39

Resulta(a)t(en)

Woord(en)
Publicatietype
Beleidsterrein
Auteur
Zoekterm
Datum

Detailed technical measures for the definitive VAT system

08-02-2019

The common European value added tax (VAT) system was set up in 1967 and reformed in 1993 in order to adapt it to the entry into force of the internal market. Therefore, the existing rules governing intra Community trade, which were intended to be transitory, are now 25 years old. VAT is an important source of revenue for both national governments and the EU budget, but the current system is ill-adapted to the challenges of a modern economy. It presents such problems as vulnerability to fraud, high ...

The common European value added tax (VAT) system was set up in 1967 and reformed in 1993 in order to adapt it to the entry into force of the internal market. Therefore, the existing rules governing intra Community trade, which were intended to be transitory, are now 25 years old. VAT is an important source of revenue for both national governments and the EU budget, but the current system is ill-adapted to the challenges of a modern economy. It presents such problems as vulnerability to fraud, high compliance costs for businesses, and a heavy administrative burden for national authorities. As part of the action plan on VAT, the European Commission adopted a new proposal in May 2018. This proposal would amend the VAT Directive (Directive 2006/112/EC) to introduce the detailed technical measures of the definitive VAT system for the intra-EU business to business (B2B) trade in goods. The present proposal follows another proposal that sets out the basic features of the reform of the common EU VAT system. Some aspects of the previous proposal were taken out of the negotiations to be examined with this one. Second edition of a briefing originally drafted by Ana Claudia Alfieri. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Reform of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund

11-01-2019

The European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) was created in 2006 to finance active labour market policies targeting workers who have lost their jobs because of trade adjustment. The fund was subsequently modified in 2009 to cover major structural changes triggered by the economic and financial crisis. The rules of the EGF are laid down in EU Regulation (EU) No 1309/2013, which stipulates that the fund will continue to be financed until 31 December 2020. In May 2018, the European Commission submitted ...

The European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) was created in 2006 to finance active labour market policies targeting workers who have lost their jobs because of trade adjustment. The fund was subsequently modified in 2009 to cover major structural changes triggered by the economic and financial crisis. The rules of the EGF are laid down in EU Regulation (EU) No 1309/2013, which stipulates that the fund will continue to be financed until 31 December 2020. In May 2018, the European Commission submitted a proposal to reform the EGF and maintain it as a special instrument outside the MFF ceiling. The proposal introduces modifications to the eligibility criteria, the co-financing rules and the mobilisation procedure. The report was voted in the EMPL committee on 27 November 2018, and the report is due to be debated in plenary in January 2019, with a view to finalising Parliament's position for trilogue negotiations. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

More flexible VAT rates

25-10-2018

Value added tax (VAT) is an important source of revenue for national governments and the European Union (EU) budget and, from an economic point of view, a very efficient consumption tax. However, the rules governing value added tax as applied to intra-Community trade are 25 years old and the current common EU VAT system is both complicated and vulnerable to fraud. Businesses doing cross-border trade face high compliance costs and the administrative burden of national tax administrations is also excessive ...

Value added tax (VAT) is an important source of revenue for national governments and the European Union (EU) budget and, from an economic point of view, a very efficient consumption tax. However, the rules governing value added tax as applied to intra-Community trade are 25 years old and the current common EU VAT system is both complicated and vulnerable to fraud. Businesses doing cross-border trade face high compliance costs and the administrative burden of national tax administrations is also excessive. The reform towards the definitive system is planned in several consecutive steps and will take some years. In the meantime, this proposal will amend the VAT Directive (Directive 2006/112/EC) and reform the rules by which Member States set VAT rates. The reform will enter into force when the definitive system is in place; it will give more flexibility to Member States to set VAT rates and will end the current arrangements and their many ad-hoc derogations. Parliament has adopted its non-binding opinion on the proposal, which is now in the hands of the Council. Second edition of a briefing originally drafted by Ana Claudia Alfieri. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

The future partnership between the European Union and the United Kingdom: Negotiating a framework for relations after Brexit

25-09-2018

Following the European Council's additional guidelines of March 2018, the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK) have started discussions on their future relationship after Brexit. The aim is to agree on a political framework for their future partnership by autumn 2018, to be adopted alongside the withdrawal agreement. Conclusion of a treaty or treaties establishing future EU-UK relations will only take place after the UK leaves the Union and becomes a third country. Both parties have expressed ...

Following the European Council's additional guidelines of March 2018, the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK) have started discussions on their future relationship after Brexit. The aim is to agree on a political framework for their future partnership by autumn 2018, to be adopted alongside the withdrawal agreement. Conclusion of a treaty or treaties establishing future EU-UK relations will only take place after the UK leaves the Union and becomes a third country. Both parties have expressed the desire to remain in a close partnership, which would cover several areas including trade and economic matters, internal security, foreign and security policy, and cooperation on defence. This study looks at the respective aims for, and principles underpinning, the negotiations, as expressed publicly to date by each party, and analyses some of the legal constraints and existing practices or precedents shaping EU cooperation with third-country partners. This allows assessment of the possibilities and limits of any future EU-UK partnership, in light of the stated objectives and 'red lines' officially announced, leading to the conclusion that, notwithstanding several common aims, significant divergences still persist with respect to the means of achieving the stated objectives.

The Privacy Shield: Update on the state of play of the EU-US data transfer rules

26-07-2018

The CJEU’s Schrems judgment of October 2015, besides declaring the European Commission’s Decision on the EU-US ‘Safe Harbour’ data transfer regime invalid, has also settled a number of crucial requirements corresponding to the foundations of EU data protection. In less than one year from the CJEU ruling, the Commission had adopted a new adequacy decision in which the new framework for EU-US data transfer, the Privacy Shield (2016), is deemed to adequately protect EU citizens. The main improvements ...

The CJEU’s Schrems judgment of October 2015, besides declaring the European Commission’s Decision on the EU-US ‘Safe Harbour’ data transfer regime invalid, has also settled a number of crucial requirements corresponding to the foundations of EU data protection. In less than one year from the CJEU ruling, the Commission had adopted a new adequacy decision in which the new framework for EU-US data transfer, the Privacy Shield (2016), is deemed to adequately protect EU citizens. The main improvements of the Privacy Shield (over its predecessor), as well as the critical reactions to the new arrangements, are discussed in this paper. The first joint annual review took place in September 2017 on which both the Commission and Article 29 Working Party issued their own reports. Although progress is recognised, a number of concerns remain and new challenges to the Privacy Shield have arisen, among others, from the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica scandal, as pointed out by the European Parliament in its recent resolution.

EYE event - Trade for all: Please fasten your seat belt

16-05-2018

Long-term economic trends have transformed the world trading scene and, as underlined by European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in his 2017 State of the Union address, new challenges make it essential to strengthen the European trade agenda. In line with the 'trade for all' strategy, EU trade policy follows four main objectives: concluding balanced trade agreements, implementing the agreements in force effectively, tackling unfair trade practices and promoting a sustainable approach to ...

Long-term economic trends have transformed the world trading scene and, as underlined by European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in his 2017 State of the Union address, new challenges make it essential to strengthen the European trade agenda. In line with the 'trade for all' strategy, EU trade policy follows four main objectives: concluding balanced trade agreements, implementing the agreements in force effectively, tackling unfair trade practices and promoting a sustainable approach to trade.

EU-US bilateral agreement on prudential measures regarding insurance and reinsurance

22-02-2018

The EU-US agreement on insurance and reinsurance was signed in September 2017. It aims at eliminating some key trade barriers in the sector, in particular collateral and local presence requirements. The agreement also tackles the issue of supervisory authority and exchange of information. The European Parliament is due to vote on giving its consent to the Council for the conclusion of the agreement during its February II plenary session.

The EU-US agreement on insurance and reinsurance was signed in September 2017. It aims at eliminating some key trade barriers in the sector, in particular collateral and local presence requirements. The agreement also tackles the issue of supervisory authority and exchange of information. The European Parliament is due to vote on giving its consent to the Council for the conclusion of the agreement during its February II plenary session.

Policy measures to respond to trade adjustment costs

24-11-2017

Trade liberalisation is generally expected to bring net welfare gains to the domestic economy by reallocating resources to more productive firms or to industries with a comparative advantage. However, these gains are not always distributed evenly and can involve transitional costs for certain firms and workers. Trade adjustment measures are designed to compensate for these costs. The literature proposes mainly active labour policies (including training and other measures for re-employment) for dealing ...

Trade liberalisation is generally expected to bring net welfare gains to the domestic economy by reallocating resources to more productive firms or to industries with a comparative advantage. However, these gains are not always distributed evenly and can involve transitional costs for certain firms and workers. Trade adjustment measures are designed to compensate for these costs. The literature proposes mainly active labour policies (including training and other measures for re-employment) for dealing with these adjustments. Other policies, such as passive labour policies (unemployment benefits), credit financing, housing policies, etc., can also play a role. The EU's main instrument is the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF), which focuses on active labour policies. In the USA, trade adjustment assistance includes assistance for workers as well as firms and farmers. Assessments of these measures have shown some positive results. In both the EU and the USA, the effectiveness of the measures was found to be greater the higher the educational level of workers or, in the case of measures targeting firms, the higher the growth of the industry's market. This would suggest that structural policies (such as education) play a key role. The EGF has tended to target redundancies from big multinational or national champions, and its co-financing rules are less favourable than other funds, leading to uneven use of the fund by Member States and different views with respect to the reforms needed. The Commission is planning to propose improvements to the EGF in the near future. This briefing may be read together with the 2016 European Implementation Assessment on the EGF for the EMPL Committee, and the recent study on Interactions between trade, investment and trends in EU industry: EU regions and international trade.

Customs unions and FTAs: Debate with respect to EU neighbours

07-11-2017

The EU neighbourhood is undergoing deep transformations and this raises debate on how best to establish trade relations with neighbouring partners, like Turkey and the Eastern Partnership countries (such as Ukraine, Moldova and Georgia). Moreover, Brexit will entail the reorganisation of EU-UK relations, which will shake up cross-border trade flows. The EU can negotiate two basic types of trade agreement granting preferential market access to partners’ goods: free trade agreements (FTAs) and customs ...

The EU neighbourhood is undergoing deep transformations and this raises debate on how best to establish trade relations with neighbouring partners, like Turkey and the Eastern Partnership countries (such as Ukraine, Moldova and Georgia). Moreover, Brexit will entail the reorganisation of EU-UK relations, which will shake up cross-border trade flows. The EU can negotiate two basic types of trade agreement granting preferential market access to partners’ goods: free trade agreements (FTAs) and customs unions (CUs). CUs represent a higher level of integration, as the parties decide to harmonise their external trade barriers with the rest of the world. As FTAs do not maintain a single external border, they may result in trade deflection, whereby third countries can 'free ride' on FTA concessions by entering via the least restrictive border. For this reason, FTAs need to discriminate between goods originating in an FTA member and goods from third countries, through the introduction of costly preferential rules of origin (PRoO). Notwithstanding the cost of PRoO, FTAs have been the main type of trade agreements used, while the smaller number of CUs is due to the higher negotiation costs involved. CUs have therefore mainly been considered as a first step towards deeper regional integration. This is why there are ongoing political debates on customs unions in three different contexts: the assessment of the EU-Turkey CU, a CU as a further step in EU-Ukraine trade relations and the issue of the UK's exit from the EU CU as a result of Brexit. This briefing may be read in conjunction with one by Krisztina Binder, Reinvigorating EU-Turkey bilateral trade: Upgrading the customs union (PE 599.319), EPRS, March 2017.

Interactions between trade, investment and trends in EU industry: EU regions and international trade

27-10-2017

This study analyses the interactions between EU and regional trade patterns and the trends in EU manufacturing on the one hand, and the influence of industrial and regional competitiveness factors on trade and industrial developments, on the other. The study specifically reviews theories on the factors behind trade specialisation and the role of trade in growth and inequalities, and links these to regional trade patterns in 13 EU Member States.

This study analyses the interactions between EU and regional trade patterns and the trends in EU manufacturing on the one hand, and the influence of industrial and regional competitiveness factors on trade and industrial developments, on the other. The study specifically reviews theories on the factors behind trade specialisation and the role of trade in growth and inequalities, and links these to regional trade patterns in 13 EU Member States.

Toekomstige activiteiten

05-11-2019
The Art and Craft of Political Speech-writing: A conversation with Eric Schnure
Diverse activiteiten -
EPRS
06-11-2019
Where next for Europe’s economy? The latest IMF European Regional Economic Outlook[.]
Diverse activiteiten -
EPRS
06-11-2019
EPRS Annual Lecture: Clash of Cultures: Transnational governance in post-war Europe
Diverse activiteiten -
EPRS

Partners

Blijf verbonden

email update imageMailberichten

U kunt alles wat verband houdt met het Parlement volgen via ons systeem van mailberichten, waarbij updates rechtstreeks naar uw e-mailadres worden gestuurd. Zo kunt u onder meer op de hoogte blijven van het laatste nieuws over EP-leden, de voorlichtingsdiensten of de Think Tank.

Het systeem is toegankelijk vanop alle webpagina's van het Parlement. Om u te abonneren en updates over de Think Tank te ontvangen, dient u alleen uw e-mailadres in te vullen en aan te geven voor welk onderwerp u belangstelling heeft en hoe vaak (dagelijks, wekelijks of maandelijks) u updates wenst te ontvangen. Om uw aanmelding te bevestigen, klikt u op een link die u via e-mail zal worden toegestuurd.

RSS imageRSS-feeds

Volg al het nieuws en de updates op de website van het Europees Parlement via onze RSS-feed.

Klik op de onderstaande link om uw feed te configureren.