Zoeken

Uw resultaten

Resultaat 10 van 29 resultaten

The economic characteristics of the COVID-19 crisis differ from those of previous crises. It is a combination of demand- and supply-side constraints which led to the formation of a monetary overhang that will be unfrozen once the pandemic ends. Monetary policy must take this effect into consideration, along with other pro-inflationary factors, in the post-pandemic era. It must also think in advance about how to avoid a policy trap coming from fiscal dominance. This paper was provided by the Policy ...

In May 2019, the European Parliament and the Council (the co-legislators) adopted the legislative proposals amending the Capital Requirements Directive and Regulation, which establish the prudential framework for financial institutions operating in the EU. The amendments implement the most recent regulatory standards for banks, set at international level ('Basel III framework'). They also address some regulatory shortcomings and aim to contribute to sustainable bank financing of the economy. The ...

This paper assesses the scope for monetary policy in the euro area as it returns to normal financial conditions without support from easy money but with a financial stability objective (whether legislated or not). We find that both financial stability and traditional monetary objectives can be achieved without one limiting the achievement of the other because, in the new normal, the ECB can use new policy tools derived from the regulatory metrics required under the post-crisis macro-prudential framework ...

Liquidity in resolution is one of the unresolved elements of the Single Resolution Mechanism. Currently, with the Single Resolution Fund (SRF) and the Eurosystem, there are two potential sources of liquidity in resolution, which both have clear limitations in use and amounts. Straightforward solutions to give the SRF and/or Eurosystem more firepower in resolution go against the main objectives of the resolution mechanism (i.e. breaking the sovereign-bank nexus and avoiding use of taxpayers’ money ...

Banks deemed to be failing or likely to fail in the banking union are either put into insolvency/liquidation or enter a resolution scheme to protect the public interest. After resolution but before full market confidence is restored, the liquidity needs of resolved banks might exceed what can be met through regular monetary policy operations or emergency liquidity assistance. All liquidity needs that emerge must be met for resolution to be a success. In the euro area, this can only be done credibly ...

The Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON) asked experts to prepare for the Monetary Dialogue session of 24 September 2018 analyses of the risks related to the abundant liquidity and banks’ lending activity. This note, provided by Policy department A, gives an overview of the in-depth analyses prepared by the experts.

This paper assesses the risks facing the euro area banking system, as it returns to normal financial conditions without ECB support. In the first part we argue that risks to bank lending mainly stem from the transmission of external monetary policy effects that may not be aligned with ECB policies. The second part of the paper therefore offers some ideas on the need to moderate spillover effects from outside monetary policies or events. We also review how far new prudential policies, regulatory measures ...

Post-crisis Excess Liquidity and Bank Lending

Uitgebreide analyse 14-09-2018

With the Asset Purchase Program, the European Central Bank has supplied significant amounts of liquidity into the financial system starting from 2015, resulting yet into a new upswing in excess liquidity. The expanded asset purchase programme (APP) program broadly coincided with further cuts in the ECB’s deposit facility rate, which currently stands at -0.4%. Against this background, this note assesses the ECB policy of negative rate on the deposit facility and discusses the associated risks in the ...

Low interest rates and excess liquidity in the euro area, which exceeded €1,900 billion in September 2018, might create financial stability risks. We clarify the notion of excess liquidity and highlight that its current level is primarily the result of European Central Bank asset purchases. Overall, we conclude that financial stability risks in the euro area are low, but increased home bias and housing prices necessitate full attention from macroprudential authorities. Monetary policy tools are anyway ...

During the crisis, the ECB modified its collateral framework to face increased liquidity needs of commercial banks. This has taken two forms: the minimum required rating for different classes of assets has been reduced and the haircut associated to these assets has evolved conditional on the default risks of these assets. The benefits in terms of cushioning a liquidity crisis and enhancing monetary policy transmission have most probably exceeded the costs in terms of riskier central bank balance ...