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Economic Dialogue with the other EU Institutions under the European Semester Cycles during the 9th legislative term - State of play September 2021

09-09-2021

This document provides an overview of Economic Dialogues with the other institutions of the European Union that has taken place in the competent committee(s) of the European Parliament since September 2019 under the European Semester for economic policy coordination. It also lists the Recovery and Resilience Dialogues with the European Commission as undertaken by the competent committee(s) since the entry of force of the Recovery and Resilience Facility in 2021. It also includes an overview of the ...

This document provides an overview of Economic Dialogues with the other institutions of the European Union that has taken place in the competent committee(s) of the European Parliament since September 2019 under the European Semester for economic policy coordination. It also lists the Recovery and Resilience Dialogues with the European Commission as undertaken by the competent committee(s) since the entry of force of the Recovery and Resilience Facility in 2021. It also includes an overview of the respective legal bases for these dialogues.

Discharge for 2019 budget – European Commission, executive agencies and EDFs

21-04-2021

During the April plenary session, the European Parliament is expected to decide on granting discharge for the 2019 financial year to the different institutions and bodies of the European Union (EU). The first item on the agenda of the debate and vote on discharge 2019 is the report covering the European Commission (including six executive agencies) which is in charge of the management of the biggest share of the EU budget. Separate discharge is granted to the Commission concerning the management ...

During the April plenary session, the European Parliament is expected to decide on granting discharge for the 2019 financial year to the different institutions and bodies of the European Union (EU). The first item on the agenda of the debate and vote on discharge 2019 is the report covering the European Commission (including six executive agencies) which is in charge of the management of the biggest share of the EU budget. Separate discharge is granted to the Commission concerning the management of the European Development Funds (EDFs) which are not part of the general budget of the EU as they are established by an intergovernmental agreement. Parliament's Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) recommends that Parliament should grant the Commission and all six executive agencies discharge for 2019. It also recommends granting discharge in respect of the implementation of the operations of the EDFs in 2019.

Understanding the European Commission's right to withdraw legislative proposals

05-03-2021

Although the European Commission exercises its right to withdraw a legislative proposal sparingly, doing so may become a contentious issue, particularly where a legislative proposal is withdrawn for reasons other than a lack of agreement between institutions or when a proposal clearly becomes obsolete – such as a perceived distortion of the purpose of the original proposal. Closely connected with the right of legislative initiative attributed to the Commission under the current Treaty rules, the ...

Although the European Commission exercises its right to withdraw a legislative proposal sparingly, doing so may become a contentious issue, particularly where a legislative proposal is withdrawn for reasons other than a lack of agreement between institutions or when a proposal clearly becomes obsolete – such as a perceived distortion of the purpose of the original proposal. Closely connected with the right of legislative initiative attributed to the Commission under the current Treaty rules, the European Court of Justice issued a judgment on the matter in case C 409/13. The Court spelled out the Commission's power to withdraw a proposal relative to the power of the two co-legislators, and also indicated the limits of this power. In this sense, the Court considers the Commission's power to withdraw proposals to be a corollary of its power of legislative initiative, which must be exercised in a reasoned manner and in a way that is amenable to judicial review. However, the Court's judgment does not solve all the issues connected to this matter. Whilst the judgment develops the Court's arguments along the lines of the current institutional setting, academia has expressed some concern as to whether the judgment is truly in line with the recently emerged push for a higher democratic character in institutional dynamics. The forthcoming Conference on the Future of Europe may provide the opportunity to rethink some of the issues surrounding the exercise of legislative initiative; which remains a matter of a constitutional and founding nature.

Special Advisers to the Commission (2014-2019)

26-02-2021

This study proposes an overview of the selection of Special Advisers to the European Commission, specifically during the period 2014-2019: the procedure followed, number of contracts, safeguards, contractual terms, budgetary implications, transparency, communication with the European Parliament. A review of literature, good practices and criteria for assessing the European Commission framework is provided. In conclusion this study makes recommendations on how to further strengthen it.

This study proposes an overview of the selection of Special Advisers to the European Commission, specifically during the period 2014-2019: the procedure followed, number of contracts, safeguards, contractual terms, budgetary implications, transparency, communication with the European Parliament. A review of literature, good practices and criteria for assessing the European Commission framework is provided. In conclusion this study makes recommendations on how to further strengthen it.

Awtur estern

Dr Christoph DEMMKE, Chair Public Management at the University of Vaasa (FI) Margarita SANZ, Blomeyer & Sanz Roland BLOMEYER, Blomeyer & Sanz

Amending the Comitology Regulation

10-12-2020

When adopting implementing acts, the Commission acts under the scrutiny of the Member States (represented in specialised committees and an appeal committee) following mechanisms set out in the Comitology Regulation. In 2017, the Commission proposed amendments to this Regulation, aimed at eliminating 'no opinion' deadlocks in the appeal committee and increasing transparency in the procedure. The European Parliament is expected to vote on the proposal during the December plenary session.

When adopting implementing acts, the Commission acts under the scrutiny of the Member States (represented in specialised committees and an appeal committee) following mechanisms set out in the Comitology Regulation. In 2017, the Commission proposed amendments to this Regulation, aimed at eliminating 'no opinion' deadlocks in the appeal committee and increasing transparency in the procedure. The European Parliament is expected to vote on the proposal during the December plenary session.

Update on recent banking developments

09-12-2020

This briefing gives an update on and summarises recent events and developments in the Banking Union, based on publicly available information. It gives an overview of: 1) the Eurogroup agreement on the backstop to the Single Resolution Fund; 2) the 7th monitoring report on risk reduction indicators; 3) recent European Central Bank publications, namely the Financial Stability Review and guidance on climate- related and environmental risks; 4) recent Single Resolution Board publications, specifically ...

This briefing gives an update on and summarises recent events and developments in the Banking Union, based on publicly available information. It gives an overview of: 1) the Eurogroup agreement on the backstop to the Single Resolution Fund; 2) the 7th monitoring report on risk reduction indicators; 3) recent European Central Bank publications, namely the Financial Stability Review and guidance on climate- related and environmental risks; 4) recent Single Resolution Board publications, specifically its 2021 Work Programme and guidance on bank mergers and acquisitions; and 5) the EBA’s benchmarking exercise of national insolvency regimes.

European Commission work programme 2021

25-11-2020

This briefing, which focuses on legislative initiatives only, is intended as a background overview for parliamentary committees (and their respective secretariats) which are planning their activities in relation to the European Commission work programme for 2021 (CWP 2021), adopted on 19 October 2020. It provides an overview of the CWP 2021 with regard to its structure and key aspects, and includes information on two types of EPRS publications that might be of interest to the relevant committees ...

This briefing, which focuses on legislative initiatives only, is intended as a background overview for parliamentary committees (and their respective secretariats) which are planning their activities in relation to the European Commission work programme for 2021 (CWP 2021), adopted on 19 October 2020. It provides an overview of the CWP 2021 with regard to its structure and key aspects, and includes information on two types of EPRS publications that might be of interest to the relevant committees in their consideration of the upcoming legislative proposals: initial appraisals of Commission impact assessments (provided by the Ex-Ante Impact Assessment Unit, IMPA) and implementation appraisals (provided by the Ex-Post Evaluation Unit, EVAL). The annex to the briefing provides, inter alia, a tentative indication of the committee concerned by the 82 legislative files included in the CWP 2021.

Foresight for resilience: The European Commission's first annual Foresight Report

08-10-2020

The first Annual Foresight Report sets out how foresight will be used in the EU’s work towards a sustainable recovery and open strategic autonomy, Horizon scanning can identify emerging risks and opportunities. Scenario development can tease out potential synergies, for example between green and digital objectives. Dashboards can be used to measure progress towards agreed goals, while a European Foresight Network can enhance the interaction between different levels of governance.

The first Annual Foresight Report sets out how foresight will be used in the EU’s work towards a sustainable recovery and open strategic autonomy, Horizon scanning can identify emerging risks and opportunities. Scenario development can tease out potential synergies, for example between green and digital objectives. Dashboards can be used to measure progress towards agreed goals, while a European Foresight Network can enhance the interaction between different levels of governance.

Open Plan Offices - The new ways of working. The advantages and disadvantages of open office space

30-09-2020

KEY FINDINGS Open office spaces are introduced for the following reason: - Saving costs on real estate. Real estate expenses are the second largest costs for a company. By creating more workplaces in the same amount of square meters costs can be reduced on buildings and maintenance. - Increase communication. If people are in closer proximity from one another and move around freely communication will increase. - Improve team work. As teams are now sharing the same space knowledge sharing will ...

KEY FINDINGS Open office spaces are introduced for the following reason: - Saving costs on real estate. Real estate expenses are the second largest costs for a company. By creating more workplaces in the same amount of square meters costs can be reduced on buildings and maintenance. - Increase communication. If people are in closer proximity from one another and move around freely communication will increase. - Improve team work. As teams are now sharing the same space knowledge sharing will increase both within the same team and across different teams. The following arguments oppose the introduction of open office spaces: - Loss of productivity. Employees are distracted faster because of noise or colleagues moving around. It takes on average 25 minutes to resume a task after distraction. In an open office space employees are distracted faster because of phone calls, people walking by or nearby conversations. - Problems with noise, temperature and fatigue. As said before, noise is one of the main distractions in an open office space. Temperature is managed centrally and it could therefore be too cold of one person and too warm for another. Fatigue is a side effect from noise and temperature and the fact that people have a constant overload of information with the introduction of multiple screens like phone, tablets and computer. - Increase of sickness. As employees are in closer proximity of one another diseases can spread faster. The spread of diseases raise the amount of sick days taken in a company. - Decrease of overall well-being of employees. The main cause for the diminishing of well-being is the level of stress. The idea of being watched all the time increases the levels of stress in an open office space.

Awtur estern

Alexandra Pouwels

The legal nature of Country-Specific Recommendations

17-09-2020

The Country-Specific Recommendations (CSRs) are annually adopted by the Council based on the Commission (COM) proposals within the framework of the European Semester. The CSRs provide integrated guidance on macro-fiscal and macro-structural measures based on the COM assessment of Member States' medium-term budgetary plans and national reform programmes in light of broad policy priorities endorsed by the European Council or adopted by the Council on th basis of the Annual Growth Survey. The Council ...

The Country-Specific Recommendations (CSRs) are annually adopted by the Council based on the Commission (COM) proposals within the framework of the European Semester. The CSRs provide integrated guidance on macro-fiscal and macro-structural measures based on the COM assessment of Member States' medium-term budgetary plans and national reform programmes in light of broad policy priorities endorsed by the European Council or adopted by the Council on th basis of the Annual Growth Survey. The Council also adopts policy recommendations to the euro area as a whole in accordance with Article 136 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) following a COM proposal. Table 1 displays the development of the number of CSRs and the minimum and maximum number per Member State.

Avvenimenti fil-ġejjieni

21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Inside the room - Shaping Europe, 1992-2010
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS
21-09-2021
Putting the 'e' in e-Health
Sessjoni ta' ħidma -
STOA
27-09-2021
Turning the tide on cancer: the national parliaments' view on Europe's Cancer Plan
Avveniment ieħor -
BECA

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