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Policy Departments' Monthly Highlights - April 2018

16-04-2018

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

IMO’s challenges on the route to decarbonising international shipping Key Issues at Stake at the 72nd Session of the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 72)

15-03-2018

Despite efficiency improvements, CO2 emissions from international shipping are projected to be two to five times higher in 2050 than in 1990. At the Paris climate conference, countries agreed to limit climate change to well below 2°C. Without considerable contributions of the shipping sector to global mitigation efforts this goal will be much harder to achieve. The main issue at stake at MEPC 72 is the comprehensive IMO Strategy on the reduction of GHG emissions from ships. MEPC 72 will be preceded ...

Despite efficiency improvements, CO2 emissions from international shipping are projected to be two to five times higher in 2050 than in 1990. At the Paris climate conference, countries agreed to limit climate change to well below 2°C. Without considerable contributions of the shipping sector to global mitigation efforts this goal will be much harder to achieve. The main issue at stake at MEPC 72 is the comprehensive IMO Strategy on the reduction of GHG emissions from ships. MEPC 72 will be preceded by a weeklong meeting of the GHG Working Group that will discuss issues relating to this Strategy with the view to adopt the Initial Strategy at MEPC 72.

Externe auteur

Jakob Graichen, Martin Cames, Vanessa Cook

Zeevervoer: verkeers- en veiligheidsvoorschriften

01-11-2017

Verscheidene EU-richtlijnen en -verordeningen hebben de veiligheidsnormen van het zeevervoer de afgelopen jaren aanzienlijk verbeterd. Dat is vooral te danken aan de drie wetgevingspakketten die zijn aangenomen na de scheepsrampen met de Erika en de Prestige.

Verscheidene EU-richtlijnen en -verordeningen hebben de veiligheidsnormen van het zeevervoer de afgelopen jaren aanzienlijk verbeterd. Dat is vooral te danken aan de drie wetgevingspakketten die zijn aangenomen na de scheepsrampen met de Erika en de Prestige.

Key Issues at Stake at the 71st Session of the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 71)

15-06-2017

Despite efficiency improvements, CO2 emissions from international shipping are projected to be two to five times higher in 2050 than in 1990. At the Paris climate conference, countries agreed to limit climate change to well below 2°C. Without considerable contributions of the shipping sector to global mitigation efforts this goal will be much harder to achieve. The main issue at stake at MEPC 71 is the development of the Comprehensive IMO Strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships. MEPC 71 ...

Despite efficiency improvements, CO2 emissions from international shipping are projected to be two to five times higher in 2050 than in 1990. At the Paris climate conference, countries agreed to limit climate change to well below 2°C. Without considerable contributions of the shipping sector to global mitigation efforts this goal will be much harder to achieve. The main issue at stake at MEPC 71 is the development of the Comprehensive IMO Strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships. MEPC 71 will be preceded by a weeklong meeting of the GHG Working Group that will discuss issues relating to the Initial Strategy that should be adopted next year.

Externe auteur

Jakob Graichen, Martin Cames, Vanessa Cook

IMO: Reducing global emissions from shipping

16-11-2016

Although emissions from international aviation and shipping were not included in the Paris Agreement on climate change, separate emission negotiations have been under way in these sectors. When the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) – a body of the International Maritime Organization – met in London in October 2016 for its 70th session, its agenda featured two items concerning air pollution from ships. While the MEPC took a clear step towards cutting sulphur emissions, progress on curbing ...

Although emissions from international aviation and shipping were not included in the Paris Agreement on climate change, separate emission negotiations have been under way in these sectors. When the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) – a body of the International Maritime Organization – met in London in October 2016 for its 70th session, its agenda featured two items concerning air pollution from ships. While the MEPC took a clear step towards cutting sulphur emissions, progress on curbing global greenhouse gas emissions has been slower.

Decision-Making Processes of ICAO and IMO in Respect of Environmental Regulations

15-09-2016

This study provides an overview of the decision-making processes of the International Civil Aviation Organisation and International Maritime Organisations in respect of environmental regulations.

This study provides an overview of the decision-making processes of the International Civil Aviation Organisation and International Maritime Organisations in respect of environmental regulations.

Key Issues at Stake at the 69th Session of the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 69)

15-04-2016

Despite efficiency improvements, CO2 emissions from international shipping are projected to be six times higher in 2050 than in 1990. At the Paris climate conference, countries agreed to limit climate change to well below 2°C. Without considerable contributions of the shipping sector to global mitigation efforts this goal will be much harder to achieve. In 2011, the IMO adopted two efficiency measures to address greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions: the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) sets compulsory ...

Despite efficiency improvements, CO2 emissions from international shipping are projected to be six times higher in 2050 than in 1990. At the Paris climate conference, countries agreed to limit climate change to well below 2°C. Without considerable contributions of the shipping sector to global mitigation efforts this goal will be much harder to achieve. In 2011, the IMO adopted two efficiency measures to address greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions: the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) sets compulsory energy efficiency standards for new ships built after 2013, and the Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) requires ships to develop a plan to monitor and possibly improve their energy efficiency; shipping was the first sector to set global efficiency standards; earlier efforts to establish a Market-based Mechanism (MBM) have not been successful to date and are still in limbo. The main issues at stake at MEPC 69 are the review of the EEDI target values, the potential adoption of a GHG data collection system and proposals for a work programme geared to determining a fair share for international shipping in global GHG mitigation efforts. Particularly the outcome of the latter will reveal the extent to which IMO Member States consider the Paris Agreement as a mandate to enhance GHG mitigation efforts under the IMO. It is recommended that the ENVI delegation use opportunities such as bilateral meetings with delegations from other countries, informal conversations or the side events to promote the adoption of an ambitious data collection system and to highlight the importance of a work programme geared to determining international shipping’s fair share in global GHG mitigation efforts.

The IMO – for 'safe, secure and efficient shipping on clean oceans'

15-02-2016

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is a United Nations specialised agency responsible for regulating international shipping. Since 1959, when it met for the first time, the IMO's overarching objectives have been the improvement of maritime safety and the prevention of marine pollution, to which maritime security was added later. The organisation's functioning reflects the diverging interests of its 171 member states acting in diverse capacities as port, coastal and flag states on the ...

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is a United Nations specialised agency responsible for regulating international shipping. Since 1959, when it met for the first time, the IMO's overarching objectives have been the improvement of maritime safety and the prevention of marine pollution, to which maritime security was added later. The organisation's functioning reflects the diverging interests of its 171 member states acting in diverse capacities as port, coastal and flag states on the one hand, and as developed, developing or least developed states, on the other. The main legal instruments used by the IMO are conventions. Generally regarded as being of a high standard, the body of technical rules adopted through these conventions is widely accepted. In contrast, the IMO received criticism in 2015 for its approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping, perceived as insufficient. While all EU Member States and the European Commission take part in IMO meetings, the EU has over the years developed and applied its own maritime legislation, which has on occasion stirred debate within the international shipping community. In 2015, the European Parliament sent its first-ever delegation to an IMO meeting. Furthermore, the Parliament added its voice to the international community calling on the IMO to step up action on reducing shipping emissions.

Implementation and effects of the Third Maritime Safety Package: Ex-Post Impact Assessment

28-10-2015

Maritime safety remains high on the political agenda for the European Union, being the driving force behind the adoption of the three Maritime Safety Packages and including it as one of the main themes of the Parliament's recommendations for the EU’s maritime transport policy until 2018.This study provides an analysis of the effectiveness of the measures included in the Third Maritime Safety Package. It illustrates (through simplified intervention logic tables), the extent to which the anticipated ...

Maritime safety remains high on the political agenda for the European Union, being the driving force behind the adoption of the three Maritime Safety Packages and including it as one of the main themes of the Parliament's recommendations for the EU’s maritime transport policy until 2018.This study provides an analysis of the effectiveness of the measures included in the Third Maritime Safety Package. It illustrates (through simplified intervention logic tables), the extent to which the anticipated effects have materialised and the challenges encountered during the first years of implementation.The report concludes that the majority of the anticipated short- and mid-term effects have materialised, while the assessment of the longer term effects led to a more cautious conclusion. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Externe auteur

Annex I of this Report has been prepared by Milieu Ltd., by Gijs Nolet, Lise Oulès, Valentina Mabilia and Nienke van der Burgt from Milieu Ltd at the request of the Ex-post Impact Assessment Unit of the Directorate for Impact Assessment and European Added Value, within the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) of the European Parliament. Feedback to the research paper has been provided by Prof. Henrik Ringbom, Prof. Eduard Somers, Jasmine Coppens and Sarah Fiona Gahlen.

Cutting sulphur emissions from ships

04-02-2015

To improve human health and protect the environment, the EU focuses on different aspects of air pollution from maritime transport. Tighter rules on sulphur emissions from ships came into effect on 1 January 2015. Under these rules, all ships operating in northern EU waters must comply with strict new sulphur emissions limits. Estimates of the impact vary, while different issues are at stake.

To improve human health and protect the environment, the EU focuses on different aspects of air pollution from maritime transport. Tighter rules on sulphur emissions from ships came into effect on 1 January 2015. Under these rules, all ships operating in northern EU waters must comply with strict new sulphur emissions limits. Estimates of the impact vary, while different issues are at stake.

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