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Demographic Outlook for the European Union 2021

25-03-2021

The demographic situation in the EU-27 has an important influence on a number of areas, ranging from the labour market, to healthcare and pension systems, and education. Recent developments reinforce already existing demographic trends: a strongly ageing population due to lower fertility rates and increasing life expectancy, coupled with a shrinking working-age population. According to research, the coronavirus pandemic has led to slightly higher mortality rates and possibly to lower birth rates, ...

The demographic situation in the EU-27 has an important influence on a number of areas, ranging from the labour market, to healthcare and pension systems, and education. Recent developments reinforce already existing demographic trends: a strongly ageing population due to lower fertility rates and increasing life expectancy, coupled with a shrinking working-age population. According to research, the coronavirus pandemic has led to slightly higher mortality rates and possibly to lower birth rates, mainly owing to economic reasons such as increased unemployment and poverty. This year's edition – the fourth in a series produced by EPRS – of the Demographic Outlook for the European Union focuses on poverty as a global, EU-wide and regional phenomenon, and examines how poverty interacts with demographic indicators (such as fertility and migration rates) or with factors such as the degree of urbanisation. It also observes poverty within different age groups, geographical areas and educational levels. The correlation of poverty and labour market participation and social exclusion is also analysed for different age groups and family types, as well as in the light of the coronavirus pandemic.

Strengthening Minimum Income Protecion in the EU

10-03-2021

This briefing is preceding a broader study on “Fighting poverty and social exclusion (incl. minimum income schemes)” requested by the EMPL committee in view of a possible Union framework on minimum income protection. The briefing provides an institutional perspective on minimum income schemes (MIS) in Member States and their different roles and scope within national social protection systems. It also further examines the EU monitoring framework and points to shortcomings and gaps on the roadway to ...

This briefing is preceding a broader study on “Fighting poverty and social exclusion (incl. minimum income schemes)” requested by the EMPL committee in view of a possible Union framework on minimum income protection. The briefing provides an institutional perspective on minimum income schemes (MIS) in Member States and their different roles and scope within national social protection systems. It also further examines the EU monitoring framework and points to shortcomings and gaps on the roadway to a Union framework on minimum income protection.

Climate change and its impact on mental health

08-12-2020

Climate change health impacts are experienced through direct and indirect pathways. These can take the form of an increase in the frequency and/or severity of extreme weather events such as heatwaves, droughts, floods, and storms which directly may impact health, resulting in heat-related mortality and morbidity, injury and trauma. Indirectly, climate change may impact health through loss of livelihoods, land and property and through interaction with environmental systems. This document was provided ...

Climate change health impacts are experienced through direct and indirect pathways. These can take the form of an increase in the frequency and/or severity of extreme weather events such as heatwaves, droughts, floods, and storms which directly may impact health, resulting in heat-related mortality and morbidity, injury and trauma. Indirectly, climate change may impact health through loss of livelihoods, land and property and through interaction with environmental systems. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request of the committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety.

Externe auteur

Maria NILSSON

Shaping a European Child Guarantee

22-09-2020

The briefing presents data on the problem of child poverty in the European Union followed by an overview of policy initiatives by the Commission, the Council and the European Palriament. It concludes with points from the debate in research on how to shape an effective Child Guarantee. The note covers aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The briefing presents data on the problem of child poverty in the European Union followed by an overview of policy initiatives by the Commission, the Council and the European Palriament. It concludes with points from the debate in research on how to shape an effective Child Guarantee. The note covers aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Impact of coronavirus on EU aid to the most deprived

04-06-2020

Around 24 million people in the EU, or 5.6 % of the population, are 'severely materially deprived'. Fighting poverty and social exclusion is therefore a key priority, and to this end the EU supplements its Member States' aid to those most in need through the Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD), which has a budget of €3.8 billion. Partner organisations selected by the Member States manage this support, providing food (e.g. distribution of food packages and meals) and material assistance ...

Around 24 million people in the EU, or 5.6 % of the population, are 'severely materially deprived'. Fighting poverty and social exclusion is therefore a key priority, and to this end the EU supplements its Member States' aid to those most in need through the Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD), which has a budget of €3.8 billion. Partner organisations selected by the Member States manage this support, providing food (e.g. distribution of food packages and meals) and material assistance (e.g. clothes), or activities to improve inclusion (e.g. better access to support and social services) to those in need. In parallel, the European Social Fund (ESF) remains the broader funding instrument fighting poverty and social exclusion. The coronavirus crisis poses specific risks for the most deprived and unparalleled challenges for the activities supported by the FEAD and the ESF. To safeguard the most vulnerable, and aid workers and volunteers, against the coronavirus disease, emergency measures have been taken to provide them with protective equipment. Changes, launched in April 2020, have sought to adapt the FEAD to the challenging situation. For instance, electronic vouchers have been introduced to deliver food aid and basic material assistance, to reduce the risk of contamination during delivery. Furthermore, FEAD money has been made available for buying protective equipment for those delivering the aid. Yet again, partner organisations and other players involved in the implementation of the FEAD have been enabled to quickly address the additional needs of the most deprived arising from the crisis. During the crisis, the fund will be 100 % EU-financed, including the 15 % normally paid by the Member States. Moreover, to face the acute labour crisis and its social consequences on the most deprived, the EU has taken initiatives to address immediate needs and mitigate negative impacts on employment and social policy, including measures to support the most vulnerable or deprived groups. Since the onset of the pandemic, the European Parliament has been at the forefront of initiatives to protect the most deprived.

Metropolitan regions in EU cohesion policy

02-10-2019

Metropolitan regions currently include three fifths of the EU population – a proportion that is expected to increase in the future. These regions constitute important poles of innovation, research and economic growth, while also offering a wide variety of educational, cultural and professional opportunities to their inhabitants. Nevertheless, metropolitan regions face a number of important challenges. As they are composed of urban, sub-urban and even rural areas, they require a multidimensional policy ...

Metropolitan regions currently include three fifths of the EU population – a proportion that is expected to increase in the future. These regions constitute important poles of innovation, research and economic growth, while also offering a wide variety of educational, cultural and professional opportunities to their inhabitants. Nevertheless, metropolitan regions face a number of important challenges. As they are composed of urban, sub-urban and even rural areas, they require a multidimensional policy approach to help them tackle their complex issues. One of the major issues that metropolitan regions usually face is the lack of an efficient, inter-connected transport system. Environmental pollution, a major problem in many such regions, is inextricably linked to transport (exacerbated by the high number of commuters), high energy consumption and waste creation. Metropolitan regions usually constitute poles of population growth and have to cater for the integration of their newly arrived citizens. In certain cases, the increasing demand for accommodation leads to a lack of affordable housing and an escalation of rental and property prices; this problem has worsened in many urban areas of the European Union in recent years. In addition, although metropolitan regions may be hubs of economic growth, they also house big numbers of poor and homeless people. Yet again, a number of de-industrialised EU metropolitan regions are suffering severe economic losses. The EU is addressing the needs of metropolitan regions through a number of funds and tools, most notably the European structural and investment funds. Other EU instruments, such as the Urban Agenda for the EU also provide opportunities for metropolitan regions.

Fighting child poverty: The child guarantee

16-09-2019

The note covers existing evidence on the volume and nature of child poverty, knowledge on the consequences and effects of child poverty, the known effectiveness of the main social policy approaches to child poverty, assessment of the 2013 Recommendation on Investing in Children and the Child Guarantee. It concludes with suggestions for future priorities for the Guarantee.

The note covers existing evidence on the volume and nature of child poverty, knowledge on the consequences and effects of child poverty, the known effectiveness of the main social policy approaches to child poverty, assessment of the 2013 Recommendation on Investing in Children and the Child Guarantee. It concludes with suggestions for future priorities for the Guarantee.

Externe auteur

Mary Daly, University of Oxford

Member States Progress towards the EU 2020 Targets

21-02-2019

This note prepared by Economic Governance Support Unit gives an overview of the member states progress towards the EU 2020 targets.

This note prepared by Economic Governance Support Unit gives an overview of the member states progress towards the EU 2020 targets.

Social and employment policies in Romania

16-08-2018

This study, requested by the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs, aims to provide an overview of the economic, employment and social inclusion context and recent policies in Romania.

This study, requested by the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs, aims to provide an overview of the economic, employment and social inclusion context and recent policies in Romania.

Externe auteur

Cristina Vasilescu, Istituto per la ricera sociale

Poverty, gender and life cycle: Portraits of poverty in the European Union

30-11-2017

Nearly a quarter of the population in the European Union (23.8 %) were at risk of poverty or social exclusion in 2015. Living conditions, the degree of insecurity and the routes into and out of poverty vary according to age and gender, as well as varying over the course of a lifetime. Children are the most affected population in Europe today, while young people aged between 18 and 24 now represent 10% of those at risk of poverty or social exclusion in the EU. There is little difference between the ...

Nearly a quarter of the population in the European Union (23.8 %) were at risk of poverty or social exclusion in 2015. Living conditions, the degree of insecurity and the routes into and out of poverty vary according to age and gender, as well as varying over the course of a lifetime. Children are the most affected population in Europe today, while young people aged between 18 and 24 now represent 10% of those at risk of poverty or social exclusion in the EU. There is little difference between the sexes at this age, but it is a key difference among older people. The mid-life period is characterised by substantial variations based on gender, family circumstances and/or professional status. Women, single-parent families, large families or low-income workers are, at this point in their lives, more at risk of poverty or social exclusion. Lastly, older people are now simultaneously the least affected by poverty on average, and also among the most vulnerable, in the case of women.

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