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Evidence for policy-making: Foresight-based scientific advice

25-03-2021

The implementation of foresight routines will help in preparing future policies. Evidence-based foresight practices will ensure that policy-making is trustworthy and future-fit. This paper is partly inspired by the evidence-related policy issues encountered in managing the coronavirus outbreak. The Covid 19 crisis was, and remains, characterised by uncertainties and evidence that change by the hour through progressive insight. Policy-makers had to make decisions that balanced expert advice and presumed ...

The implementation of foresight routines will help in preparing future policies. Evidence-based foresight practices will ensure that policy-making is trustworthy and future-fit. This paper is partly inspired by the evidence-related policy issues encountered in managing the coronavirus outbreak. The Covid 19 crisis was, and remains, characterised by uncertainties and evidence that change by the hour through progressive insight. Policy-makers had to make decisions that balanced expert advice and presumed feasibility and public acceptance. Additionally, new virus- and vaccine-related evidence meant they had – and continue to have to – constantly review measures, in these exceptional times of uncertainties and evolution of insight, when experts' advice was occasionally inconsistent. This briefing first details the role of evidence in the policy ecosystem, with separate sections regarding science for policy and science- and technology-related policy. Subsequently, an evidence-based mechanism is suggested for rapid response during crises or emergencies. The paper concludes with four practical tips for trustworthy policy analysis: (i) seeing the broader picture; (ii) exploring possible biases; (iii) examining the policy issue from different perspectives; and (iv) stress-testing policy options by widely assessing possible impacts of the options considered.

Research for AGRI Committee - The CAP beyond 2020: appraisal of the EC legislative proposals

08-10-2018

On the basis of the European Commission's proposals on the CAP after 2020 published on 1st June, the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development and Policy Department B of the European Parliament have organise a Workshop on the "The Common Agricultural Policy beyond 2020: appraisal of the EC legislative proposals" in October 2018. This Workshop was structured in three parts: 1. The CAP Strategic Plans beyond 2020 : assessing the architecture and governance issues in order to achieve the EU-wide ...

On the basis of the European Commission's proposals on the CAP after 2020 published on 1st June, the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development and Policy Department B of the European Parliament have organise a Workshop on the "The Common Agricultural Policy beyond 2020: appraisal of the EC legislative proposals" in October 2018. This Workshop was structured in three parts: 1. The CAP Strategic Plans beyond 2020 : assessing the architecture and governance issues in order to achieve the EU-wide objectives; 2. The CAP support beyond 2020: assessing the future structure of direct payments and the rural development interventions in the light of the EU agricultural and environmental challenges; and 3. The sectoral approach in the CAP beyond 2020 and possible options to improve the EU food value chain.

Awtur estern

E. Erjavec; M. Lovec; L. Juvancic; T. Sumrada; I. Rac; R.A. Jongeneel; H. Silvis; K. Poppe; T. Garcia Azcarate

Authorisation of pesticides in the EU: With a focus on glyphosate

01-02-2018

In the European Union, plant protection products, often referred to as 'pesticides', are subject to a dual approval process: active substances are approved at European Union (EU) level, provided they meet a number of criteria. Commercial plant protection products containing one or more active substances are subsequently authorised at Member State level if they satisfy certain conditions. A controversy has emerged since 2015 over the renewal of the approval of glyphosate. One of the active substances ...

In the European Union, plant protection products, often referred to as 'pesticides', are subject to a dual approval process: active substances are approved at European Union (EU) level, provided they meet a number of criteria. Commercial plant protection products containing one or more active substances are subsequently authorised at Member State level if they satisfy certain conditions. A controversy has emerged since 2015 over the renewal of the approval of glyphosate. One of the active substances most commonly found in broad-spectrum herbicides in the world, glyphosate is mainly used in agriculture. The controversy started as a result of diverging assessments of its carcinogenicity: the International Agency for Research on Cancer, a branch of the World Health Organization, classified glyphosate as probably carcinogenic to humans, while the European Food Safety Authority found it unlikely to pose a carcinogenic hazard to humans. The European Chemicals Agency later concluded that glyphosate did not classify as a carcinogen. Several national authorities outside the EU also came to the same conclusion. The European Commission eventually renewed the approval of glyphosate for five years in December 2017. The views of stakeholders and Member States on the topic have been strongly divided. The European Parliament has called for phasing out all uses of glyphosate by the end of 2022. Parliament is expected to vote, in February 2018, on the creation of a special committee on the Union's authorisation procedure for pesticides.

Forward-looking policy-making at the European Parliament through scientific foresight

31-08-2017

The European Parliament's Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) Panel, supported by the Scientific Foresight Unit (STOA), decided two years ago to experiment with a process involving scenario development and assessment to explore possible future techno-scientific developments and their potential impacts, while backcasting possible future opportunities and concerns to options available to policy-makers today. This was achieved with the involvement of experts from a variety of backgrounds ...

The European Parliament's Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) Panel, supported by the Scientific Foresight Unit (STOA), decided two years ago to experiment with a process involving scenario development and assessment to explore possible future techno-scientific developments and their potential impacts, while backcasting possible future opportunities and concerns to options available to policy-makers today. This was achieved with the involvement of experts from a variety of backgrounds, together with stakeholders, using a multi-perspective approach. In this setting, various types of possible impacts are explored, which provide the foundations for imagined exploratory scenarios. From these scenarios we can learn about the possible challenges and opportunities arising from them. By communicating these challenges and opportunities to the Members of the European Parliament (MEPs), together with related legal and ethical reflections, the MEPs are provided with potential insights into how to anticipate future policy issues. The MEPs might thus be able to identify options for working towards the most desirable futures and avoiding undesirable futures, and even for anticipating undesirable scenarios. Therefore, foresight-based policy preparation can help the European Parliament stay well prepared for what might lie ahead, allowing informed, anticipatory action.

Foresight ? Contribution to the debate on the future of EU agricultural policy

28-08-2017

Strategic foresight is increasingly being used as a technique to help organisations anticipate and prepare for potential challenges or opportunities. Its application to agricultural and rural development policies is examined in this briefing. A range of relevant foresight studies are identified and examined across a number of elements, covering: the identification of key drivers of change; the nature of the scenarios they present (including the role of technology and precision farming); and food ...

Strategic foresight is increasingly being used as a technique to help organisations anticipate and prepare for potential challenges or opportunities. Its application to agricultural and rural development policies is examined in this briefing. A range of relevant foresight studies are identified and examined across a number of elements, covering: the identification of key drivers of change; the nature of the scenarios they present (including the role of technology and precision farming); and food security as well as the territorial dimensions relating to the future of Europe’s rural areas. These findings are analysed for their implications for future policy-making in respect of EU agriculture and rural development matters. In the field of public policy, there is a growing realisation that the policy process has to address many challenges such as: advancing greater policy integration; identifying and applying the lessons from previous experience of policy implementation; maximising the use of the available evidence base, and considering and adopting a long-term view of the future through forward thinking involving the development of different scenarios. Foresight studies recognise the multi-disciplinary nature of the challenges facing agriculture and the importance of 'interconnected policy-making'. The potential also exists for strategic foresight to be applied at different territorial levels.

European Environment Agency: Mission, governance, output

02-06-2017

The European Environment Agency (EEA) is an agency of the European Union; it was established in 1993 and has its seat in Copenhagen. Its main mission is to provide the EU with objective, reliable and comparable information on the basis of which to conduct environment policy, assess environmental impacts and inform the public about the state of the environment. The Agency's main clients are the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council, as well as its 33 member countries. Its main ...

The European Environment Agency (EEA) is an agency of the European Union; it was established in 1993 and has its seat in Copenhagen. Its main mission is to provide the EU with objective, reliable and comparable information on the basis of which to conduct environment policy, assess environmental impacts and inform the public about the state of the environment. The Agency's main clients are the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council, as well as its 33 member countries. Its main bodies are the Management Board, which sets the main course, the Executive Director, who heads the Agency, and the Scientific Committee, which provides advice. The EEA has a budget of about €50 million and employs about 200 staff. The EEA's work is supported by the European Environment Information and Observation Network (Eionet), which is made up of European topic centres (consortia of organisations with expertise in a given area) and about 1 500 experts from national environmental organisations. The work of the EEA is based on five-yearly multiannual work programmes implemented through annual work programmes. The Agency's flagship publication is the report on the state and outlook of the European environment (SOER), which provides an assessment of the European environment, trends and prospects. Regular evaluations of the Agency and Eionet are programmed to take place every five years. The European Commission is currently carrying out a 'fitness check' evaluation of the two structures, with conclusions expected by the end of 2017. The European Parliament recognises the role of the EEA as a provider of information on the environment. It recently issued a series of recommendations regarding, among other things, transparency, gender balance, indicators and resources.

EU action to combat marine litter

15-05-2017

This report summarises four presentations by experts and discussions which took place at the workshop ‘EU Action to Combat Marine Litter’ held on 3rd May 2017 in the European Parliament in Brussels. The aim was to provide background information to the ENVI Committee’s Members and contribute to their understanding of the need to tackle marine litter and the challenges involved. The Circular Economy Action Plan and Plastics Strategy are recognised as policy windows in addressing this form of pollution ...

This report summarises four presentations by experts and discussions which took place at the workshop ‘EU Action to Combat Marine Litter’ held on 3rd May 2017 in the European Parliament in Brussels. The aim was to provide background information to the ENVI Committee’s Members and contribute to their understanding of the need to tackle marine litter and the challenges involved. The Circular Economy Action Plan and Plastics Strategy are recognised as policy windows in addressing this form of pollution. The workshop and this report has been commissioned by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) of the European Parliament.

Awtur estern

J.-P. Schweitzer, E.Watkins, H.Jones, S. Gionfra

Circular economy: Four proposals on waste

10-03-2017

Wide differences exist between Member States in the treatment of municipal waste (landfilling, incinerating, recycling and composting). As part of a shift towards a circular economy, in 2015 the European Commission put forward four legislative proposals intended to improve waste management in the European Union. First-reading votes on the reports adopted by the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety are scheduled for the March II plenary.

Wide differences exist between Member States in the treatment of municipal waste (landfilling, incinerating, recycling and composting). As part of a shift towards a circular economy, in 2015 the European Commission put forward four legislative proposals intended to improve waste management in the European Union. First-reading votes on the reports adopted by the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety are scheduled for the March II plenary.

Management of the EU external fishing fleet

26-01-2017

Parliament’s vote on a Commission proposal for a revised system of issuing and managing fishing authorisations is scheduled for the first February plenary session. The revision aims to improve monitoring and transparency of the EU external fishing fleet, regardless of the area and the framework in which it operates.

Parliament’s vote on a Commission proposal for a revised system of issuing and managing fishing authorisations is scheduled for the first February plenary session. The revision aims to improve monitoring and transparency of the EU external fishing fleet, regardless of the area and the framework in which it operates.

The European Globalisation Adjustment Fund: European Implementation Assessment

21-03-2016

This European Implementation Assessment aims to provide a detailed overview of a range of official reports and evaluations concerning the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) between 2007 and 2014, namely the Commission's Annual Reports from 2008 through to 2012 on the activities of the EGF, the Report from the Commission on the activities of the EGF in 2013 and 2014, the mid-term review of 2011 and the final ex-post evaluation of the EGF in 2015. For this exercise, the analysis also draws ...

This European Implementation Assessment aims to provide a detailed overview of a range of official reports and evaluations concerning the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) between 2007 and 2014, namely the Commission's Annual Reports from 2008 through to 2012 on the activities of the EGF, the Report from the Commission on the activities of the EGF in 2013 and 2014, the mid-term review of 2011 and the final ex-post evaluation of the EGF in 2015. For this exercise, the analysis also draws on the findings of a European Court of Auditors Special Report, on past EESC and CoR opinions on the EGF, as well as on European Parliament and Member State positions, and on a range of other information sources. This assessment aims to consolidate the main findings of previous evaluations, reports and positions into a presentation of the overall achievements and difficulties recorded with the EGF over the period under review, in order to identify areas for improvement in the activities selected for EGF funding and in the implementation and monitoring of the fund. What is most apparent is that while the fund has clearly benefitted workers being made redundant in large enterprises, particularly the most vulnerable groups, and especially in a select group of Member States, further improvements are needed to ensure that the fund is used across more sectors more evenly, to the greater benefit of SMEs, and also to promote entrepreneurship. Finally, this assessment identifies ways in which the application process and implementation phase could be made more efficient, and suggests various means to better focus monitoring and future evaluations of the EGF.

Avvenimenti fil-ġejjieni

25-10-2021
European Gender Equality Week - October 25-28, 2021
Avveniment ieħor -
FEMM AFET DROI SEDE DEVE BUDG CONT ECON EMPL ITRE TRAN AGRI PECH CULT JURI PETI
25-10-2021
Capacity for proper expenditure controls of the increased budget of the MFF and NGEU
Smigħ -
CONT
25-10-2021
Ninth meeting of the Joint Parliamentary Scrutiny Group on Europol, 25-26 October
Avveniment ieħor -
LIBE

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