but the Member States will have certain flexibility to use this range for other purposes. This updates an earlier edition, of December 2016: PE 595.856.

Internet for growth competitiveness and cohesion: European gigabit society and 5G

24-05-2017

In response to the Commission’s European gigabit society communication, the Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) Committee of the European Parliament has adopted an own-initiative report, due to be discussed in plenary in May. It calls for European global leadership in 5G, the next generation of wireless communication. Due to be available in 2020, 5G is expected to enable an array of new innovative services that will transform sectors such as manufacturing, energy, automotive, and health, bringing ...

In response to the Commission’s European gigabit society communication, the Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) Committee of the European Parliament has adopted an own-initiative report, due to be discussed in plenary in May. It calls for European global leadership in 5G, the next generation of wireless communication. Due to be available in 2020, 5G is expected to enable an array of new innovative services that will transform sectors such as manufacturing, energy, automotive, and health, bringing them into the era of the internet of things.

Optimal Regulatory Model for Telecommunications Services in the EU

15-02-2017

This report reviews the market trends for the development of digital networks and applications for 2020 and beyond and, on that basis, proposes a framework for an optimal regulation for telecommunications services in the European Union. Against that framework, the report then critically assesses the draft European Electronic Communications Code proposed by the Commission in September 2016. We submit that the Commission’s proposal goes in the right direction but in not ambitious enough to protect ...

This report reviews the market trends for the development of digital networks and applications for 2020 and beyond and, on that basis, proposes a framework for an optimal regulation for telecommunications services in the European Union. Against that framework, the report then critically assesses the draft European Electronic Communications Code proposed by the Commission in September 2016. We submit that the Commission’s proposal goes in the right direction but in not ambitious enough to protect the EU consumers in the App economy and to stimulate the digital single market. We think that universal service should ensure an extensive availability of Wi-Fi connections throughout the EU and that citizens need to be protected by general consumer protection rules that are smarter and better enforced instead of detailed and complicated sector-specific rules. This paper was prepared at the request of Policy Department A and the IMCO Committee.

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Alexandre de STREEL (University of Namur and CERRE – Centre on Regulation in Europe) and Christian HOCEPIED (University of Namur)

The European Electronic Communications Code and the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communication (BEREC)

23-01-2017

Overall, the IA presents a comprehensive and well-researched explanation of the evidence base of the legislative proposals. However, the nature of the proposals (one of them being a recast of four existing directives) has posed an obvious challenge in terms of keeping the report concise and readable. The IA clearly exceeds the length recommended in the better regulation guidelines. The report presents stakeholder views well, although the consultation itself focused more on the review process in general ...

Overall, the IA presents a comprehensive and well-researched explanation of the evidence base of the legislative proposals. However, the nature of the proposals (one of them being a recast of four existing directives) has posed an obvious challenge in terms of keeping the report concise and readable. The IA clearly exceeds the length recommended in the better regulation guidelines. The report presents stakeholder views well, although the consultation itself focused more on the review process in general than on the specific options for future policy. Finally, the overly general presentation of monitoring instruments represents a significant shortcoming of the report, especially given the importance of effective monitoring mechanisms in assessing the implementation of legislation.

New radio frequencies for mobile internet services

15-12-2016

While radio spectrum management is predominantly a national competence, EU policy plays an increasingly important role in its coordination and harmonisation. The EU actively seeks ways to harmonise use of the different bands of the spectrum to meet the ever-growing demand for wireless mobile broadband. Nevertheless, spectrum allocation in the EU remains fragmented and varies among Member States. Following developments in the international framework, as well as the considerations of high-level expert ...

While radio spectrum management is predominantly a national competence, EU policy plays an increasingly important role in its coordination and harmonisation. The EU actively seeks ways to harmonise use of the different bands of the spectrum to meet the ever-growing demand for wireless mobile broadband. Nevertheless, spectrum allocation in the EU remains fragmented and varies among Member States. Following developments in the international framework, as well as the considerations of high-level expert groups and a public consultation, the Commission adopted a long-term strategy for use of the 470-790 MHz frequency band. The strategy proposes to repurpose the 694-790 MHz band, to use it for wireless broadband rather than television broadcasting. The latter is to have priority in the 470-694 MHz band. The ITRE Committee report proposes that the deadline for national roadmaps is extended to 30 June 2018, that the 470-694 MHz band can be used by broadcasting services until 2030 and that end-users are compensated promptly for the switch. A December agreement with the Council in trilogue needs now to be confirmed. "A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html"

Research for TRAN Committee - Prospects for “Remote” En-Route Air Traffic Services

15-08-2016

Remote tower services, where aircraft at an airport are remote-controlled from a separate location, have been introduced to some airports and are being tested at several others. By reviewing the current and emerging technologies, considering some of the risks associated with these technologies and evaluating the contribution of the NextGen and SESAR programmes, this paper aims to assess the feasibility of also providing “remote” en-route Air Traffic Services in Europe.

Remote tower services, where aircraft at an airport are remote-controlled from a separate location, have been introduced to some airports and are being tested at several others. By reviewing the current and emerging technologies, considering some of the risks associated with these technologies and evaluating the contribution of the NextGen and SESAR programmes, this paper aims to assess the feasibility of also providing “remote” en-route Air Traffic Services in Europe.

Awtur estern

Stephen Wainwright and Rosie Offord, Mark Scott (Steer Davies Gleave)

Avvenimenti fil-ġejjieni

07-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: What is the future of (European) sovereignty?
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS
08-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Statistics, Data and Trust: Why figures matter [...]
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS
21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Matters of Record: Inside European Politics
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS

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